Friday, July 22, 2005

READERS' FEEDBACK: Decorative pins for Antimacassars & Chesterfields

Re: Decorative pins for Antimacassars & Chesterfields
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/0728.htm

DearREADERS,
Susan's request to find the name of a certain type of pin used to hold antimacassars to the furniture they protected explained that most had a decorative head and a cork screw pin.

--------------------------------------------------------
From: Al Jensen
DearMYRTLE,
-- We used to call the pins upholstery pins.
-- The term 'Chesterfield' is a Canadian name for a sofa.

--------------------------------------------------------
From: Jan Turner
DearMYRTLE,
I don't know what these are called, but I have used them as recently as the 1990s to hold chair arm covers on a recliner.

-------------------------------------------------------
From: Warren Artley
DearMYRTLE,

My mother used these in central Pennsylvania over 60 years ago, and I know we have used them here in Bradenton in the past 14 years.
--------------------------------------------------------
From: CEBeal@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
I am emailing the result of my search to find the screw-in pins for sofas because prices and firms are not usually allowed on genealogy websites.
I found on page 68, home furnishing in Home Trends catalog the requested items. They call them upholstry locks, item # 030044, a 24 pack for $8,95, 2 packs for $14.00. See:
www.ShopHomeTrends.com Hope this satisfies your individual with the requirement to screw the arm & head covers to sofas & overstuffed chairs. Always enjoy your news letter!
Chuck Beal,
Project Coordinator/Manager: Beal Surname Dna Project
Member Of National Genealogical Society, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Old York Historical Society, Mayflower Society, Beals Historic Society, Clan Bell International and the Beall Family Association

--------------------------------------------------------
DearREADERS,
So we can tell Susan, that from our collective recollections, the decorative pins with the cork-screw type shafts were merely called upholstery pins or upholstery locks. These are not to be confused with upholstery tacks, which are those decorative nail heads used in long rows around the edges of a chair, ottoman, sofa or headboard to hold the fabric in place and to add a distinctive detail. I initially saw them on a dark green leather chair in the den of our home as a child.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

No comments:

Post a Comment