Saturday, April 30, 2005

Immigrant Children's Clothing

From: Bking2824@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,First let me tell you I love your column. I have started my family history a few years ago but haven't had much time to work on it a lot. My question today isn't really about family history - but it is history. My 2 grandsons ages 11 and 13 are in their spring concert at there school May 26. They go to a private Christian school. The theme is "Coming to America."


I have just found out that my grandchildren will have a singing part and they will be playing 2 brothers coming into Ellis Island. I have to make their costumes. I tried going on line and searching for clothing for children coming into Ellis Island but I guess I'm not very good at this search thing yet.

Can you please give me some ideas of how to research this project? I would like for them to look as authentic as possible but I am not sure what clothing to look for. I would also like to make or redo old clothes without too much expense although the school will be able to pass these costumes down for other events.

DearBRENDA,
Without studying history, climbing family trees would mean nothing more than names and dates. This sort of research is just what we should be doing, to better understand our ancestors.

I think you are looking for dark brown or black knickers or pants with suspenders, and loose-fitting white shirts rolled-up sleeves (with or without collars.) Include some sort of a cap, not unlike an old-fashioned golf cap. How about thinking along the lines of TITANIC and Leonardo DeCaprio? How about a slightly later time period with the casual style "Spanky & our Gang?" I believe the folks wore what they did based on their country of origin.

There are few pictures in the ELLIS ISLAND website's "Immigrant Experience" (mostly buildings)
http://www.ellisislandrecords.org/Immexp/index.asp

Ellis Island Immigration Museum (mostly buildings)
http://www.ellisisland.com

Historical Boy's Clothing
http://histclo.hispeed.com/style/style.html

"Russian Blouse" suit looks mighty convincing, and less like American boys to me. What do you think? http://histclo.com/style/suit/russian/russianbs.html

"Casual Knickers" (with suspenders and dark shirt, though I think light shirt would be more appropriate.) http://histclo.com/style/pants/knick/knickc.html

This smock-top shirt and beret looks like a good possibility:
http://histclo.com/style/head/beret/beret.html

I think one of the distinguishing items would be long woolen stockings, smooth in texture and solid in color. These seem typically to have been worn with laced up high top leather shoes. (Good luck on finding a cost effective substitute for those shoes. Any leather shoe would be more "old fashioned" than $150 Nike shoes of the 21st century.

--------------------------------------------------------
FOR FURTHER READING:
--------------------------------------------------------
-- CLOTHING STYLES
http://www.ajmorris.com/roots/photo/datep18.htm

-- DRESSED FOR THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Ordinary Americans and Fashion, 1840-1900 by Joan Severa. Kent State University Press (March 1, 1997) ISBN: 0873385128.

-- AMERICAN VICTORIAN COSTUME IN EARLY PHOTOGRAPHS by Priscilla Harris Dalrymple. Publisher: Dover Publications (May 1, 1991) ISBN: 0486265331.

--------------------------------------------------------
The following items I discovered while perusing the topic of "children's clothing styles" at
www.amazon.com. I don't own the books, and therefore haven't viewed them, but they look useful. You might try to locate them through inter-library loan.

-- Clothing, Costumes, and Uniforms Throughout American History, by Allison Stark Draper. PowerKids Press (July 1, 2001) ISBN: 0823956679.

-- Children's Fashions 1900-1950 As Pictured in Sears Catalogs by JoAnne Olian (Editor). Dover Publications (April 8, 2003) ISBN: 0486423255.

-- Children's Fashions, 1860-1912 : 1,065 Costume Designs from "La Mode Illustree" by JoAnne Olian. Dover Publications (July 5, 1994)ISBN: 0486276155.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Friday, April 29, 2005

FHL Research Outlines

DearREADERS,
Did you know that:

-- "Most Latin American governments began civil registration after 1870, although some began much earlier. After this date, almost all individuals, Catholic or non-Catholic, were recorded. This is particularly helpful because non-Catholic religions began to flourish in many areas of Latin America at about this time." (1)

-- Netherlands Christening records "may go back to the 1500s, when they began during the Reformation. Because of wars, natural disasters, and accidents, many churches were destroyed, along with all or part of their records." (2)

-- Eric J. Holmgren's "Over 2000 Place Names of Alberta" [Saskatoon, Saskatchewan: Western Producer Prairie Books, 1976] is "...an alphabetical list of places in Alberta with a description and history of the location, municipality, town, or village. It also contains a map showing the districts and towns." (3)

-- "The first land grants to English settlers, in what is now the District of Columbia (then Charles County, Maryland), were made in 1663. Scottish immigrants founded Georgetown in 1751. Only a few people lived in the area when the federal government offices were moved there from Philadelphia in 1800. The city grew slowly until the 1860s, when the population more than doubled during and after the Civil War." (4)

-- "The Church in Wales (Church of England) Records - The parish is the most basic unit of church administration, although the parish was often divided into townships or tithings. Large parishes had small chapels of ease, or chapelries, for those who lived too far away to attend the parish church. Gazetteers can help you locate parishes and townships." (5)

-- "Daughters of the Black Eagle Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution (Great Falls, Montana) compiled and typed the 'Abstracts of wills, Cascade County, Montana, 1884-1927.' [The book is found at the FHL (Family History Library) by call number: 978.661 S28a, 3 vols.. It is also available on microfilm #870042 items 2–3.] (6)

WHERE did ol' Myrt discover these interesting tidbits of genealogical research minutae? Online at
<
http://www.familysearch.org>
In my opinion these RESEARCH OUTLINES are the most underutilized yet most valuable source of "how to" research help on the web. Access them by:
1. Point your web browser to: <
http://www.familysearch.org>
2. Click the "Search" tab
3. Click "Research Helps" on the blue navigation bar.
4. Click the letter of the alphabet for your ancestor's locality:
FOR EXAMPLE: clicking "S" yields a 3-page print out including a variety of links for assistance in doing genealogy in:
-- Sachsen, Germany
-- Sachsen, Preußen, Germany
-- Saskatchewan, Canada
-- Schleswig-Holstein, Preußen, Germany
-- Scotland
-- Slovakia
-- South Carolina
-- South Dakota
-- Spain
-- Suriname
-- Sweden
-- Switzerland
If you view these online, and a particular microfilm or book is mentioned, it is clickable to the FHLC (Family History Library Catalog) so you can print out the page and take it to your local FHC to "order in" the item.

FOR FURTHER READING:
(1) Latin American Research Outline, Family History Library
<http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rhelps.asp>

(2) Netherlands Church Record Christenings, Family History Library
<
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rhelps.asp>

(3) Alberta, Canada, Boundary Changes and Maps, Family History Library
<
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rhelps.asp>

(4) District of Columbia Research Outline, Family History Library
<
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rhelps.asp>

(5) Wales Research Outline, Family History Library
<
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rhelps.asp>

(6) Montana Statewide Indexes and Collections, Family History Library
<
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rhelps.asp>

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Sunday, April 24, 2005

ACROSS MY DESK: Toronto Emigrant Office Records
DearREADERS,
In an announcement from inGeneas inc. we learn about Toronto Emigrant Office Records <http://www.ingeneas.com> "Most of these new records are from the registers of the Toronto Emigrant Office, volumes 1 and 2, from 3 January 1865 to 29 December 1876. These almost 18,500 records list those who came to the office looking for assistance from the government to travel to many destinations across south-central Ontario. The records typically provide the following information: date of application [at office]; name of the head of the party; nationality; breakdown of the party by age groupings; name of the ship on which the party traveled to Canada; name of the Canadian port at which the ship landed; and, the destination of party (within Ontario)."

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Polish Roots - First hand research

DearREADERS,
You might want to pick up on a first-hand report of one researcher's suggestions for Polish family tree climbing. Nancy <NJMaciolek@aol.com> wrote THE GIFT OF FAMILY:

Part 1. Where Did I Come From?
<
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art25546.asp>

Part 2. Research in the USA
<
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art25569.asp>

Part 3. Research in Polish, Research in Poland
<
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art25570.asp>

Part 4. A Passion for Poland, Polish Tradition and Culture (IV)
<
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art25572.asp>

Part 5. Searching through Towns & Villages where my Ancestors lived
<
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art25591.asp>

Part 6. Genealogy Search – Afterward
<
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art25592.asp>

If you have ancestors from Poland, you'll also be interested in reading:
How to find the Family Nest - Town or Village where your Family comes from
<
http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art714.asp>

Now ol' Myrt here will be away until Saturday. This time, its NOT research NOR is it a seminar. Its FISHING in Lake Okeechobee. Wish me luck. There is a full moon tomorrow night!

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Re: Family Tree's Bad Apples Can Be a Shock

From: Jan Turner jaturner@harborside.com
DearMYRTLE,
After reading your message, "Family Tree's Bad Apples Can Be a Shock," <
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/04301.htm> I was reminded of a question that has been
"bothering" me ever since I began genealogy 8 years ago. My grandfather is believed, by his children and grandchildren, to have been a pedophile. We all knew, as he made no secret of the fact, that he "liked" boys - and went to great lengths to always have a boy whom he was "sponsoring" for as long as I can remember him. He died about 35 years ago, so he is not likely to be confronted by this info, and he has only one living child remaining - a woman who is 89 years old and in an Alzheimer's home at the present.


My question is this: Should these suspicions/speculations be included in my genealogy notes about the man? For me, it makes no difference at this point in time - I suppose that in reality it never did, however, I am trying to make all my notes in such a way that whatever is left 100 years from now, my/my relatives descendants will have some idea of the person behind the name/date/place that is the basic info in the genealogy programs. I have a sub-group in my notes titled Myths/Legends where I put all of the miscellaneous "whisperings", rumor, etc that may or may not have some usefullness and/or meaning in the future.

DearJAN,
"Myths/Legends" is a noble-sounding category. While I believe that working through "suspicions" and "drawing conclusions" are part of genealogy research, but I am not sure these should extend to labeling people. We're compiling our family histories, not writing for a tabloid magazine. Having said that, just yesterday I labeled the photocopy of an handwritten letter with overly-glowing ancestor notations as follows:

"INFAMOUS LETTER by Uncle Eugene, who was ever the family comic, and quite the prankster. His niece Mary (Stover) Dayton states she does not take much stock in the truthfulness of anything Eugene wrote in this letter."

How about just the facts, without drawing the conclusion, in your grandfather's case? To use your words, I would write it up like this:

Jan Turner's personal recollections of her [maternal/paternal] grandfather [insert his name here]: "He made no secret of the fact, that he "liked" boys - and went to great lengths to always have a boy whom he was "sponsoring" for as long as I can remember him." That way you are not making sweeping statements, which tend to deter people from believing your work.

Let's leave the final judgments to the courts and God.
Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com


Saturday, April 23, 2005

ACROSS MY DESK: Family Tree's Bad Apples Can Be a Shock

From: Carol Bentley clsb64@swbell.net
DearMYRTLE,
My husband found this article in the Washington Times. I thought it interesting:

-----------------------------------------------------------
FAMILY TREE'S BAD APPLES CAN BE A SHOCK
By Elizabeth Day
LONDON SUNDAY TELEGRAPH
Copyright (c) 2005 News World Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.
-----------------------------------------------------------
LONDON -- Genealogists want psychotherapy to be made available for people who stumble across unpleasant discoveries while researching their family history.


Britain's Society of Genealogists is one of several organizations concerned that amateur historians are not sufficiently prepared for the secrets they might uncover in their family records and could need counseling to help them through the emotional process.


"People can be dealing with many serious things -- from discovering your ancestor was a rapist who was deported to Australia to finding out you are adopted," said Else Churchill, a genealogy officer at the society. [...]

Last year, a survey conducted by <http://www.1837online.com>, a genealogical Web site, found that 10 percent of amateur historians hope to unearth a family skeleton.

NOTE: For the full article see: The Washington Times
<
http://www.washingtontimes.com/world/20050422-111145-4575r.htm>

Friday, April 22, 2005

READERS' FEEDBACK: Cost Effective Solution for Distributing Society Newsletters
RE: <http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/0425.htm>

From: Kathy kathywilson345@myway.com
DearMYRTLE,
In response to converting Word documents to "PDF" files. Check out <
http://www.pdf995.com>. I have been using the free version and am very pleased with it. I put together a CD consisting of pictures and word documents for our 40th class reunion in 2003. I used the pdf995 to convert all the Word documents to PDF so everyone could read them.

DearKATHY,
It took me a minute to locate the FREE pdf995 download at: where it states "The free versions of pdf995 products will display a sponsor page in your web browser each time you run the software. If you would prefer not to see sponsor pages, you may upgrade by obtaining a key at any time for $9.95." Sounds interesting. I assume that if you could place the .pdf files on a CD, that they could also be placed on a website, as I am planning to do with our society's newsletter. -- Myrt :)

--------------------------------------------------------
From: Lee Anders leeanders@gmail.com
DearMYRTLE,I've been using CutePDF for several months now and love it. The best part is it's free! <
http://www.cutepdf.com/Products/CutePDF/writer.asp>
DearLEE,
It would appear that the program does indeed "Create PDF documents on the fly — for free. Portable Document Format (PDF) is the de facto standard for the secure and reliable distribution and exchange of electronic documents and forms around the world. CutePDF Writer (formerly CutePDF Printer) is the free version of commercial PDF creation software. CutePDF Writer installs itself as a "printer subsystem". This enables virtually any Windows applications (must be able to print) to create professional quality PDF documents - with just a push of a button! Free for personal and commercial use! No watermarks! No Popup Web Ads!"

This is also an interesting alternative. I shall look into this one as well. By next fall, I should have enough experience with these two to compare it with my old standby - Neevia's docuPrinter LT ($19) <http://neevia.com/pricing/?prodid=DP50LT>

--------------------------------------------------------
From: Dittmar, Frederick M. dittmar_ksa@ou.edu
DearMYRTLE,Greetings again from Oklahoma. [...] To play the Devil's Advocate on the Blog and Society Newsletters. What about the 20% of the members that don't have a computer? How do you get the messages out to them? Some people are plugged in yet some are still kicking and screaming.

DearFRED,
Back in 1989 when I moved to Bradenton, Florida the Manasota Genealogical Society had only three members with computers. We were really considered out in left field back then. There is now only one member who does not have an internet connection at home. That person volunteers at the library, and has a friend who prints out genealogy mailing list messages of interest to her. The library will print out one copy of our newsletter for their shelves, so I am certain that indivdual can read the newsletter during her volunteer "genie" shift each week.

I rather favor the thought expressed by Family Chronicle Magazine publisher Halvor Mooreshead who said we all must start doing genealogy on the internet. See "THE INTERNET IS THE WAY TO START" <http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/0114.htm>
Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

READER'S RESPONSE: Picking Green Beans

DearREADERS,
This is just in from a contemporary of my father who also recalls volunteering at the church welfare bean farm. I remember as a 2nd-grader playing with his children, since their home was two doors down from us on 55th NE in Laurelhurst, on Lake Washington in Seattle. Don has some interesting recollections about the cannery, where children aren't part of the volunteer work force.

This is an prime example of how 2 eye-witnesses can provide different perspectives on the same topic. I'll bet if you and your siblings discussed growing up in the "XYZ household" your views would have much in common, but there would be some interesting additional highlights brought forth by listening to the stories of others. This is why we must look for all available evidence on each ancestor, in order to gain a greater understanding of his life and times.

Myrt :)

--------------------------------------------------------
From: Don C. Wood, Jr. donwoodjr@san.rr.com
DearMYRTLE, Thank you for the copy of your column titled "Picking green beans yesterday" See: <http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/0429.htm>. It really did bring back memories of the bean farm, and also the church welfare cannery. Did you ever get to go over there? I think it was in Bellevue [WA] but my memory often has ragged spots or holes so that might be erroneous.

I distinctly remember one night when we were processing and canning strawberry jam We did not raise the berries but purchased them. My assignment was to stir the huge half-hemisphere shaped copper bottomed kettle where the berries, sugar and pectin were boiled up prior to being canned. I had a large wooden paddle to stir with.

They put in about 100 Pounds of berries, a 100 pound sack of sugar and a couple of cups of pectin, and I stirred until it was boiling hard. It was heavy, hot work but we all enjoyed our jobs and we all enjoyed the thought that someone would benefit from the fruits of our labors. On this one batch someone put the pectin in at least twice and it got gelled so rapidly that we had a hard time getting it into the cans before it set up. One of the other fellows opened a can of it a couple of days later at his home and said that he had to get the jam out with an axe.

That sounds a bit far fetched but I also got a can of it and he was not far off the truth. It was very hard to get out of the can. Ahhh – memories of old times. They are good to muse over now and then to make us appreciate the times and places we have come from as well as where we are now and the great technological advancements we have to make our lives easier.


Thursday, April 21, 2005

Picking green beans yesterday
DearREADERS,


We went out to the fields at Hunsader's yesterday to gather a bushel of green beans. As I bent over to pick from the last half of the row, I wondered if the bean stalks were getting shorter or was I just getting taller.

THE ANSWER TO THE QUESTION speaks to the subject of possible bias in eye-witness reports. Diligent genealogists must weigh the reliability of evidence presented from a variety of sources, before adding or subtracting someone from the family pedigree. To rely solely on the recollections of one individual or info from one contemporary source document, might have us barking up the wrong family tree.

--------------------------------------------------------
HERE'S THE STORY:
--------------------------------------------------------
As a little girl, my family would go about twice a season to work at our church's bean farm in the greater Seattle area. I was too little to remember WHERE it was. I do remember that it was a "welfare" farm, meaning that the crops were sent to the church cannery to provide food for the poor in our midst.

In the "good old days" I dreaded these hot, dusty farm jaunts. I guess I wasn't very charitable. Now I love "getting back to nature" and enjoy the crisp, sweetness of the fresh-picked beans.

Our job, during our first annual visit to the welfare farm, was to weed between the plants. We would then return at the end of the season to help bring in the crop. I remember sitting at the bases of a hundred and fifty million bean plants, picking the long stringers on the shady side of the rows. The disadvantage of a rare slight breeze was that it only served to stir up the dust from the dry top layer of soil.

My job yesterday was to have fun, pick some beans, and blanche some to put away for the off-season. But picking in either a bent-over or semi-crouched position would surely become backbreaking if one kept this up for more than an hour. I felt a lot more appreciative of the
migrant workers in the adjacent field.

SO WHAT WAS SO DIFFERENT ABOUT THESE TWO PERSPECTIVES, or was it just that my memory of the size of the job was failing me?

Back in the 1950s, I am sure that the daunting task of weeding two complete rows loomed large in my mind. As I considered the question, I smiled at my childhood memories. Then I literally laughed out loud as the answer became clear.

Are the bean stalks getting shorter or am I just getting taller?

Neither! The church welfare farm of the "olden days" grew "pole" beans, and yesterday I was picking "bush" beans.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Wednesday, April 20, 2005

CORRECT URL for Lincoln Museum

From: Moore, Karl KMoore@ILSOS.NET
DearMYRTLE,

Just a note to point you to the actual new Lincoln museum in Springfield, Illinois: the website address is: http://www.alplm.org/home.html
The Lincoln Museum in Fort Wayne, Indiana opened to the public in 1931. Their website is very interesting but not to be confused with the new Lincoln museum in Springfield, Illinois.
Sincerely,
Karl Moore
Illinois State Archives


--------------------------------------------------------
From: Sally Brown muz@tampabay.rr.com
DearMYRTLE,I believe the web site listed in your recent email message about the Lincoln Library was about two different libraries. The address you listed was for the museum in Ft. Wayne, Ind. The new library and museum just dedicated in Springfield, Ill. is:
www.alplm.org
The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library & Museum

Enjoy your emails with the ideas and suggestions.
Sally Brown
Pinellas Genealogy Society

Lots of learning opportunities

From: admin@genealogicalstudies.com
DearMYRTLE,


Lots of exciting things going on at the end of May:

1. A British Day hosted by the National Institute for Genealogical Studies;
2. Graduation Ceremony hosted by the University of Toronto and the National Institute for Genealogical Studies;
3. Professional Research and Business Skills hosted by the Association of Professional Genealogists-Ontario Chapter;
4. Librarians and Genealogists - A Year Later...
5. The Ontario Genealogical Society's Seminar 2005 hosted by the Essex and Lambton branches.
These activities are starting on Thursday May 26th and will all be held in Windsor, Ontario (Across the river from Detroit Michigan).


Here's some general information.
1. A BRITISH DAY: Religion, Welfare and our English Ancestors Need more research hints and tools to find your English ancestors? Join two instructors and experienced genealogists from the National Institute, Dr. Penelope Christensen and Ryan Taylor, on Thursday, May 26th for a day of learning more about the evolution of parish registers, finding more than just BMD facts, England's poor law and the parish chest. Also included, non-conformist records, for information not found in parish records.
For more information or to register: call 1-800-580-0165 or online:
Go to
www.genealogicalstudies.com
Click on the menu item INFORMATION
Click on FIELD TRIPS
Click on Research Academy in Windsor: A British Day A description of the lectures is available. When ready, click on Register to complete the registration process. Call if you need help 1-800-580-0165.

2. Graduation Ceremony hosted by the University of Toronto and the National Institute for Genealogical Studies ----- FREE, everyone is invited...
The National Institute for Genealogical Studies and the University of Toronto FIS/PLC invite you to come celebrate with them and their students during the evening of Thursday, 26 May 2005. Activities (all held at the Cleary International Centre) will include a presentation on the importance of education and certification in the genealogical community, a few short speeches, and an introduction of our graduates. Mingle with students, instructors and leaders at a reception following the formal program.
For more information or to register for this free event: call 1-800-580-0165 or online:
Go to
www.genealogicalstudies.com
Click on the menu item INFORMATION
Click on FIELD TRIPS
Click on An Evening with the National Institute and the University of Toronto Click on REGISTER, click Add to Cart and continue the registration process. Call 1-800-580-0165 if you need help.

3. Professional Research and Business Skills hosted by the Association of Professional Genealogists-Ontario Chapter Also on Thursday May 26, Topics include Practical Information on Certification; Deadly Advantages-Information at a death of a person; Writing Family History from a Professional's Point of View; and Working with Librarians-Going for the Win-Win Options. The program is intended for:
* family historians and genealogists who want to upgrade their skills;
* actual or potential for-hire genealogists who want practical advice;
* everyone who wants to keep up with recent genealogical techniques.
For more information:
http://www.rootsweb.com/~onapg/program.pdf or call 416-861-0165.
You can include your $65 registration fee for this OC-APG event with your OGS Seminar 2005 registration or it can be mailed directly to Louise St Denis 30 Wellington Street East, Suite 2002 Toronto ON M5E 1S3 (Cheque payable to Association of Professional Genealogists-Ontario Chapter)

4. Librarians and Genealogists - A Year Later...
Also on May 26th. Topics include: One Library and 4000 Branches-How the Family History Centres Run; Patrons Looking for French-Canadian Ancestors; Romancing the Genealogist; Using Genealogical and Historical Serials to your Advantage.
For more information:
http://www.ogsseminar.org/preconference.html or ecole@oakville.ca or 905-815-2042 ext 5037

5. The Ontario Genealogical Society's Seminar 2005 hosted by the Essex and Lambton branches Three days filled with lectures - starting on May 27th to May 29th. Lectures include: Solving Complex Research Problems; Using Genealogical Proof Standard; Using the Internet; Marriage Records in 19th century Ontario; Using the English Census Online; Adoptions in Ontario; Military Records; Irish Records; Place Names; Border Entry Records; Newspapers; Genetics; Surnames; Railroads; PERSI; Crown Land Records; Family Tree Maker; French in Michigan; Scottish Research; Foremothers; Non-francophone in Quebec; Burton Library; Canadian Lumbermen; French Canadian in SW Ontario; Ontario Migration to Michigan; Lambton Room; Ontario Vital Records; Tracing UEL Ancestors; French Canadian Research; Passenger Lists; War of 1812; German Research; Black History; Catholic Records; Real Estate Agents; Research Trips.
Don't forget to visit the Exhibitors area.
For more information:
http://www.ogsseminar.org

If you have any questions about any of these activities, feel free to give us a call toll free at 1-800-580-0165
Louise St Denis
The National Institute for Genealogical Studies
www.genealogicalstudies.com admin@genealogicalstudies.com
Definition of OBSCURE

DearREADERS,
Yesterday's "word of the day" at MyYahoo.com was provided by Petersons.com:

OBSCURE
DEFINITION: (adjective) little known; hard to understand
EXAMPLE: Mendel was an obscure monk until decades after his death, when his scientific work was finally discovered. Most people find the writings of James Joyce obscure; hence the popularity of books that explain his books.
SYNONYMS: hazy, mysterious, unclear

--------------------------------------------------------
We need to let the folks at Petersons.com know about the additional definitions, which are familiar to all family historians.


OBSCURE as in "obscure ancestor"
-- little known ancestor
-- hard to find ancestor
-- one who stowed away on a trans-Atlantic ship, hence no customs passenger lists
-- one who left town, with no forwarding address
-- one who chose not to leave a will naming heirs
-- one who didn't own property to be inherited by family members
-- one who didn't serve in the military, hence no thick pension file
-- one who successfully eluded the census enumerator and the tax collector
-- one who didn't vote
-- one who didn't leave a diary
-- one who left a stack of letters with totally illegible handwriting
-- one whose only surviving photo isn't labeled
-- one whose 6th generation family bible was carried away in a flood
-- one whose living descendants aren't using RootsWeb message boards and mailing lists to share info

MOST COMMON DEFINITIONS include:
-- one darned frustrating ancestor that we've each got at least one of on the family tree.

Got any more definitions to add to the list?

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Tuesday, April 19, 2005

Check out the Lincoln Museum dedicated today

DearREADERS,
You'll want to check out the Lincoln Museum dedicated today in Springfield, Illinois. The website is http://www.thelincolnmuseum.org/

From the Lincoln family album we read "Mary Todd was ambitious, politically sophisticated, and well educated. After she married Abraham Lincoln in 1842, the couple had four boys (one of whom died in 1850 at the age of three). Their marriage was tempestuous, due to her temper and his carelessness in domestic matters, but generally successful.

For the first year after the Lincoln family moved to Washington in 1861, Mary reveled in her role as First Lady, although she outran her financial resources managing the White House. Tragedy struck in February 1862, when her favorite son Willie died at the age of eleven."

There is much to be experienced by visiting the website. I believe the museum folks did an excellent job of attempting to translate the museum experience into an informational website.

Happy family tree climbing!

Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Cost Effective Solution for Distributing Society Newsletters

DearREADERS,
Our genealogical society of 125 members determined it simply could NOT afford to continue printing a paper copy of our newsletters and distributing via snail mail. Rising costs of paper, printing & even bulk-mail postage was killing our budget, effectively cutting down on the amount of money we could dontate to the local library for new genealogy books.

--------------------------------------------------------
PREVIOUS SOLUTIONS THAT JUST DIDN'T CUT THE MUSTARD
--------------------------------------------------------

OLD IDEA #1: Send out a generic (no photos, no bold/italics/underline) version of the newsletter on the society's mailing list. These lists are provided freely by RootsWeb.com, and are a good idea to improve communications, but the generic nature of the email distribution made the newsletters less interesting.

OLD IDEA #2: Put a copy of the newsletter up on the society's website to view/print. The problem is that printing pages 1-20 for one person becomes pages 1-27 for the next person. WHY? Because each person's PC settings for viewing the web are different. Also, various web browsers (AOL, Mozilla, Internet Explorer, CompuServe, Netscape, NetZero, etc.) look at web pages differently. Believe me this last point is a universal problem observed by webmasters and internet gurus since the beginning of time. (Internet time that is!)

--------------------------------------------------------
COST EFFECTIVE SOLUTION FOR
DISTRIBUTING NEWSLETTERS
--------------------------------------------------------
STEP #1: Newsletter editors may convert the files to .pdf files, which are Adobe Acrobat Reader compatible files. Its important to note that the resulting pages cannot be altered by the "reader."

STEP #2: The society's webmaster uploads the .pdf file for that issue of the newsletter to the society's website, providing a link on a "Newsletter" page so members can click to view/print.

STEP #3: The newsletter editor makes the announcement about the new issue on the society's genealogy mailing list or blog.

STEP #4: Members of the mailing list, connect to the web, click on the link in the mailing list or blog in order to view/print the newest issue of the newsletter.~ or ~Anyone visiting the society's website can click the link provided on the site to view/print the newsletter.

--------------------------------------------------------
CONVERTING NEWSLETTERS TO .pdf FORMAT
--------------------------------------------------------

There are a variety of solutions available to newsletter editors for converting the MS Word, MS Publisher or whatever program's file to a .pdf file.

-- Some programs like PageMaker allow you to "export as .pdf" file.
-- Adobe's Online Conversion $99.99 annually
http://createpdf.adobe.com/?v=AHP
-- Adobe Acrobat Standard Edition $299.99 http://store.adobe.com/store/products/master.jhtml?id=catAcrobatStnd&id=catAcrobatStnd
-- Neevia's free conversion (1mb file size limit) http://convert.neevia.com/
-- Neevia's docuPrinter LT ($19) http://neevia.com/pricing/?prodid=DP50LT

I recommend the last option. According to non-Neevia message board postings, it works well. The product is described by the publisher as follows:"Neevia docuPrinter LT is a PDF printer driver, that can instantly convert any windows document into PDF. Simply select docuPrinter as your printer driver, print to it and your PDF file will be created and ready to view. PDF files created by docuPrinter LT are fully compatible with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Neevia docuPrinter LT can enable even the novice computer operator to generate high-quality, searchable PDF without high costs. If you need to create PDF files but do not need the numerous features of the Neevia docuPrinter Pro, then this is the right product for you."

--------------------------------------------------------
FOR FURTHER READING
--------------------------------------------------------
-- Neevia docuPrinter LT (features, specifications, product comparison & FAQs)
http://neevia.com/products/dplt/

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Monday, April 18, 2005

How to Subscribe to Blogs - Using SharpReader


See
also:





DearREADERS,

Blogs are perhaps the best new way to read the genealogy columns you love. NO
MORE bounced emails automatically unsubscribing you from the list. CUT DOWN no
the pile of email in your inbox. Don't worry, it's easy if you follow my simple
1-2-3 directions:


1.
Download SharpReader
& Install SharpReader



  • Go to www.sharpreader.com
    and click "installer" to download the free program.

  • Close the SharpReader program (we will get back
    to it later!)


2.
Add DearMYRTLE's Feed



  • Use your regular web-browser to go to www.DearMYRTLE.com

  • Right-click on the XML logo on the bottom of any
    page, as shown below:








  • On the pop-up menu, select "Copy Link
    Location" as shown below:










  • Close your web browser.

  • Open the SharpReader program.

  • Click "File" on the SharpReader menu
    bar and select "Open RSS Feed." You will get a pop-up window.

  • Right-click in the text box and select
    "Paste" to insert the text as show in red below.










  • NOTE: Your text won't be red. I only used red to
    bring it to your attention in this picture. The XML feed for my columns is:

    http://dearmyrtle.blogspot.com/atom.xml

  • Click to insert a check mark in the
    "Subscribe to feed" box.

  • Click the OK button.

  • If you are online, after clicking OK, it will be
    a few moments before the list of columns starts to show up in SpeedReader.


3.
View the feeds in SharpReader



  • NOTE: From the screen shot below, you can see
    that I subscribe to 4 genealogy feeds (or blogs.)

  • There are three parts to the SharpReader screen:




  1. Feeds

  2. Listings (of individual columns by title, date
    & author.

  3. Actual column


Because I double-clicked on the listing READERS'
FEEDBACK 12 April 2005, I can see the entire column in the actual column area
of SharpReader. Before this, in the place of my gorgeous picture, you'd find
only the first 3-4 lines of text from the column, which (hopefully) will spark
you interest.




You may
use this same method to subscribe to other feeds.
How do you know there is a feed that can be picked up by your
SharpReader. Whenever you are visiting a website, and you see the
"XML" logo, just right click, as described in step 2 above to
"copy the link location" then paste that link in SharpReader as
described above.


One more thing.
If you turn SharpReader on (and you are on the internet) within
minutes of my posting a new column SharpReader will pick up the feed, and give
you a short 3-4 second popup notice in the lower right hand portion of your
screen, as illustrated below:









You may elect to read the feed by clicking on the
link in the notification box, or wait until you want to review the entire
listing of columns as described earlier in this column.


NOTE: There are other "feed readers"
for different operating systems. See:


Windows
Compatibale "FeedReaders"


Macintosh Compatible "Feed
Readers"



Linux Compatible "Feed
Readers"



Other unusual computer operating system
"Feed Readers"




Happy family tree climbing!

Myrt :)

DearMYRTLE,

6023 26th Street West PMB 352

Bradenton, FL 34207

http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

How to subscribe to blogs - Using MyYahoo





See also:


DearREADERS,

Blogs are perhaps the best new way to read the genealogy columns you love. NO
MORE bounced emails automatically unsubscribing you from the list. CUT DOWN no
the pile of email in your inbox. Don't worry, it's easy if you follow my simple
1-2-3 directions:

1. Set up your "MyYahoo" account for free.

  • Go to www.Yahoo.com and click on the "MyYahoo" icon as shown below:




  • Follow the screen prompts to set up your account.
  • From now on, go to http://my.yahoo.com to narrow it down to one step.

  • Your "MyYahoo" page will have a generic layout which can be modified for color, layout and content.


2. Add DearMYRTLE's Feed

  • Add content as desired, including stocks, calendars, top news items, weather and of course, DearMYRTLE's column. To do this click the "Add Content" button as shown below:






Click the "Add RSS Feed by URL" link shown below, circled in red:












  • Click the "Finished" button to invoke
    the changes, and view your "MyYahoo" page.


3. View
the feeds in MyYahoo



  • Whether
    viewing the web from your home computer at the public library, simply go
    to
    http://my.yahoo.com and log in if
    necessary.

  • Other
    genealogy columnists are sending out blogs (RSS feeds) you can add these to
    your MyYahoo page as well. Here are the RSS Feed URLS to paste into the
    "MyYahoo" page described above:












Happy family tree climbing!

Myrt :)

DearMYRTLE,

6023 26th Street West PMB 352

Bradenton, FL 34207

http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Receive notice of DM columns 2 different ways

DearREADERS,
You've heard about "BLOGS" the online "web logs." Now you can receive DearMYRTLE's columns in a different way WITHOUT filling up your email box. That's right NO EMAIL is involved. Using either Method #1 or Method #2, you will receive:


-- automatic notice of publication
-- headline of the column
-- 3-4 lines of the opening sentences

--------------------------------------------------------
WHAT DO YOU DO WITH DearMYRTLE'S BLOG NOTICE?
--------------------------------------------------------
-- glance at the list of titles & opening sentences
-- double-click to view only those columns that interest you
-- print the blog version of the column
-- forward the column to someone's email box

--------------------------------------------------------
IS THIS SOME GRAND INTERNET
EXPERIMENT?
--------------------------------------------------------
Actually blogs have been around for years, but only the computer geeks used them in the past. But now, well-known genealogy writers use blogs including Dick Eastman, who is always ahead of ol' Myrt here when it comes to things technological. You'll also note that there are genealogy blogs by About.com's genealogy expert Kimberly Powell, Pajama Genealogy's Robert Ragan, and Heritage Quest Magazine's Leland Meitzler.

--------------------------------------------------------
SO IF BLOGS ARE HERE TO SAY, I GUESS
I'll HAVE TO LEARN SOMETHING NEW
--------------------------------------------------------
Blogs are perhaps the best way to read the genealogy columns you love. NO MORE bounced emails automatically unsubscribing you from the list. CUT DOWN no the pile of email in your inbox. Don't worry, it's easy if you follow my simple suggestions.

--------------------------------------------------------
WHAT IS METHOD #1?
--------------------------------------------------------
Internet-based MyYahoo account

For easy, step-by-step directions with screen shots on setting this up see:
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com/05/myyahoo.htm

--------------------------------------------------------
WHAT IS METHOD #2?
--------------------------------------------------------
Your PC-based (free) SharpReader software.

For easy, step-by-step directions with screen shots on setting this up see:
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com/05/sharpreader.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

ACROSS MY DESK: Noble & Pious Thing

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

From the most recent issue of "The Weekly Fireside" of the American Civil War History Special Interest Group (on AOL) for the week ending 10 April 2005. To subscribe, send an email to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com with subscribe in the subject line.

ACROSS MY DESK: Free 72-hour Access to a Premium Database at NewEnglandAncestors.Org

This just in from Dick Eastman who works at HisGen, see:
http://eogn.typepad.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2005/04/free_access_to_.html

--------------------------------------------------------
Free Access to a Premium Database
at NewEnglandAncestors.Org
--------------------------------------------------------

The following is an announcement from the New England Historic Genealogical Society:

Celebrate Patriots' Day with Free Access to a Premium DB at NewEnglandAncestors.Org

In recognition of Patriot's Day on April 18, the New England Historic Genealogical Society will offer three days of free access to one of our major databases at NewEnglandAncestors.Org. The name of the database and access details will appear in the April 20, 2005, issue of the NEHGS eNews.

The complimentary open access period begins Wednesday afternoon, April 20, and ends seventy-two hours later on Saturday afternoon, April 23. If you are not yet a member of NEHGS, but want to spend some time researching in one of our premium databases, this is your chance. Now that tax
season is behind us, we invite you to spend some of your free time researching your early New England ancestors.

Patriots' Day is a unique holiday in Massachusetts, home of NEHGS. It commemorates the battles of Lexington and Concord which took place on April 19, 1775. It is a state holiday in Massachusetts, Maine, and Wisconsin. In addition to its great historical significance, it is now known to many as the day of the running of the Boston Marathon. NEHGS will tie the holiday to this
special database promotion and link genealogists everywhere to a piece of their New England heritage.

The easiest way to learn which database will be offered, and how to link to it, is to subscribe to the NEHGS eNews at: http://www.newenglandancestors.org/education/articles/NEXUS_eNews/enews_main.asp.

As soon as the eNews is sent next Wednesday afternoon, we will also place a link
on our homepage at www.NewEnglandAncestors.org

Thursday, April 14, 2005

ACROSS MY DESK: 5 Way to Encourage People to Share
DearREADERS,
On my way out the door, but had to check my email first. This is just in from Kimberly at About.com. This is EXCELLENT, and couldn't let you pass up reading it. Please follow the link! -- Myrt :)

--------------------------------------------------------
5 Ways to Encourage People to Share
Kimberly Powell, Genealogy Blog

--------------------------------------------------------
"We've all been there. Tracked down a family bible only to learn that the distant cousin who possesses it won't let anyone else take a look. Or discovered a possible genealogical connection on the Internet only to find that our new "cousin" won't divulge their sources. There are steps you can take to help convince people to share their genealogy files and records." See:
http://genealogy.about.com/od/help/a/sharing.htm

Wednesday, April 13, 2005


Off to Ormond Beach, Bradenton & SRQ



DearREADERS,

Ol' Myrt will be away from her desk for a few days.



On Thursday, 14 April 2004, I'll be visiting with the Halifax Genealogical Society which meets at the Ormond Beach Public Library on 30 South Beach Street beginning at 1:30pm. A few of us will meet for lunch at Chili's just off the exit #268 of I-95 at 11:30am for lunch. My topic will be "REVOLUTIONARY WAR ANCESTORS." Contact: Kathy Stickney
Clyde.P.Stickney@Dartmouth.EDU 



Saturday will find ol' Myrt here doing a presentation at the Mary Todd Lincoln Ten #10 Daughters of Union Veterans in Bradenton, FL on the subject of "MEDICAL PRACTICES OF THE US REVOLUTIONARY & CIVIL WAR PERIODS." This group meets at the Manatee County public library on 26th Street West at 1pm. Contact: Linda Smith
Llsdarien@aol.com 



Sunday I'll be speaking at the Jewish Genealogical Society of Sarasota at 1pm on the topic of "WINTER OF OUR DISCONTENT: #-months to better organization." This group meets at the Sarasota-Manatee Jewish Community Center, 582 S. McIntosh Rd., Sarasota. Contact: Kim Sheintal
klapshein@aol.com 



I expect to be back at my desk on Monday. 



YES, Gloria and Marilyn, I'm snail-mailing the backordered "ACCESSING THE PUBLISHED PENNSYLVANIA ARCHIVES ONLINE" DearMYRTLE little books you ordered. I'll drop them off at the Post Office on my way out of town in the morning!



Happy family tree climbing!

Myrt :)

DearMYRTLE,

6023 26th Street West PMB 352

Bradenton, FL 34207

http://www.DearMYRTLE.com 

ACROSS MY DESK:
1841 English Census -- now Online

This just in from Jane Hewitt. Myrt :)
From: Jane Hewitt jane@origins.net
Sent: Friday, April 08, 2005 11:52 AM
1841 English Census -- England's First -- now Online!


-Another generation of census data available exclusively at British Origins

These are exciting times for genealogists and family historians. Hot on the heels of the 1861 census, the earliest name-inclusive census of England is now available on British Origins at http://www.britishorigins.com. While the ancient Egyptians and the Babylonians were conducting censuses long before Joseph and Mary returned to Bethlehem for the census there, England had
to wait till 1841. English genealogy researchers who had previously to scroll through miles of microfilm can now, with the click of a mouse, take their family trees back another couple of generations.

People are becoming more and more interested in how their ancestors lived - what they did, what the social conditions were like - and are increasingly aware that they need to look beyond birth, marriage and death records. Census records don't just allow you to put family units together - parents, children, and other relatives - but identify servants, and give occupations. So you get a picture of people's lives from their occupations and the type and number of servants, eg personal maid, housemaid, upper floor maid, cook, groom. Rat catchers and lamplighters are in stark contrast to the professions of today.

Researchers using the 1841 England and Wales Census can unveil the lives of prominent figures from this period, such as John Russell, more commonly known as 'Jack Russell' who created the self - named famous breed of dog.

Jack Russell, a parson in Swimbridge and also a keen Devon huntsman, was pre-occupied with the idea of creating the perfect hunting dog .When he was given a dog whilst studying in Oxford, he bred it with a Devon hunt terrier and the Jack Russell terrier breed was created (also know for some time as a Parson Terrier). His entry can be found within the Devon records of the England and Wales 1841 Census.

The Origins Network, specialists in British and Irish genealogy, provide exclusive access to a rich and growing collection of records which put flesh on the bones of one's ancestors. These include a unique collection of apprenticeship records, which identify the apprentice's father or mother, where
they lived, what their occupation was, to whom and where the apprentice moved, and the trade into which they were apprenticed. There were a surprising number of women apprentices entering many different trades, including tilers and bricklayers, armourers and braziers, founders, fletchers and pin makers.

Many of the records tell true and personal stories. Applications for militia service are particularly rich. The 1904 application of John Byrne, of Clonmel, Co. Tipperary, to join the South Tipperary Artillery tells us, under "next of kin", that he had a brother in Plymouth, Devon, two sisters in Chicago, and three sisters in Queensland. The 1894 application of Joseph Hogan, of Liverpool, who joined the Royal Lancaster regiment, informs us that he was born in Hyderabad, India, was a musician who had worked or studied with a Mr Heintzman in Toronto the year before, had served in the Derbyshire Regiment for 12 years before that (so had clearly been boy soldier), transferred to the Wicklow Artillery militia in 1895, and bought himself out of a 6-year engagement in 1897. (Was this to get married?).

Joseph was 5 ft 5 in tall, weighed 133 lbs, had a chest measurement of 34½ inches, fair complexion, dark blue eyes, and light brown hair. Truly putting "flesh on the bones".

Wills are a well-known source, and British Origins provides exclusive access to some of greatest UK sources. Wills provide information on the kind of property your ancestors owned, how much money they had, who they left it to. For example, Robert Goodwin's 1803 will showed that he left money to three illegitimate daughters, by two North American Indian mothers, and to an illegitimate son. The 1731 will of Nicholas Foster, of Riccall, Yorkshire, was signed "his mark", indicating that Nicholas was illiterate. He was not a well-off man, leaving only a guinea each to his four children, Thomas, John, Anne and Suzanna, and everything else to his wife, also Suzanna.

A further new addition to The Origins Network, an index to petitions to Trinity House for charitable aid by disabled seamen or their widows, provides access to an extraordinary amount of genealogical information. The petitions, covering the period 1787 to 1854, give a career history for the seaman, names and ages of his dependants, and other documents typically including baptismal and marriage certificates. For example, Emily Darnell's petition of November 1851 shows that her husband, Thomas, went to sea aged 10, serving for 24 years, lastly as master of the 113 ton coasting vessel Caroline, before being lost at sea in "the Gale of 25 September", leaving 5 children under 14 years: Thomas (10), Emily (9), Elizabeth (5), Harry (3) and Ann (1). A
ccompanying documents include baptismal and marriage certificates, the latter showing that Emily's father, James Artis, of Warntham, was a bricklayer, while Thomas's father, William, was
also a Yarmouth sea captain; strangely, Emily's birth certificate gives her father's name as Joseph Artis. Many of the seamen fought or were taken prisoner during the Napoleonic Wars.

Put together all these records and we have, not just names on a piece of paper, but the beginning of bringing our ancestors back to life. However to make the picture even richer British Origins is augmented by a wonderful gallery, containing rare 19th century books, photographs, maps and gazetteers.

In addition to British Origins, The Origins Network also offers unique Irish genealogy collections via Irish Origins (http://www.irishorigins.com) including census records, wills, military papers, Irish/USA emigration boat passenger lists, town plans, and more, as well as an Irish gallery featuring books,
photos, maps and other rich vintage material from Ireland.

With all this information on line it is increasingly easy to make your ancestors become real people. We can build up a legacy to pass on to future generations from our armchair.

--------------------------------------------------------
About The Origins Network (www.originsnetwork.com)
--------------------------------------------------------

The Origins Network (formerly Origins.net), specialists in British and Irish genealogy, was founded in 1997 and offers online access to some of the richest ancestral information available for genealogy research at http://www.originsnetwork.com

Origins Network services include subscription access to exclusive English genealogy related collections on British Origins (http://www.britishorigins.com) and to Irish genealogy related collections on Irish Origins (http://www.irishorigins.com), expert Scottish Old Parish records
research on Scots Origins (http://www.scotsorigins.com), plus Free access to a state-of-the-art specialized search engine for genealogy, Origin Search (http://www.originsearch.com).

Genealogical data unique to The Origins Network includes Irish and English census records (including exclusive access to the 1841 English census - England's first), marriage registers, wills, valuation records, emigration passenger lists, court and apprentice records, as well as images such as original survey maps and vintage photographs. Most of this information is not available anywhere else on the internet.

Partnerships with leading archives and genealogical societies in the UK and Ireland, including the Society of Genealogists, Eneclann Ltd, The National Library of Ireland, and the Borthwick Institute for Archives, allow The Origins Network to provide exclusive online access to key sources, with an increasing emphasis on access to primary records, and to material which puts the "flesh on your ancestors bones."

For all enquiries, please contact:
Jane Hewitt, Origins Network, 12 Greenhill Rents, London, UK EC1M 6BN
jane@origins.net - phone: +44 (0)207 2516117


Tuesday, April 12, 2005

READERS' FEEDBACK: 12 April 2005

-- Re: Creating webpages and need good site
-- Re: Number of those in genealogy
-- Re: Revolutionary War Troop Movements
-- Problems with the NA microfilm lending program


--------------------------------------------------------
RE: CREATING WEB PAGES & NEED A GOOD SITE
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/0417.htm
--------------------------------------------------------

From: ceil_wendt_jensen cjensen@mipolonia.net
DearMYRTLE,
Colleagues should also check their AOL and Comcast (or other cable provider) service. They have free webspace and templates and not be aware of it.
Ceil Wendt Jensen, CGRS (sm)
Michigan Polonia http://mipolonia.net/

From: Jknitl@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
Just read your article about this. I have used both Tripod and Geocities. Both are free and very easy to use.
-- http://www.tripod.com
-- http://www.geocities.com/

You just have to sign up by creating a user name and password. With the free option you get about 15MB of space which is more than ample for most genealogy sites. My personal site is at http://www.geocities.com/jkpainter

--------------------------------------------------------
RE: NUMBER OF THOSE IN GENEALOGY
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/0416.htm
--------------------------------------------------------
From: jwcriner@mstar.net
We learned at our genealogy seminar that genealogy was the #2 most popular online. Unfortunately, pornography is #1.

--------------------------------------------------------
RE: REVOLUTIONARY WAY TROUP MOVEMENTS
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/0402.htm
--------------------------------------------------------

From: sallyeaton@myexcel.com
DearMYRTLE,
Wow! What a quick and expansive reply. I have been poking around at this for quite awhile and do have several of the references which you mentioned. However, there are several new ones which I am looking forward to pursuing. The one that really caught my eye was the US Army Military History Institute -
http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usamhi/.
I quickly went there and found the website a bit overwhelming but spent enough time experimenting with it to find a book of real interest: Colonel John Lamb's Second Continental Regiment of Artillery in the Revolution, 1775-1784 by Richard L. Pierson. This seems to be a photocopy of a 1988 draft of a manuscript. Do these books circulate through [ILL] Inter Library Loan? A note on a separate page said "regular circulation." I would LOVE to get my hands on that book.

NOTE FROM MYRT: Usually genealogy books are considered "reference". You'd have to contact the library in question regarding the title, before approaching your local public library to initiate a ILL request.

--------------------------------------------------------
PROBLEMS WITH NATIONAL ARCHIVES MICROFILM LENDING PROGRAM
RE: REVOLUTIONARY WAY TROUP MOVEMENTS
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/0402.htm
--------------------------------------------------------

From: sallyeaton@myexcel.com
DearMYRTLE,
On a different subject, I did recently try to get microfilm from the National Archives through the [Manatee Central Library.] Bradenton['s] main library. The staff at the library was very helpful, but the National Archives loan program is a mess. They couldn't even find two of the films I wanted, and it took them two months (and several phone calls from the librarian) to send the two that they did have. I had already started finding and ordering these same films through the local LDS FHC. Again, many thanks for your exceptionally quick and helpful reply.

NOTE FROM MYRT: I am wondering if the request was made during the past several years while the NARA was renovating the building in Pennsylvania Avenue. They've redesigned the research room, and moved it to the
first floor. Perhaps the service is better now that things are more on an even keel. Ordering a copy of the microfilm through your local LDS Family History Center is a great alternative, when the Family History Library has the collection. The FHL microfilm numbering system is different than the one used by NARA, so you'd have to look up films by place or keyword at:
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com