Monday, October 31, 2005

READERS INPUT: Memory Sticks

RE: Memory Stick Question
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com/05/1016.htm

From: JudiGalpin2@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,Not only have I scanned old family pictures to one memory stick, I have another that I have scanned the numerous birth and death certificates, obituaries, news articles, and other documents that I have collected over the years. I have the documents organized by category. It is so much easier to pull up a document from the stick rather than to dig through my files if I need to look at it again or if I want to copy it to share with another family member. It is also makes the documents available for the times that I am on the road (which is all the time as I travel for my work.) My memory sticks are 1GB each and I carry them with me at all times!

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From: Alice Sanders
DearMYRTLE,
I have a 1 GB memory stick with the entire genealogy file for my family lines and those also for my husband. I will be taking this memory stick with me on a research trip to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. Each of their computers has a USB port in case I want to check anything in my files. This is a lot easier and lighter to carry than the hard copy files of the past.

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From: Cis1052@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,Memory Sticks and digital [camera] cards are two totally different things. Memory sticks are used like CDs. My husband uses his for work so he can keep all his important papers on them and carry them from one customer to another. I use mine for backing up my database and all my photos that I have collected that pertain to genealogy. My daughter keeps all her photos, and she takes a lot of them, on one. My son, the chef, keeps all his recipes on his. The uses are endless for memory sticks. I really like them as they do not take up a lot of room. You can through them into a drawer and grab them on the fly. You can label them just like any thing else so you know what you have on it. A great addition to storage organization.

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DearREADERS,
Our students at Manatee Technical Institute keep their homework and class assignments on their memory sticks, which they wear on lanyards around their necks.

You may use a digital camera card like a memory stick, but they are not as universally interchangeable between computers unless the computer has a slot for the digital camera card. The memory sticks that plug directly into a USB port are the most universally accepted. Purchase the largest capacity you can afford.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
Scary Things

DearREADERS,
This Halloween, ol' Myrt here has been looking at things in a different light, in as much as she has 2 grandchildren to care for each day -- aged 12 weeks and 5 years. (OK that was a pretty good run-on sentence, wasn't it?!)

Scary things to these little ones are as innocent as a spider in the corner of the kitchen, or bedtime without prayers and a night light.

SCARY THINGS FOR GENEALOGISTS might include:


1. Finally receiving a copy of an out-of-print book on an obscure surname on your family tree, only to discover the author neglected to cite sources for events in each ancestor's life.

2. The loss of courthouse records due to fire or flood.

3. Finding that long lost ancestor only to discover he/she had led a notorious life of crime.

4. The elimination of free RootsWeb genealogy mailing lists for communicating with other researchers about surnames, localities and special interest groups.

5. A trip to the parish office in you ancestor's homeland reveals the page for his christening entry was literally torn out of the book. (sad but true)

6. A visit to the cemetery where the tombstones have been moved to the perimeter to facilitate lawn mowing.

7. Reading the federal census, page by page, only to discover ink blots obscuring the names of your ancestor's parents.

8. During a visit to the National Archives, you discover your ancestor's Civil War pension folder only holds a single file jacket.

9. Your ancestor's pre-Andrew Jackson federal land grant certificate has had the president's signature cut out of the document.

10. Your computer experiences a complete hard-drive failure without a backup of your genealogical database, digital ancestral photos and scanned images of important documents.

NOT TO WORRY some of these scary scenarios only add to the mysterious intrigue of determining alternative record collections. Item #3 only requires an attitude adjustment, since genealogists love searching for ancestors, and should learn to keep an open mind when it comes to judging their lifestyles.

But more importantly, if you want to sleep well without a night light, remember to BACKUP, BACKUP, BACKUP!

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
www.DearMYRTLE.com

Saturday, October 29, 2005

Myrt to speak 5 Nov - 10am Ogden, Utah

DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt here has been invited to speak at the Ogden Chapter of the Utah Genealogical Association on Saturday, the 5th of November 2005. My topic will be:

"WHY WE STILL NEED FAMILY HISTORY CENTERS"

10am
Ogden Utah Family History Center
539 24th Street
Ogden, Utah

It will be a joy to meet readers and podcast listeners in this neck of the woods. Hope you can stop by if you live in the area.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
www.DearMYRTLE.com

Monday, October 24, 2005

Posting to genealogy software

From: Valley Pierce
DearMYRTLE,
I have been involved in tracing my family history for over forty years. As such, I have over 60 three ring notebooks full of information which I have been attempting to put into a genealogy software program I purchased. There are twenty or more published books on the various families I have been working on with thousands of names. In order to put ALL this information into a software program I would have to devote years and years. My question is...where do you draw the line as to WHAT information you put into your program?

DearVALLEY,
First, let ol' Myrt here say "CONGRATS on being so organized!" 60 notebooks is mighty impressive. My personal recommendation is to type in the following information:

-- you
-- your spouse and children
-- include ALL source documents

THEN
-- your direct line ancestors (parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, etc.)
-- your spouse's direct line ancestors
-- include ALL source documents

THEN
-- at least 4 generations of the siblings siblings of your ancestors so you can increase the likelihood of making a "cousin match" with someone who has perhaps MORE information on distant generations.

I use sticky notes of two types:

-- One to mark the page in the notebook I am working, so I can immediately open to the correct page.
-- The second (with a hand-drawn arrow) where on the page I had transcribed last. -- IE. his military service record, or land entry, etc.

Try not to burn out -- pace yourself to only 3-5 people per session or per week, depending on how much documentation you have to enter for each person. GOOD LUCK!!

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
www.DearMYRTLE.com
New Certified Genealogist Terms

From the Board for Certification website:
http://www.bcgcertification.org/pressrelease.htm

BCG Press Release
17 October 2005
BCG Credentials
For immediate release
For additional information contact:
Connie Lenzen, CG, at clenzen@dialoregon.net

The Board for Certification of Genealogists announced that, effective immediately, it has consolidated three research categories into one category that will be called Certified GenealogistSM. All those holding a current credential as Certified Genealogical Records SpecialistSM, Certified Lineage SpecialistSM, or Certified GenealogistSM will hold the designation of Certified GenealogistSM. The board also established application requirements for the single credential and voted to continue the existing renewal requirements for those already certified.

The Board reached the decisions after extensive talks at the annual meeting of the Board of Trustees in Salt Lake City on October 16. Incoming board president Connie Miller Lenzen, CGSM, of Portland, Oregon, explained that the change has been made for two reasons. “First, regardless of the type of work they do, all genealogists have the same skills. Second, having three research categories was confusing to both the genealogical community and the general public. The categories were different, but the differences were not well understood. We expect that the public can now more easily hire a certified person without being concerned about the differences. The one thing that will not change is the Board’s commitment to excellence in genealogical work.”

In May 2004, the Trustees approved the following motion, Lenzen continued: “Anyone demonstrating competence in all general skill areas of research, evidence analysis, kinship determination, and reporting should be eligible for certification as a genealogist, without further distinction or limitation. Upon implementation, all certified persons in any research category would hold the designation Certified GenealogistSM.” After more than a year of discussion, soliciting input, planning, and writing, the Board voted on the final draft of the revised application guide.

The new requirements have been designed to test the four skill areas used by all genealogists. The requirements are:
1. Acceptance of the Genealogist’s Code.
2. Background resume
3. Document work with a BCG-supplied document: transcribe, abstract, and evaluate the document, prepare a research plan.
4. Document work with an applicant-supplied document: transcribe, abstract, and evaluate the document, prepare a research plan
5. Research report prepared for a client
6. Case study of conflicting or indirect evidence
7. Kinship determination project. The project is to include at least three couples in successive ancestral generations. The project may be in the form of a narrative genealogy, narrative lineage, or narrative pedigree.

Complete details for each requirement will be posted on the BCG website, www.bcgcertification.org, by December 1 of this year. Beginning January 1, 2006, only applications using the new requirements will be accepted. The new BCG Application Guide will be available at the National Genealogical Society conference in Chicago in June 2006.

The trustees also determined that individuals certified by BCG will still need to renew their certification every five years and that requirements for renewal will remain the same as they are now, regardless of the certification category previously held. Those requirements include an updated resume and the submission of up to four work samples. Current holders of the CGRSSM and CLSSM credentials will have until November 1, 2006 to make the transition to the CGSM credential. BCG’s teaching categories, Certified Genealogical LecturerSM and Certified Genealogical InstructorSM, are not affected by the change to a single research credential.

Also unchanged is the two-step application process. Individuals file a preliminary application form and then have up to one year to submit their completed portfolio. Those who have already filed a preliminary application form will have the opportunity to decide whether to continue under the previous requirements or convert to the new requirements. Any preliminary applications filed on or after January 1, 2006 must follow the new requirements.

Since its founding in 1964, The Board for Certification of Genealogists has promulgated--in research, lectures, and publications--attainable, uniform standards of competence and ethics that have become generally accepted throughout the field. Its publication, The BCG Genealogical Standards Manual, sets forth the currently accepted standards for all areas of genealogical research.

Wednesday, October 12, 2005

When it rains and shirtsleeves

DearREADERS,

Remember the old adage "what it rains, it pours..."

Well, at the risk of wearing my heart on my shirtsleeve, I must explain I am flying out to Salt Lake City immediately to be there for my daughter (the young mother of a 2 month old and a 5 year old) who was injured in a car accident. I had been saying I wanted to move out to Salt Lake, but this is a ridiculous way to get there. Carrie is out of surgery, but not able to speak. It will take a while before she can walk again.

I have cancelled my appointments and speaking engagements through December 2005, arranging for substitutes to not leave anyone in a lurch. By Nov 15th I'll know which end is up, and what to do about my other Florida speaking engagements (Jan & Feb 2006.) It may be that I can complete this when home to pack up for the final move. I will be in St. George for the February 2006 Genealogy Jamboree.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
How to convert VHS tapes to DVD

DearREADERS,
Every now and then CNET comes up with another free class that I simply must tell you about. This one is important if you wish to preserve the VHS tapes. YES, I know that the lifespan of DVDs is also suspect. You'll just have to keep converting to the newest technology until you pass these down to the younger generation. Why not do it NOW? Pass out copies during the next family get-together?


HOW TO CONVERT VHS tapes to DVD
http://vhs-dvd-movies.workshops.help.com/
"Get complete step-by-step instructions for preserving your old videos on DVD in this FREE class. You've spent years carefully recording birthdays, weddings, vacations, and more on videotape. Now the tapes are fading fast and VCRs are becoming dinosaurs, abandoned in favor of digital-format DVDs.

The solution: Convert your VHS tapes into digital format and burn them to DVDs. It's easier than you think, and CNET's FREE new course delivers complete instructions on how to do it. You'll also learn how to enhance your original tapes by editing the audio and video, adding still images and transition effects, and deleting unwanted scenes."

NOTE: "Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday from October 17 to November 4 , we will post a new assignment that relates to a particular lesson."

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OTHER CLASSES THAT MIGHT INTEREST YOU
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-- SCANNING PHOTO BASICS. (Get those old family photos scanned once and for all after taking this class.) http://photo-scan-basics.workshops.help.com/

-- PLAN YOUR HOME NETWORK. (Myrt has one so that 3 computers can be online at the same time.) http://plan-home-networking.workshops.help.com/

-- TAKE YOUR MP3 PLAYER ON THE ROAD. (If you want to listen to DearMYRTLE's FAMILY HISTORY HOUR by hooking your iPod up to your car's radio. It works the same with other .mp3 players.) http://mp3-car.workshops.help.com/

-- SEND EMAIL FROM YOUR MOBILE PHONE. http://email-smartphone.workshops.help.com/

-- DIGITAL MUSIC MADE EASY. (Myrt's weekly podcast is just like downloading some music files -- except it's genealogy how-to interviews and advice.) http://digital-music-guide.workshops.help.com/

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HOW TO ENROLL
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Visit the CNET link and click the "ENROLL NOW" button. Then revisit the site each week, as indicated in the schedule for the class you wish to take.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Tuesday, October 11, 2005

DearMYRTLE's FAMILY HISTORY HOUR 11 Oct 2005

DearREADERS,
This is the lineup for this week's show, now available for you to listen to 24/7. Please also note the "Links We Mention" and "Listening to the Show" directions below. I think you'll enjoy hearing my guests this week!

-- Frank Koerner, B.S. Physics, Juris Doctorate, author of The Missing Peace of a Heritage Puzzle: A Memoir Uniquely Set in a Vanished Sudetenland Frank was born and raised in New Jersey, but his parents were immigrants from Moravia.

-- Colleen Fitzpatrick, Ph. D., author of Forensic Genealogy available through her website
http://forensicgenealogy.info/
Colleen explains that "Forensic Genealogy will give you a sense of coming from a long line of real people who are not just names on a page."

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MIGHTYMOUSE TOUR
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This week Myrt explains the process for bypassing the semi-reliable email delivery of her columns in favor of her BLOG. Just what are BLOGs anyway?

-- SharpReader (to pull the blogs in to your computer)
http://www.SharpReader.com
-- DearMYRTLE's Blog (RSS/XML) Feed: http://dearmyrtle.blogspot.com/atom.xml
-- Dick Eastman's Blog (RSS/XML) Feed:
http://eogn.com/index.rdf

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LINKS WE MENTION
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-- Anna Madgigine Jai Kingsley: African Princess, Florida Slave, Plantation Slaveowner by Daniel L. Schafer. University Press of Florida: March 2003. ISBN: 0813026164.

-- Wal-Mart Online Photo Center
http://www.walmart.com/photo-center?path=0%3A5426&dept=5426

-- Gmail:
http://gmail.google.com

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LISTENING TO THE SHOW
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-- PREFERRED Automatic PodCast - Receive each week's file automatically as a PodCast (using iTunes, etc.) by subscribing to the podcast using the following code:
http://www.ourmedia.org/mediarss/user/33644

-- Listen-as-you-click Method #1 - OurMedia.org This link opens another webpage, with an online audio player. See:
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1011r.htm

-- Listen-as-you-click Method #2 - Archives.org This link downloads the file, then opens your computer's default .mp3 player. See: http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1011r.htm

If you wish to learn more about how to receive DearMYRTLE's Family History Hour automatically as a podcast (to hear on any .mp3 player) see detailed directions at: http://www.DearMYRTLE.com/listenhow.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Monday, October 10, 2005

NEED READERS' INPUT: Memory Stick Question

From: Chuck FitzGerald
cdfitzg@chilitech.net
DearMYRTLE,
One of the more economical devices on the market these days is the "memory stick." I was very interested in having the capability to load a Scan Disk 512MB unit with my PAF 5.2 database in seconds, and be able to walk next door (to my daughter's home) and dump the database into her computer in seconds. This provided a second home for our precious family history, and the ability to do the same thing for my grandkids.

My question? What else can be done with the memory stick? What am I missing? Have any of your correspondents suggested other brilliant uses for this type of tool? I have one of the units (containing my family database) in the vault at our bank. Is it adequately protected or does it need something extra/special?

DearREADERS,

My friend Chuck has some great questions. His computer has a "card reader" that accepts his camera's "scan disk" that's the 512MB card he talked about. Then files (not just photo files) can be saved to it, sort-of like a floppy disk, but with much greater capacity.

I used to use the extra card for my camera to carry the preferred photos to Wal-Mart to have them print out higher quality photos than I can get with my HP 5510 all-in-one. I say USED to, because Wal-Mart will allow you to upload the files directly via their website for pick-up later in the day at a store location you specify.

In our family we tend to use our Gmail accounts to receive those high quality images our 5-7MB digital cameras are making by default. We opt NOT to send the files through traditional email accounts (like AOL) that usually compress or resize each file to expedite email delivery and keep costs of email server space to a minimum. The smaller images also have lower image quality than the original shot, and we wanted to avoid that.

So, DearREADERS, have you been using your digital camera's spare memory sticks for anything else?

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

The NEW Library in downtown SLC

DearREADERS,

In the last five minutes, while working on tomorrow's podcast, I've received 8 emails from folks asking if there is going to be a new Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. The answer is no.

"The NEW 250,000-square-foot LDS Church History Library will sit at northeast corner of North Temple and Main Street in Salt Lake. It will house the growing historical collection, which currently includes 3.5 million manuscripts, 210,000 publications, 100,000 photographs and 50,000 audiovisual productions."

For more information see:

Deseret Morning News - 8 October 2005
LDS Church breaks ground for library
By Amelia Nielson-Stowell
http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,615156278,00.html

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
SEE DICK about French-Canadian Research

DearREADERS,

French-Canadian research is close to the top of my list of genealogical research with which I have no experience. But Dick Eastman is 50% French-Canadian, so I take him at his word in particular on that subject. I was thrilled to read his weekly newsletter and make note of a detailed report on this topic. For instance, I didn't know that:

-- "French-Canadian research is greatly facilitated by the excellent Catholic church records that were kept." I always thought it was hard to do Canadian research.

-- The library of the American-Canadian Genealogical Society in Manchester, New Hampshire has 1.5 terabytes of records that were microfilmed by the Institut Généalogique Drouin.
If you have French-Canadian ancestry, you simply must view the entire article:
http://eogn.typepad.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2005/10/one_and_a_half_.html

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
Reading & Listening to DearMYRTLE

DearREADERS,

Someone just asked me why my columns aren't on AOL anymore. Times change. It’s a broader audience out here on the internet. I am thankful to AOL, and in particular the Genealogy Forum that used to be available on America Online, for giving me a place to start. I treasure many friendships made in those early days in 1995.

YES, it has been nearly 11 years since DearMYRTLE was first "invented." I remember working through to pick the DearMYRTLE screen name with George Ferguson on the telephone line. (My original choice was "AuntHarriet" but someone on AOL already had that name.) I was thrilled to use DearMYRTLE, since Myrtle is my paternal grandmother's given name. Then George and I sent old-timey pictures back and forth, until we settled on the one I use in the upper left corner of each page on my website.

But ol' Myrt here began onlining back in the winter of 1984-85 when I signed online with my Commodore 64 computer. It had a 300 baud modem which is simply archaic by today's terms. The grandparent of AOL was called Q-link, and there was a small genealogy group that met there. Our fearless leader was Russ Kyger, and that's where I met Terry Morgan, Bertha Bealle and another gal named Romary. They are among my oldest online genealogy friends. Russ lived in the next county in Maryland, so we met at the Library of Congress early on; but I didn't meet Terry until 12 years later when I spoke at a NGS Conference in Nashville, Tennessee.

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READ DearMYRTLE COLUMNS
--------------------------------------------------------
Ol' Myrt here is currently contributing new articles for distribution in print to:
-- EVERTON'S GENEALOGICAL HELPER MAGAZINE
For more info see:
http://www.Everton.com

Myrt's periodic (usually daily) genealogy "how-to" columns are available free through the following online resources:
-- DearMYRTLE's BLOG
-- DearMYRTLE's WEBSITE
-- DearMYRTLE's ANCESTRY MESSAGE BOARD
-- DearMYRTLE's ROOTSWEB MAILING LIST

For more info see:
-- Blog & Mailing List:
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com/signupwelcome.htm
-- Message Board: http://www.DearMYRTLE.com.com/ask.htm

To SEARCH DearMYRTLE's columns for previous postings see:
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com/search.htm

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LISTEN TO DearMYRTLE's FAMILY HISTORY HOUR
--------------------------------------------------------
Ol' Myrt here first began radio broadcasts on a small Sarasota AM station in January 2000. It was usually simulcast over the internet via an old, expensive method called "internet radio streaming." Within six months, DearMYRTLE's FAMILY HISTORY HOUR internet radio show began broadcasting only over the internet, but costs of production and equipment were a challenge. By the time the hurricanes struck Florida in the summer of 2004, DearMYRTLE was also producing a 30 minute daily internet radio stream. At the time, each Tuesday night show was broadcast live over 12 different internet radio platforms that totaled 800,000 to a million listener streams per show. Costs and equipment were an enormous investment. Listeners had to tune in at a specific time each Tuesday to catch the show, which was hard for folks in France or Australia. Time zone differences were quite a problem in our global community.

THAT WAS THEN, THIS IS NOW. Podcasting has become the norm; file storage is now free and the cost to distribute is nil because bandwidth is now free. Availability has increased to 24 hours 7 days a week, which accommodates all time zones. You can also use any type of .mp3 player, like an iPod, or you may simply listen to the show using your computer. The shows can automatically download using something like iTunes to pull in the file. Alternately, you can go to DearMYRTLE.com and click to listen to each show whenever you want, as many times as you want.

To view the current list of shows in .mp3 format see:
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com/listen.htm

PODCASTS ARE NEAT. Its especially cool that you can pause (to talk on the phone) and rewind/play (to determine what in heaven's name was just said.) Also you can transfer the podcast from your computer to your portable .mp3 player every time you hook it up to your computer. Even my sister Sharon (who doesn't really like genealogy) can do it. She has an iPod for her favorite music, and a typical show is just like adding 10 or 12 music files to your iPod.

Myrt currently recommends downloading and installing the free iTunes software. Then click "Advanced" and then select "subscribe to podcast" and insert
http://www.ourmedia.org/mediarss/user/33644 Then click the OK button. Periodically when you open iTunes, click the "update" button in the upper right, to have it automatically look for the latest podcast from DearMYRTLE.

For more info on how to receive the podcast automatically:
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com/listenhow.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Sunday, October 09, 2005

ACROSS MY DESK: Scout digs up family history

DearREADERS,
Remember when ol' Myrt here suggested that a small Texas cemetery could be adopted by a Boy Scout for his Eagle Scout Project? Well, it happened in Denmark. (Denmark, Tennessee, that is.) Be sure to read the full story as it has some pictures and tells how this young man is working to have 4 tombstones returned from the "Pink Palace Museum." BRAVO!

Cemetery project leads to discovery of ancestors' tombstones
By TYRONE TONY REED JR.
ttreed@jacksonsun.com

DENMARK - "A mother's search for the final resting places of distant relatives led her 13-year-old son on a quest to repair and restore 150-year-old tombstones Saturday in a Denmark cemetery. Allison Climer, of Bells, said it all began with her lifelong interest in genealogy, which caused her son, Trey, a Boy Scout, to also develop an interest."

FULL STORY:
http://www.jacksonsun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051009/NEWS01/510090311/1002

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
READERS' FEEDBACK: Foster child, 1880 & Mental Institutions

FOSTER CHILD YEARNS FOR FAMILY HISTORY
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1009.htm
From: Peggy
DearMYRTLE,
Just for the "heck" of it, Mary Jane could place a note on the FITZGERALD mailing list at
http://www.rootsweb.com. Maybe there just might be someone there who wants to converse with her, in addition to all the ideas you have given her. Thank you for the tip about the Social Security Death Index prior to 1969. I did not know those people would not be listed, although some are once in a while. Thank you for your wonderful work as usual. -- Peggy, Janesville, WI

DearPEGGY,

We're eternally greatful to those who heard the Social Security Administration was just throwing out info on deceased citizens. They rallied forces to put a stop to the practice. The SSDI is how I discovered my maternal grandfather passed away. Lowell S. Froman had been divorced from my grandmother Frances Irene Goering since before I was born. He had not kept in touch with my mom. Neither of us knew until I searched the SSDI that he died in 1989.


--------------------------------------------------------
ACCESSING 1880 & OTHER CENSUS VIEWS
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1010.htm

From: RMcfa45544@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
If you can afford about $200, Ancestry is worth it in the census. I have taken several folks records back about four or five generations for them.


DearRM,
Full access to all Ancestry.com databases currently runs about that amount annually. See: <
http://landing.ancestry.com/multisubs/subscribe.aspx>
That currently includes:
-- OneWorldTreeSM – Matching just one name could add branches to your family tree.
-- US Federal Census Collection – Access US Census records from 1790 to 1930.
-- US Records Collection – View birth, marriage, death, and military records.
-- US Immigration Collection – Find an ancestor’s country of origin or birthplace.
-- UK & Ireland Collection – Find baptism, christening, marriage and burial records.

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RE: JACKSONVILLE STATE HOSPITAL IN ILLINOIS
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1011.htm

From: GWINNALICE@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
In a message dated 10/8/2005 7:36:06 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com writes:
-- Illinois State Archives - RECORD GROUP 252.000 - Jacksonville Mental Health and Developmental Center
<
http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/di/252__002.htm>

You gave me a good idea for finding more info on my grandfather who died in Elgin, Kane County, Illinois in 1910. Do you know if the Record Group is the same for that hospital in that year? It was also a state hospital for the insane (at least my ancestor died of that.) Thanks for your great work!

DearGWINN,
The webpage in question had a link to the TABLE OF CONTENTS <
http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/di/toc.htm>
for the Illinois State Archives. Indeed, I've located the record group for the "Elgin Mental Health Center" <
http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/di/256__002.htm#A1> in this listing of State Institutions. Record groups numbers vary for different care centers, as indicated below. Isn't the internet wonderful?!!

251.000 – Illinois School for the Deaf
252.000 – Jacksonville Mental Health and Developmental Center
254.000 – Lincoln Developmental Center
255.000 – Illinois Soldiers' and Sailors' Children's School
256.000 – Elgin Mental Health Center
258.000 – Kankakee Developmental Center
259.000 – Illinois Veterans' Home
260.000 – Illinois Soldiers' Widows' Home
261.000 – Peoria State Hospital
262.000 – East Moline Mental Health Center
263.000 – Alton Mental Health Center
264.000 – Chicago State Hospital
265.000 – Dixon Developmental Center
266.000 – Institute for Juvenile Research
267.000 – Galesburg Mental Health Center
268.000 – Herrick House Children's Center

--------------------------------------------------------
RE: JACKSONVILLE STATE HOSPITAL IN ILLINOIS
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1011.htm
From: Rhonda Houston
DearMYRTLE,
From my experience looking for my great-great-grandmother in California, who had a physical problem with her eyes that compliated all the rest of her equal librium, seeing things well and of course, her view on life would have been different from the rest of the population and appeared very strange to those who obvserved her, including her own family at about this same time frame.

Those records for her were destroyed and once in those days, it was very easy to get someone in to one of those institutions for any reason unscientifically presented, and almost impossible to get them unadmitted. In those days, there was no need to keep these records at the local, county, state level. This was a 'holding tank' for those who no one could assess their problem and anyone could be admitted easily. Since the study of psychology and any that related to; it is only today that we recognize records should have been recognized and kept.

The one thing that this insitution had, was a stigma for holding those that were 'deviant to the culture at large', so you see, there was really no logical 'then' or reason for these records to be held and kept. I was terribly disappointed at the end of my search because this ancestor had dropped off the face of the earth and was never heard of again.

--------------------------------------------------------
RE: JACKSONVILLE STATE HOSPITAL IN ILLINOIS
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1011.htm
From: Dittmar, Frederick M. dittmar_ksa@ou.edu
DearMYRTLE,
One of these days I may call you Pat but Myrt sounds like a nickname now. I love it the way you go out of your way when you answer a question. With Gretchen you answered the question and then expanded with the links and a summary with the value of each. WOW what a lady. -- One question I have is does the town/county local genealogical society have any records of burials or a cemetery used by the hospital? In Norman, the Cleveland County Genealogical Society has the cemetery records for the local State Hospital Cemetery. Just a thought.

DearFRED (not Frank!)
You are right to bring up that the records we seek aren't always placed in the logical spot. When the Hillsborough County, Florida marriage records were being thrown out, Thomas Jay Kemp rescued them. Now he is at Godfrey.org, but at the time he was the Special Collections Librarian at the University of South Florida, Tampa. We pray there are like-minded individuals in the towns, counties, provinces and countries where our ancestors once lived.

This past week I attended a genealogy society meeting where the speaker Walt Stock, formerly of the Free Library of Philadelphia, stated that it doesn't matter where you are accustomed to finding records. When you get to a new area for your ancestral quest you "must find the local genealogy guru." He added that the person usually has cobwebs all over. I thought that was a cute way to get the point across. Records of our elusive ancestors can be most anywhere. Its just a matter of persistent searching.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Saturday, October 08, 2005

Jacksonville State Hospital in Illinois

From:
DearMYRTLE,
My great-great-grandfather's brother, Herman Tellbuescher was in an asylum Jacksonville, Illinois. From what I have been told he died there. Later this turned into Jacksonville State Hospital, since then it has been closed. I went to the court house in Jacksonville but they had no record of his death. I have inquired as to what happened to the records there and no one seems to know. Do you have any suggestions on how to locate this information? Or how I can find out where he was buried? Thank you for any assistance you can give me.

DearGRETCHEN,

Folks who work in a county facility may not be required to know what's available at the state level. It takes an old timer, who has an interest, to remember such details. Google returned a lot of hits for "Illinois State Hospital" including:

A lithograph of the Jacksonville State Hospital
http://www.mantenostatehospital.com/jacksonville.html
This page has a link titled "JACKSONVILLE STATE HOSPITAL PATIENTS 1854 - 1870" Transcribed by Shirley Aleguas . See the website at: http://www.rootsweb.com/%7Eilmaga/morgan2/statehosp/mc-sh_adm.html
A review of the letter "T" did not turn up Herman Tellbuescher, or anyone one with the first name Herman. Its possible that Shirley hasn't transcribed the years your 2nd great-grandfather's brother was in residence.

My guess would be that the state hospital records are at the state level, not at the county courthouse.

--------------------------------------------------------
THE NEXT STEP
--------------------------------------------------------
Ol' Myrt here decided to go back and read the original page more closely:
http://www.mantenostatehospital.com/jacksonville.html, which states in tiny letters near the bottom the information on this page was obtained from these resources:

The Simmons College Archives
300 The Fenway
Boston, MA 02115
http://www.simmons.edu/

Illinois State Markers: First Illinois State Hospital for the Insane
http://www.historyillinois.org/frames/markers/84.htm

Illinois State Archives
RECORD GROUP 252.000 - JACKSONVILLE MENTAL HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENTAL CENTER
http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/di/252__002.htm
By visiting the Illinois State Archives site listed above, ol' Myrt here was able to locate the following sub-group of interest in your case.

-- 252.004 REGISTER OF PATIENTS. November 3, 1851-July 19, 1897. 2 vols. No index.
"Register entries for each patient include register number, name, age, sex, marital status, number of children, birthplace, county of residence, occupation, religion (occasional), date of admission, duration of insanity before admission, number of attacks, supposed cause, and date and reason for discharge. Remarks on prior institutionalization, subsequent admissions, and family background occasionally are included."

Looks like you need to make a trip to the Illinois State Archives, as there are in-house census records of the hospital, and death records, etc. Records appear intermittently for the death certificates themselves.

Illinois State Archives
Margaret Cross Norton Building
Capitol Complex
Springfield, IL 62756

Hours:
Monday–Friday 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. (Central Time Zone)
Saturday 8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. (except on holiday weekends)

A note on the archives' contact page states "please call the Archives Reference Desk at (217) 782-4866 before any Saturday visit to arrange for use of records housed in the Archives stacks." This means that the boxes are pulled Mon-Fri only.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Accessing 1880 & other census views

From: Sharon Henke
DearMYRTLE,
You wrote:
"1880 US Index free at
http://www.FamilySearch.org with links to free 1880 Census images at Ancestry.com"

In smaller print at the end of the Census page it says "View for a fee." The images on Ancestry.com are not free, except to subscribers.

DearSHARON,

Oops, both of us have made slight mistakes. Thank-you for correcting me, the link says "for a fee" EXCEPT if one is logged in to FamilySearch.org as a member of the Church. Then the clickable link icon says "view images at Ancestry.com" and provides free access.

As always, the 1880 as with the other AncestryPlus databases and scanned images IS FREE to anyone at your local LDS Family History Center if it has high-speed and has opted for the free AncestryPlus membership available to FHCs. Public and private libraries that elect to subscribe to AncestryPlus also provide access to patrons for free.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Friday, October 07, 2005

Foster child yearns for family history

From: Mary Jane

DearMYRTLE,
My father is from Virginia, and the family is no longer living. I was raised in foster care since the age of 3 until I turned 18. I am now 39 and have started searching for his family, etc. My mother says that my father's parents never talked about their life in Virginia and the children are no longer living.

Virginia didn't keep records of birth at the time my (paternal) grandmother was born. According to my father's birth certificate his mother was born in VA. bet. 1903-1904, but then her obit says she was born in 1899. That's a big difference of the 2 years listed. She also used 2 different names:
-- Ethel Fitzgerald
-- May Fitzgerald

We believe her name was Ethel May Fitzgerald. I am trying to find her parents.

My Dad's father is shown as unknown on birth certificate. We believe his name was Jasper Clinton Sanders/Saunders. His obit lists his D.O.B. as July 5, 1879 in VA. I can't seem to find him after 1930 census when he moved here in PA. He died Dec. 29, 1956 in PA. His death certificate shows his father as Jason, but can't find a Jason Sanders/Saunders in VA. I can't find a marriage records anywhere. I thought maybe they married in PA, W.Va., or VA. I also can't find a SS# for them. Any other advice or help? I have an online friend that has been trying to help me and suggested that I email you.

DearMARYJANE,

WELCOME to the wonderful (but challenging) world of family history research. A few quick comments, before I do some research for you:

-- You won't normally find a Social Security Death Index entry for people who died before 1969, because the earlier reports were not maintained in the current database available free online at places like
http://www.RootsWeb.com

-- Everton's HANDYBOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS states the "Archives Division of the Virginia State Library has copies of all existing Virginia Marriage Records 1853-1936. [...] Probate records are at the county level with the general court and at the county and circuit and superior court. Independent cities have probates at the circuit court clerk's office."

--------------------------------------------------------
ANCESTRY.COM's CENSUS VIEW
--------------------------------------------------------
Ol' Myrt here was able to locate this entry, which is quite possibly the JASPER & MAY SANDERS you mentioned:


US FEDERAL CENSUS 1930
Name: Jasper C Sanders
Age: 37
Estimated birth year: abt 1893
Birthplace: Virginia
Relation to head-of-house: Head
Spouse's Name: May Sanders
Race: White
Home in 1930: Monongahela, Greene County, Pennsylvania
Enumeration District 30-18, Sheet 17a page 69.
In the household we find:
-- May (wife, age 27, age at marriage 22, born in Virginia)
-- Rolland (son, age 2 8/12, born in Virginia)
-- Harry C (son, age 11/12, born in Pennsylvania)

The entry implies that the marriage took place 5 years earlier, most likely in Virginia since the bride and groom where born in Virginia and so was their first child. Now you don't know WHERE in Virginia to look, so let's see if we can find Jasper in the 1920 US Federal Census, as a child in his father's household.

--------------------------------------------------------
I AM NOT AT ALL CONCERNED ABOUT BIRTH YEARS BEING OFF AS MUCH AS 5 YEARS IN CENSUS RECORDS. Ancestry.com has just completed an every name index of the 1920, so I will look there next. But I'll check the ENTIRE US to see how many other teenagers by the name of "Jasper" or "JC" or "Jasper C" Sanders/Saunders are available. There were many entries (perhaps 30) but they usually had obvious miss-matches such as:


TOO OLD:
Jasper C Sanders - Oil Trough, Independence, Arkansas abt 1867 Arkansas White
Jasper Sanders - Maschulaville, Noxubee, Mississippi abt 1871 Mississippi White

TOO YOUNG:
Jasper C Sanders - Delaware, Defiance, Ohio abt 1917 Ohio White

POSSIBLE, BUT NOT VIRGINIA: (also James not Jasper)
James C Sanders - Wilson, Torrance, New Mexico abt 1908 Texas White

WHAT WAS THE ETHNIC GROUP?
Jasper Sanders - Hart, Yazoo, Mississippi abt 1910 Mississippi Black

--------------------------------------------------------
OK, I WILL NARROW THE SEARCH TO RESIDING IN
VIRGINIA IN 1920, again using Ancestry.com
--------------------------------------------------------
YES, we find that the handwritten "G" could just as easily be a "C" in the following entry:

Name: Jasper G Sanders
Age: 14 years
Estimated birth year: abt 1906
Birthplace: Virginia
Race: White
Home in 1920: Saltville, Washington, Virginia
Sex: Male
Marital status: Single
Relation to Head of House: Son
Able to read: Yes
Able to Write: Yes
Mother's Birth Place: Virginia
Father's Birth Place: Virginia

On viewing the 1920 census image online at Ancestry.com we see the other members of the household:
-- James S. Sanders (head of household, 51, born in Virginia, parents born in Virginia, a truck farmer)
-- Sarah E. (wife, 30, born in Virginia, parents born in Virginia)
-- Hector (son, 20, single, born in Virginia, parents born in Virginia)
-- Jasper C. (son, 14, single, born in Virginia, parents born in Virginia)
-- Ethel H or M (daughter, 12, single, born in Virginia, parents born in Virginia)
-- Francis (daughter 10, single, born in Virginia, parents born in Virginia)

With a wife clearly age 30, and James' son Hector listed as age 20, its most likely that Sarah is the 2nd wife, and perhaps not the mother of at least Hector. However, she could have married young and had Jasper at age 16. Don't count on it either way until you learn more about the family.

It is also interesting that "Ethel" a daughter of the same man that is the father of your ancestor Jasper C. And it is interesting that one interpretation of the handwriting was that the middle initial might be "M."

--------------------------------------------------------
WHAT TO DO NEXT
--------------------------------------------------------
1. Obtain copies of all census records working back as far as possible for James S. Saunders. Expect in 1910 he will just barely be married to Sarah and in 1900, he will probably have a different wife.

2. Search census images for 1900 census, before Ethel May was married. Some likely entries in Virginia (assuming that is her home state) include:
-- Ethel Fitzgerald - Bellefonte, Nottoway, Virginia abt 1898 Virginia Black Daughter
-- Ethel Mary Fitzgerald - South River, Augusta, Virginia abt 1893 Virginia White Daughter
-- May Lillie Fitzgerald - South River, Augusta, Virginia abt 1900 Virginia White Daughter
-- (There are other entries that seem less likely, but I didn't search beyond the state of Virginia.)

IF there was a difference in ethnic groups, that could be a reason for the family to keep things quiet. However, every family has upsets such as divorce or differences in political or religious persuasion that cause people not to talk of that particular branch of the family tree.

3. Look for marriage records. Use the localities of the census records to determine possible county courthouses to search for records. EVERTON'S HANDYBOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS explains: "Washington County was created 7 Cct 1776 from Fincastle. 216 Park Street, Abingdon, VA 24210-3312 Ph 540.628.8733. In 1974 nine square miles of Washington County were annexed to the city of Bristol, which is an independent city with its own clerks office and records. Washington County Clerk of the Circuit Court has marriage, divorce, probate and land records from 1777."

--------------------------------------------------------
FOR FURTHER READING
--------------------------------------------------------
-- Virginia Research Outline
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rhelps.asp
-- West Virginia Research Outline, IBID.
-- Pennsylvania Research Outline, IBID.
-- The Library of Virginia
http://www.lva.lib.va.us/
---- Though in particular, you'll most likely be viewing the Digital Resources:
http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whatwehave/index.htm
---- Also see the genealogy pages there:
http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whatwehave/gene/index.htm

One big advantage of doing online census research is that you can use both:
-- Ancestry.com (perhaps this is free through your LDS Family History Center?)
-- HeritageQuestOnline (service sold only to libraries, so I look at it through Godfrey.org)
I have found that you must look in both places for every spelling of a name to find different hit lists.
-- 1880 US Index free at
http://www.FamilySearch.org with links to free 1880 Census images at Ancestry.com

Another thing I would consider -- look at your foster care file with the state or county health department (or whoever had jurisdiction at the time.) Some type of review had to be done to determine the advisability of care to be provided by your parents and your next of kin, so their names and addresses in th elate 1960s would be listed. Let's pray they didn't purge the file.

NOW -- kiddo. Print out this letter, and check off each thing as you complete the task. When you find the census images, etc, print out copies of everything, enter them into your genealogy program, and then file the documents ASAP.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Thursday, October 06, 2005

Putting Scanned Images of Original Documents Online

From: Mark
DearMYRTLE,
Let's say that I have sent away for a copy of my great-grandfather's birth certificate (or marriage or death.) Can I scan that document and put the image on my own website? What legal issues (if any) are there? What if the document is a copy of a census page or an ancestor's journal? What guidelines exist as to what I can post? If I transcribe the contents of the document, can I post that?

DearMARK,

You won't have a problem with the vital records (birth, marriage and death) on deceased individuals as they are a matter of public record. DO NOT place any such items on your site concerning living individuals bowing to their right to privacy. I'd start with the grandparents or great-grandparents as a safe bet.

If you obtained the copy of the census page from an online service such as Ancestry.com or HeritageQuestOnline, you could have problems, because extensively you are robbing them of the opportunity for earning membership fees by others in your family who might join the service to view the same image. You could transcribe the census record for your website making sure to reference:

-- its Ancestry.com or HeritageQuestOnline location
-- its NARA microfilm number
and
-- its FHL microfilm number

If you looked at the census image on a microfilm from NARA or the FHL, then most certainly scan it into your computer and use that public record on your website. Ancestry & HQO have copyrights on their digital presentation, not on the census pages themselves.

If you have your great-grandfather's journal in your possession, then you know if you have extended his copyright following his death. Otherwise the journal is in the public domain, and you can use it on your website. I suggest scanning the image and placing thumbnail of it on the page where you have transcribed the page word-for-word. Thumbnails are smaller versions of a picture that when clicked open a larger view of the graphic. The advantage of the transcription, is that the typed text is "every word" searchable. When you've submitted your website to search engines, this fact will make it easier for people to find your site.

--------------------------------------------------------
FOR FURTHER READING
--------------------------------------------------------
-- Carrack's Guide to Copyright and Contracts: A Primer for Genealogists, Writers and Researchers, Sharon DeBartolo Carmack.
http://www.genealogical.com. 2005 ISBN#: 0806317582.

-- Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians, Elizabeth Shown Mills, editor.
http://www.genealogical.com. 2001, reprinted 2004 ISBN#: 0806316489. The publisher provides the following breakdown of topics:

Professional Preparation
1. Defining Professionalism, by Don Devine, J.D., CG, CGI
2. Educational Preparation, by Claire Mire Bettag, CGRS
3. Certification and Accreditation, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG; Paul F. Smart, AG; Jimmy B. Parker, AG; and Claire Mire Bettag, CGRS
4. The Essential Library, by Joy Reisinger, CG

Ethics and Legalities
5. Ethical Standards, by Neil D. Thompson, LL.B., Ph.D., CG, FASG
6. Executing Contracts, by Patricia Gilliam Hastings, J.D.
7. Copyright and Fair Use, by Val D. Greenwood, J.D., AG

Career Management
8. Alternative Careers, by Elizabeth Kelley Kerstens, CGRS
9. Structuring A Business, by Melinda Shackleford Kashuba, Ph.D.
10. Setting Realistic Fees, by Sandra Hargreaves Luebking
11. Marketing Strategies, by Elizabeth Kelley Kerstens, CGRS
12. Business Record Keeping, by Helen F. M. Leary, CG, CGL, FASG
13. Time Management, by Patricia Law Hatcher, CG, FASG
Professional Research Skills
14. Problem Analyses and Research Plans, by Helen F. M. Leary, CG, CGL, FASG
15. Research Procedures, by Linda Woodward Geiger, CGRS, CGL
16. Transcripts and Abstracts, by Mary McCampbell Bell, CLS, CGL
17. Evidence Analysis, by Donn Devine, J.D., CG, CGI

Writing and Compiling
18. Research Reports, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
19. Genealogy Columns, by Regina Hines Ellison, CGRS
20. Proof Arguments and Case Studies, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
21. Book and Media Reviews, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
22. Record Compilations, by Bettie Cummings Cook, CG
23. Family Histories, by Christine Rose, CG, CGL, FASG
24. Lineage Papers, by Mary McCampbell Bell, CLS, CGL and Elisabeth Whitman Schmidt, CLS
Editing and Publishing
25. Editing Periodicals, by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL, FASG
26. Proofreading and Indexing, by Birdie Monk Holsclaw
27. Preparing Books for Press, by Joan Ferris Curran, CG

Educational Services
28. Classroom Teaching, by Sandra Hargreaves Luebking
29. Lecturing, by Helen F. M. Leary, CG, CGL, FASG

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Wednesday, October 05, 2005

Cemetery Preservation Workshop in Oklahoma

From: Dittmar, Frederick M.
DearMYRTLE,
As a part of the objectives of OCPA <
http://rootsweb.com/~okcps/ocpa.htm> we have scheduled a Cemetery Preservation Workshop for the 28th and 29th of October 2005. We have contracted with the Chicora Foundation of Columbia, South Carolina to conduct this workshop. Mike Trinkley and Debi Hacker both have superb credentials and experience in cemetery restoration and preservation and have conducted these workshops all over the country. You can check them out at: http://www.chicora.org/

The contact person is: Sue Tolbert at: tolbert6@cox.net

DearFRED (not Frank!)

THANKS for your feedback, Fred. I checked out CHICORA and find from its website that "Chicora is a Columbia, South Carolina public, non-profit heritage preservation organization founded in 1993. Our work includes archaeological and historical research throughout the Southeastern United States, public education (primarily right here in South Carolina), and work in conservation and preservation with museums, libraries, archives, historic organizations, and private citizens."

They have a webpage describing cemetery preservation at:
http://www.chicora.org/cemetery_preservation.htm

I trust that other regions of the world have similar organizations. We just can't go into these cemeteries with a bottle of bleach to supposedly clean the tombstones. The long-term preservation is at stake. This organization recommends:

Association for Gravestone Studies -- they foster appreciation of the cultural significance of gravestones and burial grounds through study and preservation. <
http://www.gravestonestudies.org/index.htm>

Stone Faces and Sacred Spaces -- colleagues with an exceptional range of experience in cemetery preservation.
strangstad@aol.com

The Center for Historic Cemeteries Preservation -- promotes the study, documentation, and preservation of historical burial sites. smethompson@earthlink.net

Find the listing of "essential or fun reading" at: http://www.chicora.org/considering_a_project.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Tuesday, October 04, 2005

DearMYRTLE's Family History Hour 4 Oct 2005

DearREADERS,

This is the lineup for today's DearMYRTLE's FAMILY HISTORY HOUR, now available for you to listen to 24/7 on the web or as a podcast with your iTunes or other .mp3 player. I think you'll enjoy hearing my guests this week!

-- Geoff Rasmussen - Legacy Family Tree Version 6

-- James W. Petty, AGR, CGRSSM, B.A. (History), B.S. (Genealogy) - headright system in 17th Century Virginia

-- Grace DuMelle, author - Finding Your Chicago Ancestors

Maggie Stewart, editor of the USGenWeb Archives Newsletter provides links to Hancock County, Ohio tidbits. The MightyMouse tour explores Legacy Family Tree Version 6. Download the latest free version to follow along. Myrt discusses how to reference another researcher's work, and the definition of "grass widow" provided by bartleby.com.

Special thanks to USGenWeb Archives transcribers:
Darlene E. Kelley
Ann Anderson

The show page with links we mention during the podcast is located at:
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1004r.htm

HOW TO LISTEN
-- PREFERRED Automatic PodCast - Receive each week's file automatically as a PodCast (using iTunes, etc.) by subscribing to the podcast using the following code:
http://www.ourmedia.org/mediarss/user/33644

-- Listen-as-you-click Method #1 - OurMedia.org This link opens another webpage, with an online audio player. You may have to click the play button several times before the file will play, particularly on slow internet connections. See:
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1004r.htm

-- Listen-as-you-click Method #2 - Archives.org This link downloads the file, then opens the default .mp3 player on your computer. See: http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1004r.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

2 anti-virus programs

From: Bill Fitzgerald
DearMYRTLE,
Just read your latest column in the EVERTON'S GENEALOGICAL HELPER MAGAZINE (Sept/Oct 2005) issue. You said that you run an anti-virus program called Panda between running Norton Anti-Virus. I tried to install the Panda and it said I was running McAfee anti-virus software and that I had to uninstall it before installing Panda.

Did you have the same issue when installing Panda on your system with the Norton product on it? Do I really have to uninstall the McAfee each time I want to install the Panda program?

DearBILL,
Ol' Myrt here does a Panda ActiveScan ONLINE, by going to
http://www.pandasoftware.com
Today, the link to the free online scan is in the lower left hand corner.

It is not possible to install 2 antivirus programs on a computer without conflict as you've noted.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Monday, October 03, 2005

Getting ready for Tuesday's show

DearREADERS,
Tuesday evening (Eastern US time) is when ol' Myrt here releases each week's DearMYRTLE's FAMILY HISTORY HOUR. You will be able to listen to the .mp3 file as many times as you wish, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Why not get ready RIGHT NOW to automatically download the file whenever it becomes available?

PODCAST (AUTOMATIC METHOD)
Each pre-recorded show is available as a "PodCast" but you don't need an iPOD to listen, as any .mp3 player will do.

Ol' Myrt here currently recommends downloading and installing the free iTunes software. <
http://www.itunes.com> Then click "Advanced" and then select "subscribe to podcast" and insert http://www.ourmedia.org/mediarss/user/33644 and click the OK button. Then periodically when you open iTunes, click the "update" button in the upper right, to have it automatically look for the latest podcast from DearMYRTLE to add to the lineup on your computer. Then you will be able to listen ANYTIME without connecting to the internet! And, if you DO happen to receive an iPod for Christmas, you can specify which files to transfer the next time you link your iPod to your computer.

MANUAL (LISTEN-WHEN-YOU-CLICK METHOD)
Just go to
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com and the most recent show is featured on my home page. If you'd like to listen to previous shows, click LISTEN on the left navigation bar to go to: http://www.DearMYRTLE.com/listen.htm There you will find the show pages for each of my August and September 2005 shows.

EITHER WAY, listen whenever you wish, as many times as you wish.

REMEMBER, the "show page" provides clickable links to each guest's email addresses, in addition to the books, websites or software programs we discuss during the show.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Rosh Hashanah

DearREADERS,

Beginning at sunset tonight, October 3rd until sunset October 5th 2005, our Jewish friends will celebrate Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. It’s the beginning of the Jewish Year 5766.

"Rosh Hashanah occurs on the first and second days of Tishri. In Hebrew, Rosh Hashanah means, literally, "head of the year" or "first of the year." Rosh Hashanah is commonly known as the Jewish New Year. This name is somewhat deceptive, because there is little similarity between Rosh Hashanah, one of the holiest days of the year, and the American midnight drinking bash and daytime football game. There is, however, one important similarity between the Jewish New Year and the American one: Many Americans use the New Year as a time to plan a better life, making "resolutions." Likewise, the Jewish New Year is a time to begin introspection, looking back at the mistakes of the past year and planning the changes to make in the new year. More on this concept at Days of Awe." (1)

For those just starting out tracing their Jewish Roots, you'll undoubtedly hear about the following three websites. When anyone asks ol' Myrt how to begin, I refer them to:

--------------------------------------------------------
JEWISHGen
http://www.jewishgen.org/
They been around since 1997, to assist researchers in honoring their ancestors. Their contribution has grown by leaps and bounds. Check out
http://www.jewishgen.org/JewishGen/FactSheet.htm, which chronicles the growth through 2003. This website has a lot of "how-to" type info, in addition to several databases, and the searchable Family Tree of the Jewish People. You'll find a message board, the Jewish Records Indexing for Poland, the IAJGS Cemetery Project, and a link to an improved search capability for Ellis Island. Projects include ShtetLinks, Yizkor Book Project, Holocaust Global Registry, Online world-wide burial registry. JewishGen has joined with Yad Vashem to record the missing names of Jews who died in the Holocaust.

--------------------------------------------------------
AVOTAYNU
Publisher of works on Jewish Genealogy
http://www.avotaynu.com/
You'll want to subscribe to the print magazine of the same name, in addition to the free email "Nu? What's New?" The E-zine of Jewish Genealogy, edited by Gary Mokotoff. Of particular note is the postcard collection located at: http://www.avotaynu.com/postcards/ "Turn-of-the-century postcards and photographs of Belarus, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Ukraine, other countries of Europe and the United States available as computer scanned images (JPG). Some are scenes of Jewish life; others are views of towns and townspeople. The original postcards often cost hundreds of dollars. By scanning the originals, we can offer you images for only $2.50 apiece. You can then print the images on a color printer or include them on a Web page. The images were originally from the postcard collection of Tomasz Wisniewski of Bialystok who used the income to further his numerous non-profit projects on the history of Polish Jewry. Since then, Wisniewski has dropped out of this venture and it is provided solely by Avotaynu."

You'll also need to have copies of these award-winning publications to assist with your research:
-- Avotaynu Guide to Jewish Genealogy edited by Sallyann Amdur Sack and Gary Mokotoff
-- Where Once We Walked: Revised Edition by Gary Mokotoff and Sallyann Amdur Sack with Alexander Sharon

You'll probably find "A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from Galicia by Alexander Beider" at a regional library in the genealogy department. Avotaynu described the as a book that "provides information about some 35,000 different surnames used by Jews in Galicia. For each name, the author describes the districts within Galicia where the surname appeared, the origin of the meaning of the name (etymology), and the variants found."

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The International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies
http://www.iajgs.org/
This association holds an annual conference with representatives from over 75 national and local societies. They are planning ahead 2 years with conferences scheduled as follows:
-- 13-18 August 2006 New York City, NY
-- 15-20 July 2007 Salt Lake City, UT

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For Further Reading
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(1) Judaism 101
http://www.jewfaq.org/holiday2.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

READERS' FEEDBACK: Hearth & Home

RE: Hearth & Home http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/1001.htm

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From: Sharyn Hay meow8@verizon.net
DearMYRTLE,
I am sorry to hear of your brother-in-law's passing but glad you have had the comfort of family. About "hearth and home" I would like to say this:

Yes, there were many lonely pioneers who didn't have close neighbors at first. But the rare visits of friends and neighbors were occasions for great celebration.

When they left family behind in the 'old country' or on another coast, they did so knowing that they would never see them again and might rarely hear news of them. So, they surrounded themselves with others who could take the place of family. The church, grange, sewing circle, barn raising, quilting bee, barn dance, country fair - all were used as reasons to get together and visit while also helping one another. They created a new 'hearth and home' right where they were and drew in others to be part of their 'family circle.' Family took on a much broader meaning for them then it does for most of us.

When men went off to war in the 1800s they did so knowing they might not return, just as they do today. There was no fixed 'term of service' as there is today. They might be gone a month, a year, or several years. Often they returned in time for the harvest and then went back. Yes, it is true that news was hard to get and the families waited long months for a letter or someone to return with news. But it is also true that they did not have to watch the evening TV news or read the daily newspaper and see reports of people being killed in a place where they knew their loved one was located. Not knowing where their father, son, or brother was also meant they didn't really know details about the danger he was in.

Death was a much more familiar and common part of life for them then it is for us today. Babies died at birth or in their first year. Children fell into the fire or the creek. Farm accidents and weather accidents claimed the lives of many. When there was a death, the whole community gathered around those remaining.

Men helped with the farm chores, women helped with the food preparation and child care. Those who grieved did not do so alone. Their choices for the future were hard, just as ours are today. Widows often had to leave the farm and move in with friends or move to town. Widowers had to send children away to live with families who could care for them. Many remarried as soon as possible in order to keep the family together and love was often something that grew after the fact.

In each generation there are new things that are hard and new things that are easier. The changes that take place over time are both good and bad. But, what never changes is the need for people around us to soften the harsh realities of life and give us hope for the future.

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From: Anne Watkins awatkin3@tampabay.rr.com
DearMYRTLE,
When you mentioned "letters home during the Civil War", it reminded me of a book I just read that any genealogist might like. It's called EVER TRUE: A UNION PRIVATE & HIS WIFE by Lisa Saunders. It is the Civil War letters of Private Charles McDowell, New York Ninth Heavy Artillery. Lisa blends the letters of a young couple with the historical background of the time, and even recipes for foods mentioned, so you have a very good idea of how the war was fought and of life on the home front. I obtained my copy from Amazon.com.

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From: Bulls0729@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
You wrote: "Ol' Myrt here has been thinking about the miracle of technology and the speed of travel in this the 21st century, and how our ancestors traveling across the high seas or the western plains in the 1800s really had it rough."

I had the same thought last Thursday as I boarded an American Airlines plane bound for San Diego. We checked 2 suitcases and carried on two smaller cases with paraphernalia - books, snacks, cell phones, laptop, etc. As we quite literally whizzed across the sky at 35,000 feet, I marveled at what my great-great grandparents would have thought.

My grandfather's mother came from Missouri to Oklahoma with her sister, husband and young son in a covered wagon and I'm flying across the sky at an incredible rate of speed, going from Chicago's O'Hare airport to San Diego in just under 4 hours. Four hours. Can you imagine it!? Would they even believe it? r cell phones? Or computers? TV's? Light bulbs? I can barely believe it myself!!

I enjoyed and agree with the poem, "A Heap o'Livin'" and thank you for sharing it. My deepest sympathies to you and your family on the loss of your brother-in-law. My no-so-old cousin (early 70's) passed away from cancer early this week. My mother notified me by saying, "Perry is now walking on streets of gold." What a wonderful way to tell me he is no longer suffering. I know the loss is hard for his family but we aren't without hope! Blessings, Myrt.

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DearREADERS,
Thank-you for your thoughts and prayers. No man is an island. When I first started writing this column back some ten, now nearly 11 years ago, the "powers that be" said they thought DearMYRTLE wrote her column in a "too familiar" way, not formal enough to be credible. I think that everything we experience in life affects our writing, our research abilities, etc. We must learn and grow together. None of us start out as professional genealogists, yet in a few short months we become "experts" on the family name, and over the years we come to know the places where our ancestors once lived. Isn't it a joy to do this family history stuff?

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Sunday, October 02, 2005

Sept 2005 New Ancestry.com databases

DearREADERS,

Ol' Myrt here has been working through the redesigned Ancestry.com website this morning and stumbled across the following list of "Genealogy Databases Posted or Updated Recently." Perhaps I could cross-post the listing periodically, so my dear readers will know what's new?

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Genealogy Database Title - Date Posted
See:
www.Ancestry.com
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--Vital records of Hanson, Massachusetts to the year 1850 - 09/30/2005

-- East Saint Louis Daily Journal (East Saint Louis, Illinois) - Updated09/29/2005
-- Ashburnham, Massachusetts History - Updated 09/29/2005
-- Vital records of Heath, Massachusetts to the year 1850 09/29/2005
-- Vital records of Leominster, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849 09/28/2005
-- Vital records of Hubbardston, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849 09/27/2005
-- Vital records of Holden, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849 09/26/2005
-- U.S. Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002 - Updated 09/26/2005
-- Japanese Americans Relocated During World War II 09/26/2005
-- Social Security Death Index - Updated 09/24/2005
-- Massachusetts Marriages, 1633-1850 09/23/2005
-- Vital records of Grafton, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849 09/23/2005
-- North Carolina Birth Index, 1800-2000 - Updated 09/23/2005
-- South Dakota Death Index, 1905-1955 - Updated 09/23/2005
-- Vital records of Haverhill, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849 09/22/2005
-- Vital records of Greenfield, Massachusetts to the year 1850 09/21/2005
-- Vital records of Groton, Massachusetts, to the year 1849 09/20/2005
-- Vital records of Framingham, Massachusetts to the year 1850 09/19/2005
-- Vital records of Granville, Massachusetts to the year 1850 09/16/2005
-- Vital records of Gardner, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849 09/15/2005
-- 1920 United States Federal Census - Updated 09/15/2005
-- Vital records of Gill, Massachusetts, to the year 1850 09/14/2005
-- Vital records of Georgetown, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849 09/13/2005
-- Concord, Massachusetts : births, marriages, and deaths, 1635-1850 09/12/2005
-- Vital records of Edgartown, Massachusetts to the year 1850 09/09/2005
-- Vital records of Essex, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849 09/08/2005
-- The old records of the town of Fitchburgh, Massachusetts 09/07/2005
-- Vital records of Dover, Massachusetts to the year 1850 09/06/2005
-- Florida Passenger Lists, 1924-1948 09/02/2005
-- Vital records of Dracut, Massachusetts to the year 1850 09/02/2005
-- Vital records of Dudley, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849 09/01/2005

I just picked the ones for the month of September 2005. Looks like Dorinne might benefit from the "Vital records of Gardner, Massachusetts to the end of the year 1849."

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
6023 26th Street West PMB 352
Bradenton, FL 34207
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com