Friday, January 13, 2006

Readers' Feedback 13 Jan 2006

-- Don't use WordPerfect or Word exclusively
-- Naranzetta - Is it a carnival name?
-- Birth record created for war duty


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DON'T USE WORDPERFECT OR WORD EXCLUSIVELY
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/06/0105.htm
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From: Alice Sanders
DearMYRTLE,
Your advice to Polly was right on -- [to use a genealogy program not a word processor.] I did want to add a bit about Legacy <
http://www.legacyfamilytree.com> There is a free version and a new paid deluxe version just came out. In this new deluxe version they have a part of the program that does just what GenSmarts does. It gives you a list of where to find more information and even checks those on the internet.

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NARANZETTA - IS IT A CARNIVAL NAME?
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/06/0113.htm
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From: JIM BOGAN
DearMYRTLE,
You wrote: "SUING FOR DIVORCE AGAIN IN 1927. It's a strange document in Order Book No.105, Madison Circuit Court, January Term 1927, dated January 21, 1927, where Ethel Naranzetta is suing Jack Naranzetta again for divorce. #4540, page 289."


Could it be that the first divorce litigation was never allowed? Sometimes this happens in early suits.

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BIRTH RECORD CREATED FOR WAY DUTY
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/06/0102.htm
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From: Peg77Kel@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
You wrote: "To allow my father to enlist in the Army for World War II, a birth record was created for him."


Perhaps this is a delayed birth certificate and they added the other two siblings born after? I guess it depends on who had it created.

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From: Alice Sanders
DearMYRTLE,
Because a census record, and the information from that record, was used for the delayed birth certificate, a logical explanation for the information of the two children may not have been children born before her father, but two more children born to the mother and still living. The fields of information on the birth certificate does not coincide with the information on the census and this may have been the only place the Clerk could record all the information found on the census record.

NOTE FROM MYRT: Alice is right, though census records are not the only thing that might be used to create delayed birth certificates. Sometimes it is through the testimony of several witnesses, who may have also verbally answered that there were 2 additional siblings without regard to their actual birth dates. - Read the next entry.

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From: Jasskirv@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
We have a copy of a similar type of birth certificate made under the same type of circumstances as above for my father in law, who was born in KY in 1904, before such records were required. Since the new birth certificate was made many years after the actual birth, and by then the mother had died, friends of the family attested to the birth. It is entirely possible that someone got confused on the birth order or the actual question of how many living children the mother had had. It does not imply or even ask birth order.

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From: Christine Bauman
DearMYRTLE,
Besides the suggestions you gave in today's column, another one exists -- perhaps the information is being interpreted incorrectly, either by the reader, or by the clerk who created the birth record. My 1958 Illinois birth certificate has 2 boxes labeled "number of previous live births" and "number of previous stillbirths". No indication of whether or not those children were still alive when I was born. But that could easily be (inaccurately) restated as the "2 other living children" when the actual intent was "2 other live births." Possibly 2 other children were born to those parents, but they died very young. And they might not have been talked about by the family, so that the reader's father never knew he was NOT the oldest, officially.

In my mom's cousin's family, that very thing happened. It wasn't until the funeral luncheon of the "oldest" child, that one of her nephews casually mentioned "Earl"--an older brother who died very young. No one else knew anything about him, and it took quite a bit of digging to verify his existence. His death was so soon after birth, that a birth certificate never got filed, and his death certificate was "different" somehow complicated, of course, by misspellings, I believe.

And of course he missed the census!

We're not quite sure how this nephew found out about Earl, but he thought nothing of it, because he thought everyone already knew. Without his casual comment, though, we would never have known to even look for that baby. -- Anyway, it's another avenue for the reader to explore.

From: Sharon H
DearMYRTLE,
Was this a delayed birth certificate? If so, were two other children living at the time the certificate was created? If he had three siblings, were they all three alive in Dec. 1940? Were only two of them known to the clerk?

In some towns, personal information was included that was not in the original record. In my father's case, his original birth certificate included only his middle name. When he went to get his birth certificate, also for WWII, the clerk added his first name. She'd known him all his life and knew that he had the same first name as his father. The official record now has both his first and middle name.

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