Monday, March 27, 2006

ACROSS MY DESK: Potential Creation of a National Museum of the AmericanLatino Community

NOTE: The following just arrived from Mimi Lozano, editor of SomosPrimos at http://www.somosprimos.com

Address further inquiries to her at: MIMILOZANO@aol.com

Subject: Potential Creation of a National Museum of the AmericanLatino Community
From: MIMILOZANO@aol.com
Date: Mon, March 27, 2006 1:50 pm
Dear Somos Primos readers.

Other than Somos Primos notification, this is the first time that I have sent out a letter to readers. I do this because of the importance and potential of finally giving good historical visibility of our Hispanic/Latino heritage in Washington, DC.

Attached is information concerning a Commission to Study the Potential Creation of a National Museum of the American Latino Community Act of 2005.

It will be voted on March 30th.

It was sent by Rep. Javier Becerra, Democrat from California. Historical inclusion is a nonpartisan issue.

The creation of a National Museum of the American Latino would finally present out history where awareness is critical, in Washington, D.C.
Please contact the Representatives from your state and send this information to all your friends, organizations, co-workers, etc. Ask them all to contact their representatives. The list of co-sponsors are included.

Please act quickly. Let your Representative know that your history, our history. . . . matters.

Hopeful for positive changes . . .
Mimi

Saturday, March 25, 2006

RootsMagic, Personal Historian & FHCs

DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt just received an email from Bruce over at RootsMagic.com. He picked up on our recent discussion about placing databases on our flash drives to read at local Family History Centers or the Family History Library.

------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RootsMagic and FHCsFrom: Bruce, creator of RootsMagic
DearMYRTLE,
I didn't know if you knew this (after reading the most recent entry in your blog), but RootsMagic also offers a free unlimited license to all FHCs to install both RootsMagic and Personal Historian on their center computers. They just need to visit:
http://www.rootsmagic.com/fhc
to request their free copies for their centers.

------------------------------------------------------------
So DearREADERS, this means that the following programs can and should be available on your local Family History Center computer (in alpha order)


-- Legacy Family Tree
-- PAF Personal Ancestral File
-- Personal Historian
-- RootsMagic

Being able to check our genealogy database files facilitates our recollection of ancestral relationships. Isn't it always someone's sibling that is the famous one, not our particular progenitor?

THANKS for keeping me up to date on these offers, gang. I think this is a smart idea for the software producers. It give others a chance to demo the program, and decide if it is one to change over to. It also makes it easier for genealogy computer users groups to teach the use of each software program.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
ACROSS MY DESK: Additional research retreat in SLC

NOTE: This is just in from the EVERTON NEWSLINE March 24, 2006. Please address inquiries about the research retreats to Holly Hansen by using the email form at: http://myancestorsfound.com/about.htm

-------------------------------------
ADDITIONAL RESEARCH RETREAT & SPECIAL GUEST SCHEDULED!We’re so excited to announce that due to popular demand, another research retreat has been scheduled in June, 2006! Now you will be able to take advantage of this amazing, educational opportunity at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.

Check it out:A fantastic way to access millions of records at the FHL, get one-on-one coaching from professional researchers every day, take individualized classes, and get to know new friends in genealogy. For only $299 for a week—it’ll teach you how to conduct the best research and citations you’ve ever done, and like many of our attendees, you’ll want to come back time and again to really tackle your genealogy projects. Plus! You will take home great skills and knowledge that will serve you no matter where you search from this great week forward.

Retreat Dates:
1. April 3-8, 2006.
2. June 26- July 1, 2006. NEW!
3. November 13-18, 2006.

In addition, a special guest is coming to our Friday Evening Dinner at the historic Lion House on Temple Square. Irene Johnson, host of the Utah AM 820 genealogy program “Relatively Speaking” will be our guest. She is delightfully entertaining and knowledgeable in genealogy. You don’t want to miss it. Simply go www.myancestorsfound.com, or call the retreat hotline at 1-866-701-5071. You will be so glad you did!

Friday, March 24, 2006

Legacy database on flash drive

From: Glen Ballard
DearMYRTLE,
While listening to your podcast of 21 Mar 2006 I thought you would like to know the following:


You mentioned converting your genealogy database file to PAF (Personal Ancestral File) to take to the FHL / FHC.

To keep from converting data and wasting time:

1) I access my genealogy from my Flash drive at the Family History Center. They have Legacy 6 installed on all 6 computers. Millennia Corp gives FREE licensing to FHCs. You might want to mention to your audience that if the FHC they visit doesn't have it installed, they can request that the FHC install it. The FHC just has to contact Millennia and request the License Key for the Deluxe version.

2) I can also access my website (using TNG - The Best as you already know). I can find anyone in my database and find any facts. If I choose, I can enter the information with my Administrator's account directly in TNG (The Next Generation of Genealogy Site Building.) But I would have to make note of who I modified to add the modifications to Legacy at home. You might want to mention that patrons can access there personal websites at a FHC instead of converting the data.

Keep up the good work.

DearGLEN,
THANKS for the input. I think your first point is very well taken. The bottom line is that the PROGRAM must be installed on whatever computer you are using when you go to a research facility for your database to be read. IF your local LDS Family History Center has installed Legacy Family Tree in addition to PAF, then it will read your Legacy database directly. I wasn't aware of this offer from the Legacy folks. I will look for Legacy on the Family History Library computers next time I go.

As to your second point, accessing our genealogy databases on a webpage only requires that the research facility has access to the internet. This is a much more likely and reliable option, since virtually all facilities will have that access. Also, if that is your primary database, then updating it while at the Family History Library or other research facility would not be a problem.

But as for placing our databases on the web, even in a password-protected area, we just aren't all there YET.

Generally speaking, I'd venture to guess that 95% of the genealogists who read my column don't have their own web pages, since that is about the count when I visit an area and give a class or seminar. I DO think that eventually it will be the norm to keep ALL of our data (genealogy or otherwise) on a website where the web server is backed-up routinely. This would transcend problems when one's personal computer fails. This will also enhance communication among researchers.

But then ol' Myrt here remembers the days when email was a challenge for my readers. So as times change, we need to keep sharing information as to HOW we're managing to do effective research. I think the bottom line is that it isn't wise to go to any research facility without having full access to our genealogy databases. Whether by laptop, flash drive or web pages, we must be able to see our known ancestors in context. I wouldn't dream of printing out my pedigree chart. Last time it was over 250 pages.

NOTE: I mentioned in the podcast that I prefer to do my data entry once I am home. Part of that is a time consideration, but I've also found I am capable of better analysis when not bogged down by keeping to the train schedule for the commute back home, etc. This is particularly true when one takes a research trip to a distant county or country. Getting there and back and living out of a suitcase is fatiguing no matter how much fun it is to travel. As we know, fatigue has a negative affect on one's critical thinking skills.

For instance, when working through cryptic handwriting in a will, one might spot the connection to an heir and make the photocopy. However, when at home, a full transcription of the document can be completed without interruption. This more-detailed study might point to other valuable information. Perhaps the land is described in the distribution of the estate, and this might lead to the original deed where notations about previous generations are listed.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Tuesday, March 21, 2006

Away from Desk 22 March - 4 April then...

DearREADERS & LISTENERS,
Remember that ol' Myrt will be away the 22 March through 4 April 2006 to see her Dad and sister in Seattle. Consequently, DearMYRTLE's blog, mailing list and message board will be active, but DearMYRTLE.com won't be updated until the 5th when I return.


MYRT'S NEXT BIG SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT will be at the Utah Valley PAF Users' Group http://www.uvpafug.org/ on Saturday 8 April 2006. My topic will be "Getting from the Index to the Original" using several examples from my new book JOY OF GENEALOGY (to be released in April 2006.)

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
DearMYRTLE's FAMILY HISTORY HOUR 21 March 2006

DearREADERS & LISTENERS,
The latest edition of DearMYRTLE's FAMILY HISTORY HOUR is now available for you to listen to anytime 24/7. Myrt's topics and guests include:


-- Jay Speyerer to discuss writing techniques discussed in his new book The Stories of our Days: Writing Your True Story Using Techniques of Fiction.

-- Ideas for preserving old letters and identifying old photos

-- What to do with those very long URLS that sometimes get split in email.

-- Cuban family history research

-- A new book from Genealogical.com by Virginia Lee Hutcheson Davis titled Jamestowne Ancestors.

-- Specific links for other genealogy and family history podcasts.

THE LINK TO THE SHOW PAGE with clickable links to listen 24/7:
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/06/0321r.htm

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO AUTOMATICALLY RECEIVE DearMYRTLE's PODCASTS see:
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com/listenhow.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Saving old letters & identifying old photos

From: Patricia
DearMYRTLE,
I searched the archives on the subject, but couldn't find what I'm looking for. I have about a hundred old letters (dated 1868 - 1911) that are still in the envelopes they were mailed in. I want to preserve them but do I have to put each page in its own separate protective sleeve (letters have an average of 3 pages each)? That's a huge project - not to mention expensive! Any other suggestions?

On another note, I also have an album full of photos - probably from mid-late 1800s, with no clue as to who 98% of them are. They are marked with the photographer's name and city and sometimes dates. Is there any way to find out who these people are, i.e., a web site for posting them? Surely, there are others who are in the same situation. Thanks for any suggestions.

DearPATRICIA,
WOW! You have a marvelous collection, kiddo. I would give my eye-teeth to have even 5 ancestral letters from the 1868 time period. YES, you must put these in top loading sheet protectors, however I don't think the cost will be as high as you think. I went to the Office Depot website just now and discovered that you can purchase part of the required supplies at a fairly reasonable cost, especially considering the personal and historical value of your letters.

Ol' Myrt isn't telling you anything you don't already know. In your heart of hearts, you know you have been entrused with this ancestral treasure, and must do what you can to preserve this wonderful collection for posterity. Carefully unfold these letters, and place them in sheet protectors, since continued fold/unfolding will speed up the aging process. What if an ancestor's wife's maiden name is written right across one of those fold lines? Perhaps it is the final sentence in a paragraph simply describing day-to-day life experiences.

We don't want the paper fibers to break down and crack along the creases, effectively obliterating the handwriting.

--------------------------------------------------------
STEP ONE: TOP LOADING SHEET PROTECTORS
--------------------------------------------------------
A box of Office Depot® Top-Loading Sheet Protectors, Standard Weight, Clear, Box Of 100 is $7.89. These will fit a three-ring binder, and are acid-free and archival safe. Eventually you'll want to place these sheet-protected letters in archival boxes, because 3-ring binder storage leaves them prone to spilling out of the top of the sheet protectors. There is also the problem of exposure to light and dust.
Find these online at:
http://www.officedepot.com/ddSKU.do?level=SK&id=498811&N=4294966793&An=browse

--------------------------------------------------------
STEP TWO: ARCHIVAL BOX WITH 1" RINGS
--------------------------------------------------------
Ol' Myrt recommends the boxes described in the Light Impressions catalog. "Polypropylene Boxes are moisture and dust-resistant, made of archival polypropylene, and designed to be stackable. The Polypropylene Box features snap locks to keep your work safe, plus flexible hinges that withstand years of use. Available in black, white and gray. Holds our PhotoGuard™, TopLoaders™, SlideGuard™, Print File®, and HD PolyChron™ pages. Interior Dimensions: 10 3/16" X 1 3/4" X 11 5/8"." These run $14.95 each, and you will eventually need 5 or 6.
http://www.lightimpressionsdirect.com/servlet/OnlineShopping?DSP=50000&PCR=30000:100000:103000:103200&IID=POLYBOXRINGS

--------------------------------------------------------
WHAT TO DO WITH THOSE PHOTOS YOU CANNOT IDENTIFY
--------------------------------------------------------
There IS a website for posting old photos that you cannot identify. See the folks at:
http://www.DeadFred.com

They have successfully orchestrated 693 photo "reunions." You'll find guidelines for submissions on the right navigation bar under "Submit Photos."

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

ACROSS MY DESK: Holocaust records, 2006 Census & NYC Brides/Grooms

The following topics came across ol' Myrt's desk this morning. All inquiries should be addressed to Nu? What's New? Editor Gary Mokotoff. His email address is: info@avotaynu.com

DearREADERS,
SEVERAL important articles are discussed in the Volume 7, Number 3, March 20, 2006 edition of:
Nu? What's New?
The E-zine of Jewish Genealogy
Gary Mokotoff, Editor

-- REACTION OF GERMAN "VETO" OF PUBLIC ACCESS TO ITS DATA. "There has been much reaction to the "veto" by the German government to release of Holocaust-related records of the International Tracing Service. [ITS]

[...] "On the 16th of May, the International Commission wants to find a solution to this problem and to express a unanimous opinion, which will hopefully enable the ITS to do justice to the concerns of the former civilian persecutees of the Nazi regime as well as to the historians."

And so, DearREADERS, you'll also want to review this issue of Gary Mokotoff's e-zine to learn about three items additional items:

-- CANADIAN 2006 "OPT-IN" QUESTION
-- AUSTRALIAN 2006 "OPT-IN" QUESTION
-- STEVE MORSE'S CROSS-LINKS FOR THE BRIDE/GROOM INDEX FOR NYC

To view the full articles see: http://www.avotaynu.com/nu/v07n03.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Monday, March 20, 2006

Cuban Research

From: T.Mason
DearMYRTLE,
Since we live in Florida we are dealing with a number of people from Miami who moved from Cuba. Are you aware of some specific research aids about Cuban records other than what we have available through the Family History Library catalog?


DearTERRY,
Admittedly there are challenges when doing Cuban research, owing to political differences and the US restriction on travel to Cuba at this time. I think it is for this reason few records have been microfilmed by the Family History Library. By checking the online FHL Catalog,
www.FamilySearch.org the "topics" for Cuba include a broad spectrum of items, but not much content compared to some 80 other countries of the world. For instance, under the topic of "civil registration" we would hope to see microfilm of records back to 1885, but that is not the case. I would find this frustrating, since even the so-called "Eastern block" countries in Europe have better representation in the FHL collection.

Fortunately, ol' Myrt Googled for "Cuban family history" and stumbled across this important event occurring in 2 days in the Miami area:

The UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI'S CUBAN FAMILY HISTORY & GENEALOGY PROJECT will honor Francisco Saralegui Arrizubieta in its first Basque-Cuban ethnic program, on Wednesday, March 22 at 7 PM at Casa Bacardi, 1531 Brescia Avenue on the University of Miami campus. The event is free and open to the public. Space is limited, so reservations are recommended. To reserve space, or for more information, please call 305-284-CUBA (2822) or e-mail jrpinon47@aol.com

"Francisco Saralegui Arrizubieta was the grandfather of popular television host Cristina Saralegui, who is a UM alumna. The Cuban Family History and Genealogy Project was launched at UM’s Institute for Cuban and Cuban-American Studies (ICCAS) with the mission to undertake and support programs that document, preserve and promote Cuba’s ethnic – Spanish, African, Jewish, Chinese and others – cultural roots." For more info see:
http://www.miami.edu/UMH/CDA/UMH_Main/1,1770,2593-1;45223-3,00.html

This event is an outstanding example of living descendants taking the time to preserve their heritage by documenting the lives of their forefathers, even if it is a matter of writing down oral histories. This takes on increasing importance when we recognize the challenge of limited access to Cuban civil and church records of births, marriages and deaths -- normal record groups used by genealogists to trace their pedigrees.

I spoke by phone this morning briefly with the Cuban Family History and Genealogy Project's director, Jorge Pinon to found out more about the project. He appears personable and open. I believe this project will greatly support the Cuban family history researchers you are meeting through your local Family History Center in Miami, Terry.

--------------------------------------------------------
FOR FURTHER READING
--------------------------------------------------------
1. LATIN AMERICAN RESEARCH OUTLINE GO to:
www.FamilySearch.org; click Search, then Research Helps, then "C" then scroll down to CUBA, where you will find:
-- Cuba - Latin America Research Outline

This is where I discoved:
-- Civil Registration began in Cuba in 1885.

-- Cuba's National Library is:
Biblioteca Nacional "José Martí"
Pl. de la Revolución José Martí
Apdo. Oficial 3
La Habana
Cuba

-- Cuba's National Archives is:
Archivo Nacional de Cuba
Compostela esq. San Isidro
La Habana 1
Cuba

2. SOMOS PRIMOS - I recommend subscribing to this free e-newsletter, which is published in English, but advises how to make progress with Latino/Hispanic family history. Mimi Lozano is the editor, and she will probably have more ideas for Cuban ancestral research. See: www.somosprimpos.com

3. WORLDGenWeb's CubaGenWeb: www.cubagenweb.org/

4. CUBAN HERITAGE COLLECTION - University of Miami's Otto Richter Library is described at www.library.miami.edu/umcuban/cuban.html

A few items have been digitized: http://digital.library.miami.edu/chcdigital/chcdigital.shtml

5. CUBAN GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
http://www.rootsweb.com/~utcubangs/

6. CUBAN GENEALOGY CLUB OF MIAMI
http://www.cubangenclub.org/

7. CUBAN MAILING LISTS are best summarized at http://www.cubagenweb.org/lists.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Sunday, March 19, 2006

The road less traveled

DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt came home from yesterday's family history seminar so exhausted I went to bed without even looking at my computer keyboard. Remember, I wasn't a presenter but merely attended to learn new things. HEAVENS, did I ever learn! My head was simply spinning.. But I woke up this morning with three new articles in mind. So here we go with the first one:

--------------------------------------------------------
The class was BASIC WELSH RESEARCH taught by John Kitzmiller. Every now and then ol' Myrt here entertains the thought of attempting to make progress on my early Welsh Quakers, who were either original patentees of William Penn or those who purchased from these original settler/investors. Ol' Myrt was already aware that there is a decided lack of vowels in the Welsh language; in fact I find Welsh harder to read than Old German script.

Wales:
In English: Wales
In Welsh: Cymry

-- I learned that "BARTRUM" is the premier collection of Welsh pedigrees that I must attempt to connect with because such genealogies were required of a Welshman to carry written documentation of a good 6-9 generations of his ancestry as free persons to prove that he himself wasn't a peasant. Since my Welsh immigrants obviously had money before they came over, it is entirely possible their pedigrees are part of this collection. For instance, my Lloyd ancestors purchased 20 thousand acres from Mr. Penn. I've found extensions of these pedigrees online, but I want to prove these lineage assumptions with original documents.

-- "ap" means "son of." I learned that while "ap" was often used between the son and the father's names to denote relationship, sometimes just an "s" was added to the end of the father's name to become the son's last name. Various contractions are also identifiable. Unfortunately this means that a single individual might be known by many names, including various combinations of "ap", "s" or contractions. Studying the intricacies of this form of patronymics ol' Myrt had managed to avoid for years:

Surname: Press
In English: ap Rees
In Welsh: ap Rhys

Surname: Powell
In English: ap Howell
In Welsh: ap Hywell
Contract "ap Evan" (meaning son of Evan) to: Bevan
(Where that "B" came from, I don't know. It IS sort of like "p" if you think about it.)

-- "ferch" or "verch" means "daughter of."

Advice was given to look first to Welsh surname books, something we frown upon in English research.

I learned that often when a Welsh immigrant names his place of origin, it is the estate name, not the parish name. One must use a gazetteer to find the local parishes for evidence of birth, marriage and death in those church records.

When I left the classroom, I was so mixed up that I couldn't think straight. I took a break for lunch, but that didn't help. On the drive home, I thought back on the class and was so confused that it seemed wise to leave the Welsh side of my family tree alone for a few years until someone else does reliable research and indexes are available.

TODAY, IN THE TWILIGHT OF THE EARLY MORNING, I AWOKE TO DISCOVER IT WAS SNOWING. This reminded me of Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening." And that in turn brought to mind another favorite from his collection. From "The Road Not Taken" published in 1916, lines 18–20, by Robert Frost (1874–1963), U.S. poet:

"Two roads diverged in a wood, and I —
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference."

So by this circuitous route, I've decided to learn more about Welsh research, heaven help me. It is the more difficult road, but I think that the research experience will indeed "make all the difference."

Isn't that rather like the difference between "quick-fix online genealogists" and those who truly care to document the relationships between the generations. Obviously ol' Myrt's readers are taking the "road less traveled." The joy of discovery is worth it!

My next step is to study Bertram's, then the manorial records, many of which are on microfilm at the Family History Library. Do my readers have any suggestions?

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Saturday, March 18, 2006

LIVE radio stream tomorrow

DearREADERS,
It's not a podcast, but live local AM radio streaming over the internet to the world.
Catch it between 4-6pm US Mountain Time tomorrow.


Sunday 19th March 2006 Holly Hansen and Kim Savage from MyAncestorsFound.com will appear on KUTR 820AM's "RELATIVELY SPEAKING" show with hostess Irene Johnson.

Topic: Immigration

HERE'S HOW IT WORKS: During the broadcast catch the stream via your computer from ANYWHERE in the world.

1. Just go to: http://www.utaham820.com/

2. Click the "ON-AIR NOW - CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ONLINE" button.

3. Click listen on the next screen.

4. Adjust the volume on your computer speakers.

If you don't have free RealPlayer you will be prompted to download it so you can listen. KUTR AM820's live stream is a high quality listening, no scratchiness.

AFTER THE LIVE SHOW, catch the archived .mp3 file of the broadcast by visiting the same website, and clicking "Audio." Ol' Myrt isn't sure how long it takes for a show to appear in the archive, or how long a file will remain in the audio library.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Friday, March 17, 2006

South Davis Regional Family History Fair

DearREADERS,

Tomorrow ol' Myrt will attend the South Davis Regional Family History Fair. This time, instead of presenting, I'll be taking classes! What a wonderful opportunity to charge our genealogical batteries by learning from some of the most well-regarded names in our field of study.

Saturday, March 18, 2006
Bountiful High School
695 South Orchard Drive
Bountiful, Utah

Doors open at 7am for late registration $12.
8am - Keynote

Then choose from among 15 classes offered during each of these five sessions:
9am-10am
10:15am -11:15am
11:30am-12:30pm
12:45pm-1:45pm
2pm-3pm

Keynote Speaker: Randy J. Olsen
Randy Olsen was born in Logan Utah but, since his father was in the military, he grew up in many different areas of the United States. Randy graduated with a bachelor’s degree in German from Utah State University and completed master’s degrees in library science and public administration from BYU. He is currently working towards completing a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Utah.

Randy joined the BYU library faculty in 1972 as a German cataloguer, and has since served as Assistant University Librarian for Collection Development and Public Services, Assistant University Librarian for Budget and Administrative Services, and Deputy University Librarian. He is currently the University Librarian for the BYU Harold B. Lee Library.

Olsen is a past president of the Utah Library Association and was named its Librarian of the Year in 1996. He has also served in leadership positions with American Library Association, Research Libraries Group, Mountain Plains Library Association and Utah Academic Library Council.

For more information see:
http://familyhistoryfair.com/index.html

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
South Davis Regional Family History Fair

DearREADERS,

Tomorrow ol' Myrt will attend the South Davis Regional Family History Fair. This time, instead of presenting, I'll be taking classes! What a wonderful opportunity to charge our genealogical batteries by learning from some of the most well-regarded names in our field of study.

Saturday, March 18, 2006
Bountiful High School
695 South Orchard Drive
Bountiful, Utah

Doors open at 7am for late registration $12.
8am - Keynote

Then choose from among 15 classes offered during each of these five sessions:
9am-10am
10:15am -11:15am
11:30am-12:30pm
12:45pm-1:45pm
2pm-3pm

Keynote Speaker: Randy J. Olsen
Randy Olsen was born in Logan Utah but, since his father was in the military, he grew up in many different areas of the United States. Randy graduated with a bachelor’s degree in German from Utah State University and completed master’s degrees in library science and public administration from BYU. He is currently working towards completing a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Utah.

Randy joined the BYU library faculty in 1972 as a German cataloguer, and has since served as Assistant University Librarian for Collection Development and Public Services, Assistant University Librarian for Budget and Administrative Services, and Deputy University Librarian. He is currently the University Librarian for the BYU Harold B. Lee Library.

Olsen is a past president of the Utah Library Association and was named its Librarian of the Year in 1996. He has also served in leadership positions with American Library Association, Research Libraries Group, Mountain Plains Library Association and Utah Academic Library Council.

For more information see:
http://familyhistoryfair.com/index.html

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
FamilySearch Scanning article

DearREADERS,
You'll be interested in this article posted at the LDS Church website about the new microfilm scanning project. Where we've previously heard from David Rencher that the scanning process could be completed in as early as six years, this article discusses a ten-year conversion. Ol' Myrt has gotten spoiled by the online scanned census images and now I can't wait for this project to unfold.

--------------------------------------------------------
Unlocking the Vault: Conversion to Digital Records is Progressing
By Brittany Karford, Church Magazines

Members may not have to wonder what lies behind the 14-ton vault door at the Church's Granite Mountain Vault Records (GMVR) facility for much longer. In as little as 10 years, much of its genealogical collection may be at their fingertips.

The billions of names preserved on microfilmed records at the vault are being converted to digital images that can eventually be viewed online at FamilySearch.org and ultimately searched in and linked to an online index. The process of digitizing the microfilm is now faster than ever through a “bleeding edge” technology system called FamilySearch™ Scanning.

“I call it unlocking the vault,” says Heath Nielson, the program’s lead software engineer. “I cannot wait for the day when accessibility to these records becomes available to all.”

For the rest of the story, see:
http://www.lds.org/library/display/0,4945,40-1-3384-9,00.html

--------------------------------------------------------
Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Wednesday, March 15, 2006

ACROSS MY DESK: Non-member access to NEHGS Register Index March 20-22

NOTE: this is just in from New England Historic Genealogical Society's March 15, 2006 eNews, Vol. 8, No. 11, Whole #262 Edited by Michael J. Leclerc and Valerie Beaudrault. All inquiries should be addressed to: enews@nehgs.org

In ol' Myrt's opinion, this is unprecedented access. I suggest those with New England ancestry should take this opportunity to find out more about NEHGS.


--------------------------------------------------------
Free Non-Member Access to the Register Online March 20-22
--------------------------------------------------------
As a way to introduce potential members to the wealth of information available to members, NEHGS is pleased to offer free access to one of the thousands of databases on NewEnglandAncestors.org, The New England Historical and Genealogical Register. Normally available only to NEHGS members, the Register database will be accessible to all from Monday, March 20 through Wednesday, March 22, 2006.


Published quarterly since 1847, the Register is the flagship journal of American genealogy and the oldest journal in the field. The database includes issues from 1847 to 1994. For more information visit www.newenglandancestors.org/research/Database/register/reg_info.asp.
Non-members will be asked to provide contact information, which will not be shared, but will be used to send information about membership to visitors. Visitors will be taken automatically to the Register database after submitting their information.

PLEASE NOTE: Only the extensive Register database will be open for public use. The remainder of the databases continue to be accessible to members only.

We encourage all NEHGS members to spread the word about this offering, but to avoid disappointment, please make sure to mention that this offer is limited only to the Register. Thanks for your help in letting others know about the wealth of significant information offered by NEHGS.

Non-members can use the Register database for free March 20 to March 22.
Immigration Frustration: Malcolm Macleod 1854

From: Macleod
DearMYRTLE,
I am a novice and have been a member of Ancestry.com for a week now. I am searching my surname MACLEOD. Per an 1880 Chicago, Illinois census I know that Malcolm Macleod immigrated to the US from Scotland around 1854 (b.1849). I believe that he immigrated via Canada, and I THINK he came from the isle of Skye. The hits (from passenger lists) are so vague I don't know where to start. I know his mom was Irish and father was Scots but don't have their first names nor any names of siblings. I have attempted to find their marriage certificate and death certificates with NO luck (family members are no help either).

-- For immigration searches: Is it even possible to gather enough info to cross-check/validate a passenger list if the Malcolm that I locate is indeed my relative?

-- How limited is my search since I only have internet access? I am currently living in Germany. I don't have the first clue if I could even order these "indexes" or even if they would send any to Germany.

Any tips clues would be wonderful! Help! Thank you.

DearMACLEOD,
You are doing GREAT, kiddo! We all started out as newbies to genealogy. I am every grateful to a genealogy instructor in Maryland who set me on the right path. Your thought to look at original documents (passenger lists) rather than relying solely on a index from Ancestry.com is VERY WISE. I love the Ancestry.com indexes and scanned images, but there are other viable alternatives to consider.

Ol' Myrt just called the (FHC)Family History Center Support line, and verified that you can INDEED order in any microfilm or microfiche in the Family History Library Catalog through your local LDS Family History Center in Germany, unless of course it has a designated restricted status, limiting access to patrons of the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. To locate the address of a FHC near you, go to: http://www.FamilySearch.org This means that if the Ancestry.com database you are using was derived from a record group on microfilm at the Family History Library in Salt Lake, you can order the original document if the scanned image isn't available online.

Assuming you wish to look at a passenger list to see if the town of origin is listed, though there is perhaps a less time-consuming alternative. But since your ancestor hailed from Scotland, you are in luck! Scotland is one country that has developed a partnership with a website http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/ to provide a country-wide index to official records including:

• Statutory Registers Births 1855-1905
• Statutory Registers Marriages 1855-1930
• Statutory Registers Deaths 1855-1955
• Old Parish Registers Births & Baptisms 1553-1854
• Old Parish Registers Banns & Marriages 1553-1854
• Census Records (1861, 1871, 1891 and 1901) (view 1881 at FamilySearch.org for free)
• Wills & Testaments Free Index Search 1513-1901

This is also a fee-based website, but I think it’s a wise investment for anyone with Scottish ancestry. From this you should be able to search Isle of Skye for the name and estimated birth date, and work through the indexes at this government website. Family historians make the jump to local church records for time periods when the public vital records weren't kept. Fortunately this website understands the importance of the Old Parish registers. This would be true when searching for evidence of Malcolm MACLEOD's birth circa 1849.

FOR FURTHER READING:
These are available at:
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rhelps.asp
-- Tracing Immigrant Origins Research Outline
-- Scotland Country/City Maps Register
-- Scotland Historical Background
-- Scotland Map (Boundaries after 1974) [Description]
-- Scotland Map (Boundaries before 1974) [Description]
-- Scotland Research Outline
-- Scotland, How to Find a Map
-- Scotland, How to Find a Place Name
-- Scotland, How to Find Compiled Sources
-- Scotland, How to Find Information About the Place Where Your Ancestor Lived
-- Canada Previous Research, Part 1
-- Canada Previous Research, Part 2
-- Canada Research Outline
-- Canada, Church Records, 1600s to the Present
-- Canada, Histories of Towns, Counties, and Provinces
-- Canada, How to Find Family Histories
-- Canada, Tombstone and Sexton Records
-- Canadian 1871 National Census
-- Canadian Census Records Before 1871

There are lots of alternatives, but hopefully this info will help you on your way.
Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
ACROSS MY DESK: PLA Boston – March 22nd – 25th

NOTE: This is just in from Tom Kemp. All inquiries should be addressed to:
TKemp@NewsBank.com

--------------------------------------------------------
Genealogy Events at PLA – Boston – March 22nd – 25th
--------------------------------------------------------
Genealogy events at the Public Library Association Conference include:

-- Wednesday, 22 Mar. 7pm. Genealogy Librarians Dinner
Join with us for this traditional dinner for genealogy librarians and friends to kick off the PLA Conference. Please RSVP so that we can confirm the number attending. RSVP to Tom Kemp, TKemp@NewsBank.com or call my cell phone: 860.218.5479. All are welcome to attend.

-- Thursday. 23 Mar. 2pm Room: Hynes Convention Center – Room 302
Life Maps: Making Genealogy Come Alive for Your Patrons

-- Friday, 24 Mar. 4pm Room: Sheraton Boston Hotel – Republic Ballroom
Local History - LIVE at Your Library!

Tuesday, March 14, 2006

Family History Library installs new computers

DearREADERS,

Today after ol' Myrt flew back to Salt Lake from the Phoenix trip this past weekend, she went directly to the Family History Library for 9 hours of research. It was a little hard to miss the stacks of old computers standing on the end of the aisles on the 2nd Floor (US & Canada Film). New computers had been installed overnight. According to other researchers, there are also new computers on the main floor. Ol' Myrt hasn't checked the British Isles or International floors, as my ol' bones won't carry me that far today. Probably a consequence of this jet-setting life, eh?

Little ones look for the tooth fairy to leave a little present overnight.

Genealogists pray for faster computers -- and in this case we got them!

With only a few computers requiring "tweaking" to facilitate printing, things sure seem to be going smoothly.


Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
DAR Library completes shelving improvement

DearREADERS,

While out and about on the internet this afternoon (using one of the new computers installed overnight at the Family History Library) ol' Myrt stumbled on a this announcement from the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution's library in Washington, D. C.

"The DAR Library is excited to announce the completion of the shelving improvement project resulting in 80% more storage space in the library balconies. The shelving project is part of a greater mission to increase accessibility to books and resources in the DAR Library's collection.

Construction began in early 2006 on the library's upper balconies. Rolling bookshelves that help to increase the shelving capacity were installed on the three upper balconies. The project enabled the DAR Library to shift select materials previously located in the stacks on the main floor to the more spacious shelving in the upper balconies. In turn, the main floor has now gained more free space.

In addition, Library staff are working steadily to decrease the number of duplicate books in the collection. These steps are being made to ensure the DAR Library has space for newly published books as they become available and the collection can continue to grow at a healthy rate."

For the complete story, see:
http://dar.org/library/researcher.cfm

For those of you who felt like you might topple over the edge of those balconies, this is a welcome change.

Has anyone heard what has been done with the Huguenot Society collection? Is it still in that side room upstairs?

Happy family tree climbing!

Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Monday, March 13, 2006

Filing supporting documents

From: James Deihl,
DearMYRTLE,
I am using FTM (Family Tree Maker). Now I am starting to collect a lot of paper documentation and need a good filing system for that. I thought numbering might be a good idea, but it sounds like I should stick to my surname file for paper.

DearJAMES,
YES, stick to your surname filing system for paper. Here's why:

  • numbering each document something like 'Census 0001' etc. means nothing to the next person.

Merely transcribe the document, and copy/paste that text to notes or sources for each person mentioned in the document that is a member of your family. For instance, in your Family Tree Maker, James, the individual record of each family member listed in that census record should have a copy of the transcription and a link to the scanned image. If you only list this important info under the father as head of household, it won’t be very easy to develop a complete time-line for the children in the family, who more than likely outlived their parents. It’s a snap to remove the duplicated information from your FTM-generated word processing document before you print that family history book.

In the mean time, ol’ Myrt suggests printing a family group sheet for each family unit, then file the supporting documents and photos right after each in the notebook. I like to arrange my family group sheets from the youngest to the oldest in each section of a surname notebook. I also recommend surname notebook dividers as necessary for:

  • DIRECT (Smith) LINE
  • COLLATERAL (Smith) LINES
  • UNKNOWN (Smiths)

If you have a photo of a female as a young child, it is filed with the family group sheet where she is the child in her parent's household. If there is a photo of her as a married woman, it is filed with the family group sheet where she is with her husband and children as a family unit.

When printing out a typical family group sheet there is a reference naming each child's spouse, if the info has been entered into your Family Tree Maker (or any other genealogy program for that matter.) So where Mary SMITH is listed as a child in her father's household, there is mention of her spouse Samuel JONES. It wouldn't hurt to add a hand-written notation: “See JONES family notebook” to lead your reader to info about Mary's adult life. THAT is a logical jump, if someone were to discover your family papers before you print the book.

If documents are filed elsewhere in numerical order, that newbie won’t be as likely to correlate the family group sheet with supporting documentation. Remember how you forgot to cite your sources when you first started doing genealogy? Well, a newbie isn’t going to go looking for those documents, particularly where they have no experience with the types of documents genealogists typically unearth about their elusive ancestors.

If occasionally one must make copies of documents or photos to put in 2 places, so be it. Then each section of a notebook will be easily interpreted and very readable. We don't want to discourage those newbies by making them jump through hoops following cross-references to files for every census, probate, military, marriage, land, tax, bible, vital record, obituary, tombstone and photo relating back to the individuals on a given family group sheet.

Remember, we’re making "genealogy coffee table books" of our genealogy files that will probably extend to several 3-ring binders. Ol’ Myrt had 63 notebooks, but she gave up counting a few years back. Such clarity in filing enables the uninitiated to make sense of our compiled family histories that are not yet summarized in an official printed family history.

Communication is the name of the game.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

READER'S FEEDBACK: Coping with Destruction of Bremen Passenger Lists

From: NCBrannen@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
I always enjoy your newsletters but I read with special eager interest your article on "ACROSS MY DESK: Coping with Destruction of Bremen Passenger Lists" and how the American passenger arrival records were created. My grandfather Andrew (Andreas), then aged 14 years came over to NY the year before Ellis Island opened and started keeping records (1891?). He celebrated his 14 birthday in July aboard a ship. After arriving in NY he stayed for a short time with his sister Barbara Graf and her family in Ridgewood (I think) and then with his brother George who had a barber shop in Brooklyn or Middle Village, NY.

Grandpa slept on a cot in a storage room and earned his keep by keeping the shop clean and swept until he was able to find a paying job. One of the jobs he had was helping to build the army barracks and years later used that knowledge and skill to build a home for his wife Anna (Bauersfeld) and their family on 70th Avenue in Glendale, just across the street from the cemetery and railroad tracks. We loved that little house, built next to a warehouse and Rickter's Dental Manufacturing Company where my dad worked for 17 years.

I have often wanted to learn the name of the ship grandpa came over on and see a copy of the ships manifest but have been unable to do so. This is why I was so eager to learn that the information I was seeking, might finally be within my reach. My question to you is this:

-- Where can I find the Customs Passenger Lists for after 1871 for New York as stated in your newsletter & referenced below? It appeared the records for 1820-1897 were available, but the timeline of the four volumes ends with the year 1871. Weren't the 1872-1897 years ever completed or did I misunderstand the article?


Thanks for your help and all the interesting articles and information.

A faithful reader,
Nancy

DearNANCY,
THANK-YOU for writing! The book series described in my column is published by Genealogical.com. They're getting so close to your ancestor's range of years for arrival, but I don't think the book series will include this.

Looks like you'll want to access the CASTLE GARDEN records or the BARGE OFFICE records, which predate the opening of Ellis Island as a processing point for immigrants through New York. While http://www.CastleGarden.org may have the info you seek, I prefer to look at this (and the Ellis Island website) through http://www.stevemorse.org

Steve defines the Pre-Ellis Island arrival records into the following classifications:
1851 to 1855: pre Castle Garden
1855 to 1890: Castle Garden
1890 to 1891: Barge Office

His site can also help you understand how to order a copy of the microfilm that contains the passenger record.

FOR FURTHER READING:
“ACROSS MY DESK: Coping with Destruction of Bremen Passenger Lists”http://www.dearmyrtle.com/06/0211.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
Family Traditions

DearREADERS,
It is interesting how religion plays a role in family traditions. Over the weekend, ol’ Myrt traveled again to Phoenix, this time to attend the baptism of my grandson. In our church this is done when the child is 8 years of age. The occasion was much like I remember when one of my friends took her first communion at her church. Both events provide occasion for the joyful gathering of extended family at home after the service.


During this trip, we traveled by car through some long, often deserted stretches of the road which became increasingly difficult to navigate as the late winter snowfall increased. How thankful we were for a comfortable mode of transportation, in sharp contrast with what our pioneer ancestors experienced in settling here and there among these same mountain passes and alluvial plains.

Can you imagine taking an 800-1200 mile trip beyond civilization in a covered wagon at the unpredictable mercy of Mother Nature? Grandma Warnick and I would have huddled in the back with quilts frosted by snow that managed to leak through the flap of the wagon’s thin canvas. With the temperature at 17 degrees (according to our car’s on-board navigation system) we experienced gusts of wind that pushed our car to the edge of the road. Mere couvered wagons surely would have toppled over, pushing us to the breaking point, like the fated Donner party. Driving the horses and oxen, Grandpa would not have been able to tolerate the cold as his whiskers would become more frozen with every halting breath.

We passed two ancestral homes, one a humble single-story adobe brick with a small window on each side of the door just like five or six others huddled in the shadows of the mountains. The second home, a fancy two-story with a wide front porch was found in the next town, situated like others, one to each to block in the township. In our minds we removed all traces of modern civilization, and realized that 150 years ago, individuals in these tiny settlements must have been very interdependent during such difficult winter storms. One couldn’t just bop on down to the local Safeway or Home Depot to restock necessities to see you through ‘till after the spring thaw.

It was a little challenging for the driver of our car to pass from one place to the next in near white-out conditions. Yet our travel was a thousand times easier than negotiating the path on foot to the next farm in the hopes of retrieving an ember from the neighbor’s fire to rekindle the home fire that should have been maintained overnight.

Our ancestors got along with a dirt floor and the fire that sustained life and warmed the evening’s cornmeal mush.

We got along in a Toyota Camry with heated leather seats, a cell phone and plastic to pay for the provisions to carry us forward.

Religion may have motivated my ancestors to leave England and Germany in favor of Leiden, the American colonies or the uncharted west. But the desire to live life and maintain family traditions according to the dictates of one’s own conscience is a truth valued by all.

Ol’ Myrt is thankful she could take this journey to support her young grandson in 2006 not 1906, 1806 or 1706.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Saturday, March 04, 2006

Library manners

DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt worked through some research assignments yesterday at the Family History Library (FHL)in Salt Lake City. Once when walking down the aisle between rows of microfilm cabinets, I came across a tiny little lady who asked for my assistance. She simply couldn't reach to place a film on the top shelf of a vertical overhead drawer and there was no library step-stool in sight.


Upon closer inspection, her name tag revealed that this dear woman was a volunteer staff "missionary." She was about 4 feet nine inches tall and cute as a button, gray hair and all. She held a small wooden box with microfilms yet to be filed.

I was curious, thinking perhaps these were new copies of worn-out microfilm, or new films being added to the collection.

Ol' Myrt was shocked when this dear lady calmly told me it was her hour to refile microfilms left out by patrons of this floor of FHL. [aaack!] During her first 15 minutes on this regular job rotation, she had worked through about 30 microfilms left out on this floor of the FHL, the US/Canada microfilm collection.

Where is Miss Manners when we need her?

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Friday, March 03, 2006

Numbering systems: FTM and LFT

From: GWINNALICE@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
Regarding numbering systems that are done automatically, I was so disappointed in Family Tree Maker (FTM) 6 because there is no such system that I could find. (I had had years of successful work with Brother's Keeper which automatically assigned a person's number, in addition to the Ahnentafel number that you described.)

The main reason I like the automatic numbering system for people (not events like marriages, deaths) is that I could differentiate by their numbers between two or more people of the same name. It made it faster when I wanted a certain man and had to merely type in his number to pull him up on the screen. That way, I rarely had problems with adding wife or children to the wrong man. -- Just another way to judge a genealogy program.

DearGWINALICE,
Thanks for explaining
how the lack of a RIN (as in Record ID Number in PAF Personal Ancestral File) in FTM impacts your data entry.

With regards to Legacy Family Tree (LFT) our friend Geoff Rasmussen recently posted "
Understanding Genealogy Numbering Systems, A question about genealogy numbering systems was recently posted to the online Legacy User Group: What is the difference between Register & Modified Register Reports?

When printing a descendant book from Legacy, there are two possible formats - Modified Register, and Register. These options are found on the Descendant Book Report Options screen."
For more info see the full article:
http://legacynews.typepad.com/legacy_news/2005/12/understanding_g.html

Please note that Legacy's descendant charts also have different numbering systems from which to choose:

Generation numbers
Henry numbers
d'Aboville numbers
de Villiers numbers

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Thursday, March 02, 2006

READER'S FEEDBACK: Numbering Systems

From: Virginia
DearMYRTLE,
In reading this last e-mail about a genealogy numbering system, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints has a program called PAF 5.2 that numbers each individual person as you enter them into the program. The program can be purchased under $10.00 at the Salt Lake Distribution Center, 1999 West 1700 South, Salt Lake City, Utah 84102. 801-240-3800. [It’s a free download from
http://www.FamilySearch.org ] -- Hope this helps.

DearVIRGINIA,

THANK-YOU FOR your response! I am glad you wrote, because I think ol' Myrt here forgot to differentiate between the type of numbers assigned during data entry with genealogy programs such as PAF and the numbering system my previous reader was requesting. Remember that computers think a little differently, and prefer to remember people as numbers. Programs such as PAF assign the next available number automatically as you mentioned. Actually I think they all do, but PAF makes this record number visible if you so set the option. This is known as a person's RIN (record id number) and is assigned in the order you type individuals into the program. However, this number is not a decipherable code indicating relationships.

The numbering system the my previous reader was looking into would be one where a parent might have a number, and the child would have that number as a prefix, and his/her own unique number 1, 2, 3 etc. as an indication of his/her birth order as that parent's child. It would then be possible to trace direct ancestors in a book by removing the last digit(s) to indicate the father to find in that book, then repeating this to find grandfather, etc.

Another numbering system is found in the Ahnentafel chart, where your parents are multiples of your number on the chart. If you are number 1, then your father is number 2, your mother number 3, your paternal grandfather number 4 (a multiple of your father's number). Notice the women are odd numbers? This is an almost universally understood numbering system. When I traveled to Germany on my research trip 11 years ago, I took an ahnentafel chart and found I was able to communicate more readily with that chart than with my extremely limited German. 'Course it didn't help me order Sauerbraten in Düsseldorf.

The Richard Pence articles <
http://www.saintclair.org/numbers/> explain the numbering systems required if you wish to submit your genealogy for publication in the NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY or the NEW ENGLAND HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL REGISTER, two well-regarded family history periodicals with exacting specifications for documentation and submissions. Pence also provides descriptions and examples of other numbering systems that are less familiar to ol' Myrt.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Wednesday, March 01, 2006

Single Numbering System

From: James Diehl
DearMYRTLE,
Is there a single numbering system that will allow me to number ancestors, my descendants, descendants of ancestors, and their husbands, wives, etc? If so where do I find it?

DearJAMES,
There is no single accepted numbering system per se. The genealogy programs out there will generally allow you to assign your own unique numbering system. These genealogy programs also provide for printing books and reports, using various numbering systems.


Richard Pence wrote a series of informative articles about numbering with examples of each type. You'll find these posted online at Mike St. Clair's website. See:

Pence, Richard. NUMBERING SYSTEMS IN GENEALOGY
http://www.saintclair.org/numbers

Richards 1995 summary of genealogical numbering systems includes:

ANCESTOR NUMBERING SYSTEM
-- Sosa-Stradonitz System or Ahnentafel

DESCENDANT NUMBERING SYSTEMS
-- The Register System (system used by the New England Historical and Genealogical Register)

-- The Record System or Modified Register System (system used by the National Genealogical Society Quarterly)

-- The Henry System

-- The D'Aboville System

-- Modified Henry Systems

-- The de Villiers/Pama System

-- Other Variations

-- Combined Numbering Systems

Ol' Myrt's suggestion is not to worry about a specific numbering system. Just enter the names and pertinent information with source documentation in your main-stream genealogy software program. At the point where you'll need prepare your genealogy for publication, the software does all the thinking for you when it comes to numbering, depending on the type of report you specify.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com