Saturday, July 29, 2006

Ancestry's loss is our PDF gain

DearREADERS,

Ol' Myrt was shocked to find that Ancestry.com is discontinuing one of its
Magazines,GENEALOGICAL COMPUTING, just as computers have become an essential component in genealogical research. Fortunately GC's former editor is going out on her own. See the following posting:


-----Original Message-----
From: Elizabeth Kelley Kerstens, CG, CGL liz@ancestordetective.com
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2006 1:18 PM
To: Clooz-L@rootsweb.com
Subject: Digital Genealogist

Many of you know that I have been the editor of Ancestry's
Genealogical Computing for the past nearly seven years. Ancestry has
chosen to discontinue the magazine, effective with the
July/August/September 2006 issue that is currently in the mail. I
still believe there's a need for a magazine devoted to genealogy and
technology. To that end, I am starting my own magazine later this
year. It will be called Digital Genealogist and will be delivered to
subscribers as a PDF. It will be similar in format and content to
Genealogical Computing. In fact, a lot of the authors and columnists
will continue to write for me in the new publication, including Drew
Smith, popular Cybrarian columnist. The first issue of Digital
Genealogist will be send out via PDF attachment to subscribers in
November 2006.

If you are interested in subscribing, the annual rate is $20. You can
subscribe at www.digitalgenealogist.com. Payments are being taken
through PayPal by clicking on the PayPal button on the Digital
Genealogist website. Subscriptions will begin with the first issue.

One of the advantages to subscribers of a PDF is that the URLs in
both articles and ads will be live links, allowing you to immediately
explore ideas suggested by authors and websites of advertisers. I am
hoping that the format will be agreeable to subscribers.

Liz Kelley Kerstens, CG, CGL
Editor, Digital Genealogist


-------------------------------------
So, DearREADERS, it seems we need a score-card to keep up with the changes
in the genealogical magazine publishing world. My best to Liz with this
project!

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
227 Bellevue Way NE #544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
ACROSS MY DESK: SMGF Updates online DNA database

From the Sorensen Molecular Genealogy Foundation's JULY 2006 WEBSITE UPDATE:

"We are pleased to announce the release of the Sorenson mtDatabase available at http://www.smgf.org. As its name suggests, this is a correlated database of mtDNA sequences and genealogical data. The 4000+ samples that comprise this first release have been sequenced along the entire control (D-loop) region. For this reason, the database can be queried using data from HVR1, HVR2, and HVR3.

Furthermore, we have enhanced the current Y chromosome database searching capabilities by adding nearly 700 new haplotypes, the DYS464 marker to the already impressive list of searchable markers, a new version of the place/time analysis application, and new educational pages to help you learn more about molecular genealogy and find new family connections.
We invite you to try the newly released Sorenson mtDatabase and added features available on the SMGF website. As always, please contact us at info@smgf.org with your comments and suggestions.

Sincerely,
The SMGF Team"

So, DearREADERS, if you'd like to learn more about Y chromosome databases and the definition of haplotypes, get in touch with the Sorensen Molecular Genealogy Foundation via its website:
http://www.smgf.org

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
227 Bellevue Way NE #544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Friday, July 28, 2006

ACROSS MY DESK: Essential Pope books MA, ME & NH on CD

DearREADERS,

From the Archive CD Books USA Newsletter, 27 July 2006, Issue 2006, Number 8 we read:

Charles Henry Pope, THE PIONEERS OF MASSACHUSETTS, (1900) 2006
"Pope has entries for more than five thousand persons found in the records of Plymouth Colony and Massachusetts Bay Colony between 1620 and 1650. The author follows each resident of these colonies until death, utilizing many sources not employed by Savage and others who had covered the same period.

Pope squeezes into his entries information from ship passenger lists, lists of freemen, church records, town records, deeds and wills. Of especial importance, the author included data from the Massachusetts Archives papers, from the Middlesex County Court Files and from the notarial records of Thomas Lechford and William Aspinwall, sources not mined by previous compilers of similar compendia.

This source provides a comprehensive survey of the early decades of two New England colonies, and must be consulted by all researchers working in this time and place."

Other old book titles now transferred to fully-searchable CDs released this month at Archives CD Books include:

-- Charles Henry Pope, THE PIONEERS OF MAINE AND NEW HAMPSHIRE, (1908) 2006

-- Rev. Martin Lovering, HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF HOLLAND, MASSACHUSETTS, (1915) 2006

-- Walter Eliot Thwing, HISTORY OF THE FIRST CHURCH IN ROXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS,

-- SCHEDULE OF THE TITLE DEEDS OF THE SNEATON ESTATE (NORTH RIDING)

-- BASSETT'S BOOK OF ANTRIM 1888

-- THE SLIGO CHRONICLE: ALMANAC AND DIRECTORY FOR 1878

-- FARRAR'S INDEX TO IRISH MARRIAGES 1771-1812

-- GUY'S DIRECTORY OF MUNSTER 1893

Look for these and other titles at: http://www.archivecdbooksusa.com
There is free shipping on orders over $50.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
227 Bellevue Way NE #544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Saturday, July 22, 2006

Access points for US Federal Census records online

DearREADERS,
When Ol' Myrt recommends searching the scanned images of US Federal Census records online, I think of three places:


ANCESTRY.COM (fee-based to individuals, free to FHCs) To locate a FHC (Family History Center) near you, see: http://www.FamilySearch.org

HERITAGEQUESTONLINE.COM (fee-based, sold to libraries, not individuals) To locate a library near you see the growing list at http://eogen.com/HeritageQuestOnline

Yes, there is the free USGenWeb CENSUS PROJECT, but it isn't complete. See if your ancestors' localities are online by visiting http://www.UsGenWeb.com

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Friday, July 21, 2006

NOTE FROM MYRT: My previous column titled "KEEPERS" was missing the bibliographic citation to the article about Lebanese migration. Please note the amended column below. Myrt :)

DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
--------------------------------------------------------
Keepers


DearREADERS,
As we think about the push-pull factors encouraging our ancestors to migrate, we think about religious freedom, devastating wars, failed crops, political strife, or perhaps lack of land for the younger generations.

Sometimes we forget the toll it takes on a family to have separation between parents and children, husband and wife, or the younger generation and the family elders who were too infirm to withstand the rigors of travel.

My Google alert for the word "ancestry" brought the following article to my attention. Here's a first-hand witness, describing how difficult it is to have family scattered across the globe, even in the 21st century.

--------------------------------------------------------
From the Fairfax Digital
By CAROL NADER
July 22, 2006
(from page 2)
"The Lebanese arrived in Australia in three waves. The first two, between 1880 and the 1920s and then between 1947 and 1975, mainly involved Christians searching for new opportunities. But Batrouney says people in the third wave, which arrived after the civil war intensified in 1976, did not necessarily want to leave their country. Some considered Australia as a temporary home and returned when the war was over, bolstering traffic between the nations." [...]

"Just imagine your mother or sister or brother, and you don't know whether they're dead or alive … you don't know whether they're trying to escape the war zone or if they're able to," says Camilleri. "It's almost worse to be 10,000 miles away than it is to be on the spot."

SEE: http://www.theage.com.au/news/in-depth/out-of-conflict-a-new-sense-of-identity-is-born/2006/07/21/1153166583323.html

--------------------------------------------------------
So, my DearREADERS, doing family history is more than gathering names and dates, its understanding and appreciating the daily struggles faced by our ancestors. Think of the woman alone on the prairie having her second child, without her mother to attend? Perhaps that grandmother stayed in the old country because financial circumstances did not allow the move.

Wouldn't a letter from a distant loved one mean the world to each woman?

The genealogy you are compiling will one day be precious to a distant descendant, curious to know from whence he came. Family historians are the keepers of the ties that bind. Keep up the good work.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
Keepers

DearREADERS,
As we think about the push-pull factors encouraging our ancestors to migrate, we think about religious freedom, devastating wars, failed crops, political strife, or perhaps lack of land for the younger generations.

Sometimes we forget the toll it takes on a family to have separation between parents and children, husband and wife, or the younger generation and the family elders who were too infirm to withstand the rigors of travel.

My Google alert for the word "ancestry" brought the following article to my attention. Here's a first-hand witness, describing how difficult it is to have family scattered across the globe, even in the 21st century.

--------------------------------------------------------
From the Fairfax Digital
By CAROL NADER
July 22, 2006
(from page 2)
"The Lebanese arrived in Australia in three waves. The first two, between 1880 and the 1920s and then between 1947 and 1975, mainly involved Christians searching for new opportunities. But Batrouney says people in the third wave, which arrived after the civil war intensified in 1976, did not necessarily want to leave their country. Some considered Australia as a temporary home and returned when the war was over, bolstering traffic between the nations." [...]


"Just imagine your mother or sister or brother, and you don't know whether they're dead or alive … you don't know whether they're trying to escape the war zone or if they're able to," says Camilleri. "It's almost worse to be 10,000 miles away than it is to be on the spot."

See: http://www.theage.com.au/news/in-depth/out-of-conflict-a-new-sense-of-identity-is-born/2006/07/21/1153166583323.html

--------------------------------------------------------
So, my DearREADERS, doing family history is more than gathering names and dates, its understanding and appreciating the daily struggles faced by our ancestors. Think of the woman alone on the prairie having her second child, without her mother to attend? Perhaps that grandmother stayed in the old country because financial circumstances did not allow the move.

Wouldn't a letter from that distant loved one mean the world to each woman?

The genealogy you are compiling will one day be precious to a distant descendant, curious to know from whence he came. Family historians are the keepers of the ties that bind. Keep up the good work.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
Cavalier manners

From: GWINNALICE@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,

A good way to remember which way is the right way to spell the military units where soldiers rode horses:

-- The CAVALIERS were early military units in Virginia. Therefore, they belonged to a Cavalry unit.

-- CALVARY is the hill where Jesus was crucified.

Please, if you plan to publish anything about such a unit, spell it CAVALRY.

DearALICE,
The mistaken use of one word in place of another gets past "spell check" doesn't it? Since computers don't know everything YET, we must take care not to spell in a cavalier manner.

--------------------------------------------------------
cav·a·lier

n.
-- A gallant or chivalrous man, especially one serving as escort to a woman of high social position; a gentleman.
-- A mounted soldier; a knight.
-- Cavalier A supporter of Charles I of England in his struggles against Parliament. Also called Royalist.

adj.
-- Showing arrogant or offhand disregard; dismissive: a cavalier attitude toward the suffering of others.
-- Carefree and nonchalant; jaunty.
-- Cavalier Of or relating to a group of 17th-century English poets associated with the court of Charles I.

[French, horseman, from Old Italian cavaliere, from Late Latin caballrius, from Latin caballus, horse.]

cava·lierly adv.
--------------------------------------------------------

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Thursday, July 20, 2006

Cemetery follow-up: The MYSTERY Shopper
By guest author: Terry Grumbles, Sr. tngru@yahoo.com

Did you know, in Sunset Valley, Texas there is a cemetery located just north of Home Depot on Brodie Lane? You can find it now. Last August (2005), Amy with the Works Dept, City of Sunset Valley and I were talking about a photo that I had taken for an article that "Ol' Myrt" myrt@dearmyrtle.com was writing.

The opening photo in that article http://www.dearmyrtle.com/05/0921.htm was clouded by a white, foggy spot. It partly blocked out my grandson Michael who was trimming trees. I told Amy it looked like a ghost hovering over the grave of my cousin, Eliza Jane Grumbles.

Amy said that she had heard some ghost stories from the employees at Home Depot, so I went over there and checked it out.

Gregg W., who has been there for years, told me he was closing the garden section one night, putting stuff back in the store when he saw "Fred."

Everyone there calls him Fred.

Gregg saw someone walk around the corner behind a tall rack, towards the store entrance. He walked over there to see if he could help him. That "mystery shopper" was gone.

Kapoof. Gone.

Gregg also told me that one of the police officers of Sunset Valley pulled in the parking lot one night and saw a person walking across the parking lot. The officer shined his spot-light on him.

Kapoof. He was gone. Faded to nothing.

That officer stopped and radioed for help; for someone to come get the officer. He was all shook-up.

If you come to visit the Grumbles Ranch Cemetery, please be careful that you don’t run over a "mystery shopper" going to Home Depot, or its old location, where Academy is now. That just might be a Grumbles cousin of mine roaming around.

Wednesday, July 19, 2006

9 years of research: Birth record dilemma

From: Joy Erickson
DearMYRTLE,
I was chatting with Jody at the Family History Center this morning and she said that you were moving to Washington to take care of your parents. We will miss having you in the area but no one understands better than I the needs of aging parents. Was happy to hear that your daughter has recovered from her terrible accident.

Jody suggested that I send you an email about a question I have been dealing with. Hope you will be patient as this may take longer than is normally appropriate.

The sticky situation involves naming and date differences with one of my ancestors. Need your experienced look at this to help me make the right decision. In the interim, I will continue to look further for more resources.

I have been having a 9-year discussion with a Weller cousin who is a published genealogist. He has been very helpful and we have mutually contributed a great deal of family information. Our ongoing discussion, first of all, has to do with my 5th great grandmother, Ann's maiden name. Spellings below from transcribed records.

--------------------------------------------------------
BACKGROUND
--------------------------------------------------------
Ann STOTT'S marriage record was found in 1794, the Goshen Presbyterian Church in Goshen, Montgomery Co, NY where she married Andrew WELLER. There were 4 other STOTT women in the same record who were married within the previous 10 years who could be her sisters. Andrew WELLER was of German [Palatine] heritage and attended the Montgomery Brick Dutch Reformed Church near where they lived after marriage. Records there were kept in a mixture of German and English during that time. Her name in the German birth records for their children were transcribed as STOTT, STATT, SLOAT, SLOT and even HUNT. I have not been able to access the original records to look more closely at the spellings.

My Weller genealogist felt that her surname was probably SLOAT because there were two families by that name in the German records but upon closer inspection neither family profile worked. Nor did info from SLOT/SLOAT family histories on the internet. Could not find an Alexander or Ann of the right ages or area. Searched Revolutionary War, census, (local histories), all church records available in the area. Agreed, some church records had burned so the task seemed hopeless.

One helpful clue was found in Ann & Andrew's children's names. Their first born was named John Wilkin WELLER after Andrew's step-father who raised him. Son 2 named Phillip after Andrew's birth father who died when he was 2 years old. 3rd son named Alexander Statt WELLER. (The "a" could easily have been an "o" in the original.) By custom, this child would [could] have been named after Ann's father.

Just this week, I found an Alexander STOTT and wife Mary Wilson who had at least 3 daughters christened in the First and Second Presbyterian Church of NYC in the 1760s and 70s. NYC is about 30 miles southeast of Goshen & Montgomery, NY. The three on the NYC Presbyterian record for children of Alexander and Mary Wilson STOTT are the same as 3 of the women who were married in Goshen: Ann, Mary & Judah. When available I hope to find the others there. Do you feel that this evidence will be enough to establish the family connection even though there is another hitch?

--------------------------------------------------------
THE HITCH
--------------------------------------------------------
That hitch has to do with Ann's birth record in NYC which is different from the one inscribed on her tombstone in Hamilton County, OH where she was buried. NYC Presbyterian record says born 25 Oct 1771, christened 15 Dec 1771. Her tombstone says "Born 5 Oct 1772."
I know this is not an unusual problem. Normally the church record would be considered the official one but is that so in this case?

Sorry this took so long. Hard to condense 9 years of search into just a few words.

DearJOY,
You've done a marvelous job attempting to summarize the info you've collected. This summary should appear in notes for your ancestor, so that those who follow will know EXACTLY which original documents (usually on microfilm) you've searched. I particularly like where you mentioned that you only looked at transcriptions of the church record, and not at the original marriage entry for Ann and her husband. Transcription errors do occur, and this can throw indexes way off, particularly where the beginning letter of a name such as "S" is mistaken for a "B" or an "F". If so, you can easily miss the entries for an ancestor that could be 50-100 pages earlier in a large index book.
YES, I believe you are on the right track, but you need a little more work. The coincidence of Alexander Stott is just too strong to ignore.
--------------------------------------------------------
CONSIDER FIRST
--------------------------------------------------------
-- SPELLING OF NAMES was not standardized in the US until the 1930s with the Social Security Administration's influence. So the variable of an "a" instead of an "o" doesn't bother me a bit. You could list Ann's name as STOTT, if (when you view it) her original marriage record lists it in that manner. Be sure to discuss the alternative spellings in NOTES in your genealogy management program for Ann.


-- TOMBSTONES are least accurate about birth dates, when compared to death dates which is the most recent info.

-- 30 MILES was a great distance in the 1760s and 1770s, but it is not inconceivable that a woman (and her 2 sisters) would move with her husband (and their spouses) to the hinterlands where land may be cheaper. That is the story of westward movement in the US.

-- Ann and Mary are fairly common names, so I would not consider them as definite sisters on just that info. However, Judah is a little more unusual. The fact that Ann named one son Alexander is most intriguing.

-- NAMING PATTERNS are not etched in stone either. It could be that Alexander was named after a favorite uncle, and that the women's names were repeated among families of cousins. That happens today, doesn't it?

--------------------------------------------------------
WHAT TO DO NEXT
--------------------------------------------------------
-- MONTGOMERY COUNTY, NEW YORK was created 1772 (as Tryon; renamed 1784) from Albany. You may have to look at Albany County records as well. See the FHLC Family History Library Catalog for available microfilm/fiche records.
http://www.FamilySearch.org.

-- GOSHEN is cataloged in Orange County, New York in the aforementioned FHLC. I found books, fiche and microfilm in these categories which might be useful to your research:
New York, Orange, Goshen - Archives and libraries - Inventories, registers, catalogs
New York, Orange, Goshen - Centennial celebrations, etc.
New York, Orange, Goshen - Church history
New York, Orange, Goshen - Church records
New York, Orange, Goshen - Directories
New York, Orange, Goshen - Newspapers
New York, Orange, Goshen - Vital records

-- CENSUS Run a surname-only search of Ancestry.com's index to the 1790 census (yes, much later) to see how many STOTT/SLOT/SLOAT etc. families exist in each area. Follow the likely ones as far forward as possible. Often we just look for our own family, and ignore others by similar names in the area. Sometimes it is in THEIR land and probate records that we find clues to OUR side of the family.

-- LAND RECORDS in the known area of Montgomery, Albany and Orange counties NY should be searched for clues about others living there by the same name. Consider doing the same for NYC if you don't find your answers upstate.

-- TAX RECORDS ditto

-- PROBATE RECORDS should be searched in Montgomery, Albany and Orange counties NY and NYC areas for STATT/STOTT/SLOT/SLOAT etc. If there is a NYC will or distribution of estate mentioning your ancestor Ann and 2 sisters in Goshen, then you've got a definitive answer to your query.

Ol' Myrt feels that in the last three years, more old records with better indexes have come into view for your research. Please also read the following research outlines from http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rhelps.asp
-- New York Research Outline
-- United States Research Outline
-- US Military Research Outline

The online versions of these helpful guidelines are better than the easily out-dated printed versions we loved in the 1990s. There is even an online guide titled: Name Variations in United States Indexes and Records IBID.

--------------------------------------------------------
SUMMARY
--------------------------------------------------------
Joy, you already know to base your lineage assumptions on more than one document. And whatever you do, continue to summarize your findings and place them in NOTES for the ancestor in question. This explains your reasoning process and leaves an audit trail for those that follow.


Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Monday, July 17, 2006

READERS' FEEDBACK: Occupation: Japoner/Japonner

DearREADERS,
WOW, within just a few hours, you've added so much to the understanding of this occupation listed in a 1910 US Federal Census enumeration. The original article on this topic is found at:http://www.dearmyrtle.com/06/0716.htm

--------------------------------------------------------
From: April Hoover (an Electrician's daughter)
DearMYRTLE,
Japaning is a process used to protect metal. The metal is dipped in lacquer or varnish and baked on (cured) in a japaning furnace. This results in a thick glossy finish. You might recall this type of finish on old sewing machines and scissor handles. As far as your reader's ancestor in the electrical works, the cast iron cases of the electrical motors being produced were probably Japaned to prevent them from rusting and that what the guy did for his daily bread.

--------------------------------------------------------
From: IKPharo@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
"Japanning" was a term for a high gloss, multi-layered furniture finish, if I recall my Art History correctly.

--------------------------------------------------------
From: FamRSearch@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
I had assumed it dealt with a person who created lacquered objects. They some times have stuff on the antique road show that they call Japanware that is lacquered with a number of layers of varnish. Here is info from a site that gives a history of Japanware (in English or Welsh!!). Website: http://www.japanware.org/history.asp

"The term 'Japanware' is used to describe objects which have been finished and decorated in a particular way. A ‘Japan’ finish can be created on lots of different materials. 'Japanning' means the finished, decorative surface and not the article itself.

In the 6th century the Chinese developed a way of applying different coloured varnishes onto items of furniture. Part of the process involved baking the items so that the layers of varnish or lacquer became much harder than ordinary painted surfaces. This lacquering process often involved decorating the object with designs. [...]"

Julia Coldren-Walker
PS I was the Rev War expert on the Ancestry chat room many moons ago.

NOTE FROM MYRT: THANKS, Julia, I do remember you! :)

--------------------------------------------------------
From: Karen Stuart
DearMYRTLE,
Because the person worked at an electrical works, it may refer to some technique of varnishing used for insulation. I'm more familiar with the term as it relates to decorative arts: a technique of varnishing that was applied to furniture, boxes, screens, etc., imitative of goods produced in Japan. Very popular, and often very beautiful. Search "japanned" at http://images.google.com for some pictures.

From the Yahoo encyclopedia; http://education.yahoo.com/reference/encyclopedia/entry/japannin

From Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lacquerware#Japanninghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Art_of_Japanning
--------------------------------------------------------

From: Mac1
DearMYRTLE,
The definition you have as #1 is probably the correct one. In the past lacquer was used as an insulation in electrical motors and other devices. The coils of the motor, for instance, was dipped in a vat of lacquer, dried, and then touched up by hand. When the lacquer dried hard, it kept the windings from moving and wearing from the magnetic forces.

--------------------------------------------------------
From: HOWARD HICKMAN
DearMYRTLE,
A Japaner is probably someone who applied Japan Black. It is a black varnish that was used as an insulator on small diameter wire for electrical purposes. Electronics do-it-yourselfers in the 1940s and earlier used "enameled" wire. Some of it was coated with a black enamel.

--------------------------------------------------------
From: Margmcdo
DearMYRTLE,
I believe it is a painting process that gives an oriental look to a cabinet. I have a cabinet [61" high x 42" wide] that has had the process done. It seemed to have been popular in the 1920s.

--------------------------------------------------------

From: Marlena Amalfitano
DearMYRTLE,
Japanned items were usually black metal, either with a high gloss to resemble Japanese lacquer work or with a dull finish and embellishments something like tole ware. Early sewing machines had a Japanned finish, with glossy back and gold scrolling.

--------------------------------------------------------
From Lavonna,
DearMYRTLE,I went to Cyndi'slist.com in the Old Occupation's section. Japanner: Applied Japanese style black hard varnish. "Japanning".

--------------------------------------------------------
From: IMOJC1@mcleodusa.net
DearMYRTLE,
I believe the occupation of Japaner/Japanner derived from the insulating varnish that was put on electrical wires used in manufacturing electric motors, windings, magnetic coils etc. Thanks for all your hard work and sharing of knowledge of genealogy. I save every newsletter and then when I have a large amount I save them to CD for future reference.

--------------------------------------------------------
Dear, DearREADERS, I especially love it when you share the source for your thinking, i.e. your dad's experience as an electrician, an art history class, a cabinet you own, Cyndi's list, a wiki, etc. That helps others understand how you arrived at your conclusions. That is just the sort of audit trail we need when attempting to understand unusual terms. The same is true for documenting the source of the lineage assumptions we make when climbing our family trees.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Sunday, July 16, 2006

Occupation: Japaner/Japanner

From: Sgdilsworth@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
I found a new, unknown (to me) occupation for a cousin in the 1910 census. He was a "Japaner" at an electrical works. Have you ever heard of this, or perhaps one of your readers have come across it. I "googled" it, but came up with no results. This was in the Chicago area.

DearSHIRLEY,
Well, Ol' Myrt has never heard of this term either. At first I wondered if the interpretation of the enumerator's handwriting was part of the problem. However, I went to dictionary.com and came up with this alternate spelling, which might shed some light on the subject:

Japanner
\Ja*pan"ner\, n.

1. One who varnishes in the manner of the Japanese, or one skilled in the art.

2. A bootblack. [R.]

So, DearREADERS, does anyone else have experience with this term "Japaner or Japanner" ? Let us know ASAP.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Wednesday, July 12, 2006

Everton subscription & e-newsletter

From: Barbara Garrett
barbg419@msn.comD
earMYRTLE,
I wrote you about three weeks ago concerning some CDs that were available through Heritage Quest before its untimely passing. I received your response
http://www.dearmyrtle.com/06/0623.htm within a couple of days, so I am going
to try another question.


Actually, I sat down and sent in my subscription to get the Everton's package, partly to compensate for the loss of Heritage Quest and partly because I had subscribed to Everton's Family History Magazine in 2003, and then believe I only received 2 issues before it faded away. I have heard nothing about the subscription although I thought I might get something at my email address, and then thought about my over-zealous program that tosses any address it doesn't recognize into my junk file. I don't check it very often, so I was wondering if I might have received a message regarding the online subscription and missed it.

Also, what in the world has happened to EVERTONS NEWSLINE with the genealogy information they provided and the wonderful articles by Frank Beacon and the answers to the queries that were so interesting. It has disappeared from my emails. Was I dropped or was it dropped? Barbara Garrett.

DearBARBARA,
EVERTON'S NEWSLINE (a weekly genealogy email) was produced in most recent years by the then editor of Everton's GENEALOGICAL HELPER, Holly Hansen of MyAncestorsFound.com.

The column by "Frank Beacon" was written by various ghost writers, and was a name developed for this purpose back in the days when Lee Everton owned Everton Publishing. It is my understanding that Everton's does not plan to do research for people nor answer research queries.

Fortunately, Holly Hansen and her crew continue to do research and answer queries through their web site, blog and monthly newsletter. They also provide guided research retreats at the Family History Library in Salt Lake. You may also be interested in their immensely popular regional family history fairs. See: http://www.myancestorsfound.com.

As for what to expect with the Everton's GENEALOGICAL HELPER, contact them directly through Everton.com. Their land line is 800-443-6325, and they are located at 570 Research Pkwy # 106, Logan, Utah. I notice Everton's website has been down today and yesterday.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
227 Bellevue Way NE #544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Tuesday, July 11, 2006

PERIOD COSTUMES - Pennsylvania Germans

-----Original Message-----
From: David Weiser
To: WEISER-L@rootsweb.com
Subject: [WEISER-L] A little off topic
A friend of mine recently pointed me to a Renn fair type of show for colonial America called Penn's Colony (
http://www.pennscolony.com/). It looks like a lot of fun, set in the French and Indian War period. The only thing is, from the website it looks like only the English, Scottish, French, and Native Americans are represented. This makes me sad, and I would love to go dressed in period and show some German spirit. So for you historians out there, what was the garb of that period like? Was there anything particular to our German ancestors? I'd hate to go and end up being a total misfit.

DearDAVID,
Ol' Myrt loves the idea of going in period costume. Of course, there are many websites, even our own WEISER FAMILY HOME PAGE -
http://www.rootsweb.com/~pajcwfa/index.htm that show examples of clothing of the time period. Why not go as Conrad Weiser himself? His "dress clothing" as the first magistrate in Reading, PA might be appropriate.

For additional ideas, remember, he served as a Colonel during the French & Indian War time period in PA. You can get lost looking through the various sites associated with the PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL & MUSEUM COMMISSION http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/ Publications through your local public library (perhaps in the children's department) may provide illustrations of clothing styles.

See also:
PENNSYLVANIA GERMAN SOCIETY
http://www.pgs.org/

HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA
http://www.hsp.org/

PENNSYLVANIA HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
http://www.pa-history.org

WIKI - French & Indian War
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_and_Indian_War

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com