Wednesday, May 16, 2007

Powerful databases coming online

The Web is becoming a great place to view original documents that might prove ancestral relationships

DearREADERS,

There was much ado about Ancestry.com's decision to pull out of free access through local LDS Family History Centers equipped with high speed internet effective 1 April 2007. Until late last week, those of us with personal Ancestry.com accounts could not sign in to our accounts using computers at the Family History Library or Family History Centers. That access to subscribers has been "fixed" but free access to Ancestry.com’s Library edition through Family History Centers is a thing of the past.

In the mean time, the following report of additional databases to be made available comes from a Tim Steinberger by way of his posting to the FHCNET group as follows:

"The information came from FHCSupport through the center’s LDSMail accounts this afternoon about new databases to be available to Family History Centers soon. The information was sent to FHC Directors, and the procedures for accessing these databases will be sent to the Directors when they become available. The databases to become available are:
· World Vital Records (worldvitalrecords.com)
· Kindred Konnections (kindredkonnections.com)
· Godfrey Memorial Library (godfrey.org)
· Heritage Quest Online "

Tim Steinberger, Director
Brookings Oregon Family History Center
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FHCNET/message/15560

Ol' Myrt has had the privilege of speaking "off the record" with a few higher ups in the world of genealogy and there are additional wonderful announcements to come down the pike.

Before posting a blog, I routinely check my email. Good thing I did, because I noticed this important announcement just posted in a special edition of Nu? What's New? The E-zine of Jewish Genealogy. Editor Gary Mokotoff reports:



Access to Arolsen Records to Be Expedited
“Representatives of the 11 countries that comprise the committee that governs the International Tracing Service in Bad Arolsen, Germany, met Tuesday and decided to start distributing electronic copies of the ITS records, rather than wait for the remaining four countries—Luxembourg, Greece, Italy and France—to give their formal approval. It probably will not significantly expedite public access to the records, but it does show that the mood of the committee is not to allow formalities to inhibit public access; instead time is of the essence.

Meanwhile, the Holocaust survivor movement in the U.S. is chastising the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Movement for not making “immediate remote access” to the Arolsen records once they have them in hand. They are accusing Paul Shapiro, director of the museum's Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, of being the villain. Ironic since Shapiro was probably the person most instrumental in getting the Arolsen records released from the clutches of ITS.” Nu? What's New? Volume 8, Number109, May 15, 2007. Back issues available at: http://www.avotaynu.com/nu.htm
And some people think that ancestral research is pretty much a dead topic, huh? Exciting new developments are happening all the time.

Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
www.DearMYRTLE.com

(c) 2007 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

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