Wednesday, February 28, 2007

ACROSS MY DESK: National Archives, West Virginia University Announce New Partnership

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: This following was just received from the National Archives. All inquiries should be addressed to Public.Affairs@nara.gov.

From: Public Affairs Public.Affairs@nara.gov
Sent: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 7:10 AM
To: Public Affairs
Subject: National Archives, West Virginia University Announce NewPartnership
February 28, 2007

National Archives, West Virginia University Announce New Partnership to Promote Research, Public Awareness of Electronic Records

Washington, DC. . . The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and West Virginia University (WVU) announced today the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding to establish a 10-year research and educational partnership in the study of electronic records and the promotion of civic awareness of the use of electronic records as educational resources.
The new partnership complements NARA's establishment of the Electronic Records Archives Program operations at the U.S. Navy's Allegany Ballistics Laboratory in Rocket Center, WV, near Keyser in Mineral County.


"I'm delighted that the National Archives has joined with West Virginia University to support our critical mission," said Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein. "This partnership is an excellent investment in education to develop future generations of archivists. It will also enhance public awareness of the significance of records documenting the democratic process."

"I welcome the partnership between West Virginia University and the National Archives. This joint effort will help to ensure the preservation of America's history and heritage," U.S. Senator Robert C.Byrd, D-WV, said. "Without an understanding of history, we, as a nation, will not have a solid foundation for the future. The preservation of key documents and historical items will provide an important resource for generations to come."

Under the agreement, NARA and WVU will engage in collaborative research and associated educational activities. These include research in the preservation and long-term access to complex electronic records and engineering design documentation. The agreement also states that NARA will provide test collections of its electronic records as resources for scholarship, education, and learning in educational programs throughout West Virginia.

Another focus of the partnership is the investigation of applications of advanced technologies including the first installation of the Department of Defense's Defense Research & Engineering Network (DREN) in the state of West Virginia.

"It is exciting for West Virginia University to have the opportunity to contribute to the important mission of the National Archives through our research and educational programs," said John D. Weete, WVU's vice president for research and economic development. "It is a privilege for WVU to be in this partnership with the National Archives and associated with a program of such national importance."

About NARA
The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) ensures, for the citizen, the President, the Congress, and the Courts, access to records that document the rights of citizens, the actions of Federal officials, and the national experience. NARA plays a key role in fostering effective and responsible government through management of the records in all three branches of the Federal Government and through sustained access to historically valuable records in the National Archives and the Presidential Libraries. For more information, please visit the National Archives and Records Administration web site at
www.archives.gov.

About West Virginia University
Located in Morgantown, WV, WVU is a public, land-grant institution and a Carnegie Foundation "Research University," engaged in research programs, science, engineering, health sciences, arts and humanities, and the social sciences. With over 28,000 students in 15 colleges and schools, WVU offers 178 academic programs from which to choose and countless undergraduate and graduate research opportunities. For more information, visit
www.wvu.edu

# # #
For press information, please contact the National Archives Public Affairs Staff at (202) 357-5300, or West Virginia University Director of News and Information Services, Becky Lofstead, at (304) 293-3990.


Tuesday, February 27, 2007

Locality brick walls

DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt has received lots of feedback about finding a place that doesn't seem to exist anymore including Geoff Rasmussen's response to a seminar attendee. He determined
"In 1712, Woodstock was in a completely different county AND a completely different state."

Is Geoff just really smart?
(well, yes he is!)
~ or ~
Does his use of Goldbug's ANIMAP merit notice?
(well, yes it does!)


Find out how he guided a researcher around her "Woodstock" brick wall:
http://legacynews.typepad.com/legacy_news/2007/02/why_you_might_h.html

Ol' Myrt notes that Geoff is one of our friends from LegacyFamilyTree.com. He is a gifted instructor. If you get the chance to attend one of his classes at an upcoming seminar -- do it! I particularly like his Legacy Family Tree training video titled "Insider's Guide to Legacy: Tips & Tricks." Don't get me wrong -- Legacy Family Tree IS a delightfully intuitive genealogy management program. Geoff explains some of his favorite little known options which helped me take advantage of the full potential of the software. When you visit his blog, referenced above, you'll see the link for the training CDs.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------
Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Monday, February 26, 2007

5-Minute Guide to Jewish genealogy research, etc.

DearREADERS,
A newbie posed questions about pre-holocaust Jewish ancestry, and I managed to delete the email before creating this response. (You know how it is, you watch yourself in SLOW MOTION do the very thing you don't really want to be doing on your computer.) May I recommend the following resources:

1. Anything written by Gary Mokotoff including but not limited to the 5-MINUTE GUIDE TO JEWISH GENEALOGY RESEARCH.
"Two major events shaped Jewish life of the past two hundred years: migration and the Holocaust. Few Jews today live where their ancestors lived a century or two ago. As a result many Jews believe they cannot trace their family roots because:
-- My family name was changed (at Ellis Island)
-- No one in my family knows about the past
-- No one is left alive to tell me about my family's past
-- All the records were destroyed in the Holocaust
-- My town was wiped off the face of the map
These statements are myths. Jewish genealogy today is highly organized and therefore help is available to dispel these myths. There are many resources available to help you trace your Jewish family heritage."
For more info see:
http://www.avotaynu.com/jewish_genealogy.htm

2. THE FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY'S JEWISH RESEARCH OUTLINE
"This outline introduces records and strategies that can help you learn more about your Jewish ancestors. It teaches terminology and describes the content, use, and availability of major genealogical records." For more info see:
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rg.asp?Dest=G1&Aid=&Gid=&Lid=&Sid=&Did=&Juris1=&Event=&Year=&Gloss=&Sub=&Tab=&Entry=&Guide=JewishGenealogy.ASP

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------
Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
BEST OF THE INTERNET FOR GENEALOGISTS: Belcher, American Indians, GA, KY & TX

From: Nanapudn
DearMYRTLE,
This is one of the newsletters I subscribe to for my Belcher family of Henry County, Georgia. They do a marvelous job and have so many great articles with links to American Indian resources. Two of my DAR members go into the Ramey line and found missing dates, one found an Indian ancestor she thinks. I loved reading the Pocahontas article as I have been preparing a Pocahontas presentation for Colonial Dames. One poor woman in our chapter has been asking for someone to talk about Pocahontas. Since that woman just celebrated her 91st birthday, I thought I could do a small one for her.

---------------------------------------------------------
The February issue of the Belcher Blues is online
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~genbel/feb07/index.html
---------------------------------------------------------
You can also access it through belcherblues.com. Included in this newsletter:
-- American Indian Research Links
-- Hugh Belcher
-- Pension Application for Mary Belcher Widow of John
-- Abraham Belcher
-- Elkhorn City and Belcher Kentucky
-- Belchers in Wood County Texas
-- Frank Belcher
-- John T. Belcher
-- John Belcher son of George and Sally Taylor
-- Old Bailey in England

DearBARB,
Thanks for sharing. I checked out the site. It was friendly & informative. I loved the caveat: "We want to remind you that this is a research website and newsletter and many genealogies are sent in by fellow researchers. Please, do your own research into your line and take these postings as a guide." How Ol' Myrt wishes that everyone would follow that advice. It is MORE fun to do research than to merely copy what someone else has attempted to prove.


BIG CONGRATS to BELCHER BLUES editors Gayl Wells and Greg Belcher for a job well done!

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------
Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Sunday, February 25, 2007

Windows software on a Macintosh

DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt here has begun working with a newbie to genealogy, who purchased a brand new Macintosh desktop computer, so that she can use her familiar Mac programs, and then add the component of using Windows versions of genealogy software programs. I spent time earlier this week on the phone with Bruce Buzbee to find out how his RootsMagic works on Mac computers.
We both agreed, we would LOVE to hear from Dick Eastman about his MacBook

Well, today's posting from Dick details how he uses:
-- Parallel
-- Windows (Vista or XP)
-- Family Atlas (a Windows platform genealogy mapping program)
http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2007/02/family_atlas_fo.html

Mac computer owners will want to familiarize themselves with the possibility of having 2 spaces open on their computer screens:
-- one with a MAC program open
-- one with Windows program capabilities

This is particularly important if Mac owners are using Reunions by LeisterPro. It is my understanding that the LeisterPro developers are not attending the meetings with FamilySearch to ensure full compatibility with the "new" FamilySearch database/website that has yet to be released.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------
Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Saturday, February 24, 2007

READERS' FEEDBACK: 24 Feb 2007

-- RE: England & Wales Internet Access to B, M & D
-- RE: Finding help for software (FTM)
-- RE: Cost of doing research
-- RE: Father's past: Uncovering another family
-- RE: What about paper vs. online newsletters

---------------------------------------------------------
Re: England & Wales: Internet Access to Birth, Marriage & Death
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2007/02/england-wales-internet-access-to-birth.html
---------------------------------------------------------
From: dmmon.messageboards@ntlworld.com
DearMYRTLE,
The announcement, which I read about earlier this week when visiting the Family Record Centre, is interesting. However it should be noted that the indexes are currently available inline at
www.genesreconnected.co.uk . I hope the new arrangement is an improvement on the current method. At the moment, even if the name & year are known the search result cannot identify what quarter the result is in. Let us hope the new system will at least combine the quarters.

NOTE FROM MYRT: You will also find access to indexes through:

-- FreeBMD http://freebmd.rootsweb.com though the work is far from complete.

-- For a fee: Ol' Myrt used "1837 online" which changed its name this fall: http://www.findmypast.com . I located ancestors in the quarterlies, made note of the record book codes, and then sent (via internet ordering) for copies which arrived via snail mail from England to Florida within 14 days. Amazing.

---------------------------------------------------------
Re: Finding Help with Genealogy Software
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2007/01/finding-help-with-genealogy-software.html
---------------------------------------------------------
From: E.Rodier
DearMYRTLE
The main FTM (Family Tree Maker) discussion list started in 1995 and has long time customer participants who do not subscribe to the RootsWeb mailing lists about FTM. --
http://www.genealogy.com/help/ftm_curr.html

---------------------------------------------------------
RE: Cost of Doing Research
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2007/01/cost-of-doing-research-from-name.html
---------------------------------------------------------
From: sallysloan@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
I loved your response! Thank-you Myrt for your reply to Cost of Doing Research! Maybe I have become judgmental in my old age but I truly believe there are more people who believe the world owes them whatever their little hearts desire.

People who have a hobby need to consider the amount they can comfortable spend on that source of entertainment. It is not the duty of a government agency or the owner of a web site to provide for all their recreational wishes. Genealogy is the same as any other hobby; you can only do it to the degree your finances allow. If your aim is to satisfy a religious need then your religious leaders will, no doubt, be your best resource and can be supplemented by your local library. If the writer were a golfer would they expect someone else to provide the clubs and pay the greens fees?

I enjoy your columns.

-----
From: RMcfa45544@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
Well I don't agree with you. I have been at this for 50 years now. I started with just my name and took it back to 900 bc in some cases. I am not rich in money but am is skill of finding my ancestors. Oh yeah, I have my share of dead ends there is one couple I have had until quite recent. In my 51st year I found the wife's record in Vermont. And her family's records are all over the place:

-- in the index that was made during the make work for people during the depression [WPA]

-- in private collections

-- in the town clerks office

I have found several marriage records under dog licenses! And then under their last names. Shoot I would suggest you learn how to do research. I agree with you on the cost of Certs going up, and local clerks robbing folks blind thinking no one will ever know. Well, two town clerks have lost their jobs because of me. Thank you. (And my money overage returned.)

-----
From: Naomah
DearMYRTLE
I live in Georgia and Ancestry.com is available free at any library in the state. Heritage Quest is too and it is even available at home through the library with a password they will give you. Ancestry has to be used in the library though. -- Maybe this will help some folks.

---------------------------------------------------------
RE: Father's past: Uncovering another family
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2007/01/fathers-past-uncovering-another-family.html
---------------------------------------------------------
From: juanita
DearMYRTLE,
There's another suggestion I might make in this research regarding Richard Louis Janning's first marriage. I wonder if the researcher has looked at his father and mother's marriage record. If the marriage was a 2nd one for him, the marriage application would probably indicate that. I found Iowa records for an ancestor regarding a marriage in the 1880's and the marriage application gave not only the bride's maiden name, name of parents, but also the name of her first husband. The affidavit said it was a 2nd marriage. That would/should clarify whether or not Richard Louis Janning was married to a Shirley.

-----
From: Elizabeth Powell Crowe
DearMYRTLE,
Do you think it would help him to look at wills? Perhaps his dad mentioned them, or perhaps a will was recorded for HER, and never probated?


---------------------------------------------------------
RE: What about paper vs. online newsletters
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2006/12/what-about-paper-vs.html
---------------------------------------------------------
From: Tracy St Claire
DearMYRTLE,
One of the reasons cited by this gentleman was people forwarding his newsletter without paying for it.


When I started Bible Records Online, I was going to make it a $$$ site. And then I was going to try to scramble the images so that people couldn't "steal" my content and put it on their sites or in their newsletters.

I have had a complete change of heart. My new worry is that the site will crash without a copy anywhere -- that this information will die without anyone having access to it. Steal away -- many copies reduces the chance that images, information or anything dies forever.

Genealogists forever protecting their personal discoveries risk those ancestors being lost forever. And this gentleman should get off his high horse -- if it is good enough to forward, it will be good enough to buy. $30-$40 for a newsletter would have to be PLENTY good.

---------------------------------------------------------
As always, thanks for sharing your thoughts, DearREADERS.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)

DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------
Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy: "another "
How additions to GenealogyBank are reported


Click to find out more about GenealogyBank.com



DearREADERS,
On the 23rd of February, Ol' Myrt here had an interesting email conversation with Thomas Jay Kemp, our friend at GenealogyBank.com. He had forwarded the summary of "NEW CONTENT ADDED - FEB 2007" listed below.

Ol' Myrt thanked Tom politely, and said I'd be happy to report the new content if he would let me know at the actual END of the month. (Made sense at the time.)

Then Tom explained the cycle of reporting, and how things work at GenealogyBank. He said no new content is added on the last day of a month, and that his report was compiled on or near the last Friday of each month. Any new content added between the time he created this February report and the end of the month, would appear on his report for March 2007.

OK, makes sense to me. It takes time to compile reports. AND if you really want to know what's new, just visit: GenealogyBank.com and look for the NEW CONTENT ADDED DAILY list, with a link to "much more". WONDERFUL!!!

---------------------------------------------------------
New content added to GenealogyBank in February 2007
---------------------------------------------------------
Summary Totals
-- Historical Newspapers (1690-1977) Over 1,300 titles; 78.4 Million articles – updated monthly
-- America’s Obituaries (1977-Current) 23.3 Million Obituaries; 800 newspapers – updated daily
-- Historical Books (1801-1900) More than 11,600 items – updated monthly
-- Historical Documents (1759 – 1980) Over 112,000 items; Now digitizing June 1907 – updated monthly
-- SSDI (1930 to Current) 79 Million death records. Only site to be updated weekly
-- New newspaper content added in February 2007:

Title
City
State
Dates of Coverage

Birmingham News
Birmingham
AL
4/27/1993 to Current
America's Obituaries

Decatur Daily
Decatur
AL
8/1/2006 to Current
America's Obituaries

Daily Confederation
Montgomery
AL
5/1/1858 to 11/30/1859
Historical Newspapers

Arizona Sun
Flagstaff
AZ
1/9/2007 to Current
America's Obituaries

California Courier
Glendale
CA
2/15/2007 to Current
America's Obituaries

San Francisco Bulletin
San Francisco
CA
11/12/1867 to 12/31/1890
Historical Newspapers

San Jose Mercury News
San Jose
CA
7/1/1914 to 6/30/1922
Historical Newspapers

Amity Observer
Bethany
CT
12/6/2006 to Current
America's Obituaries

Easton Courier
Easton
CT
12/1/2006 to Current
America's Obituaries

Hamden Journal
Hamden
CT
12/7/2006 to Current
America's Obituaries

Huntington Herald
Huntington
CT
12/6/2006 to Current
America's Obituaries

Milford Mirror
Milford
CT
11/30/2006 to Current
America's Obituaries

Mystic River Press
Mystic
CT
1/11/2007 to Current
America's Obituaries

Valley Gazette
Shelton
CT
12/6/2006 to Current
America's Obituaries

Stratford Star
Stratford
CT
12/6/2006 to Current
America's Obituaries

Trumbull Times
Trumbull
CT
12/6/2006 to Current
America's Obituaries

Columbus Daily Enquirer
Columbus
GA
5/26/1899 to 12/31/1900
Historical Newspapers

Columbus Daily Enquirer
Columbus
GA
2/24/1904 to 11/8/1908
Historical Newspapers

Columbus Ledger-Enquirer
Columbus
GA
1/1/1903 to 10/26/1910
Historical Newspapers

Macon Weekly Telegraph
Macon
GA
7/5/1885 to 9/30/1885
Historical Newspapers

Macon Weekly Telegraph
Macon
GA
1/1/1912 to 8/12/1922
Historical Newspapers

Belleville News Democrat
Belleville
IL
1/1/1916 to 12/31/1917
Historical Newspapers

Inter Ocean
Chicago
IL
8/23/1878 to 5/1/1893
Historical Newspapers

Pomeroy's Democrat
Chicago
IL
8/3/1870 to 7/31/1875
Historical Newspapers

Lexington Herald
Lexington
KY
2/1/1914 to 2/28/1918
Historical Newspapers

Sun
Baltimore
MD
6/6/1851 to 5/15/1900
Historical Newspapers

Duluth News-Tribune
Duluth
MN
10/1/1898 to 12/31/1898
Historical Newspapers

Duluth News-Tribune
Duluth
MN
1/1/1901 to 12/31/1904
Historical Newspapers

Minneapolis Journal
Minneapolis
MN
5/1/1895 to 12/31/1900
Historical Newspapers

Kansas City Star
Kansas City
MO
5/1/1890 to 10/31/1899
Historical Newspapers

Kansas City Star
Kansas City
MO
1/21/1905 to 4/14/1912
Historical Newspapers

Helena Independent
Helena
MT
1/1/1899 to 12/31/1900
Historical Newspapers

Bismarck Tribune
Bismarck
ND
7/1/1885 to 12/31/1900
Historical Newspapers

Grand Forks Herald
Grand Forks
ND
4/9/1915 to 4/19/1922
Historical Newspapers

Omaha World Herald
Omaha
NE
1/1/1890 to 10/31/1906
Historical Newspapers

Philadelphia Inquirer
Philadelphia
PA
7/1/1887 to 2/28/1889
Historical Newspapers

Philadelphia Inquirer
Philadelphia
PA
11/1/1911 to 8/31/1922
Historical Newspapers

Wilkes-Barre Times
Wilkes-Barre
PA
4/17/1909 to 9/7/1914
Historical Newspapers

Southern Patriot
Charleston
SC
4/1/1842 to 9/30/1842
Historical Newspapers

State
Columbia
SC
7/1/1910 to 9/30/1910
Historical Newspapers

Aberdeen American
Aberdeen
SD
3/1/1907 to 10/16/1912
Historical Newspapers

Aberdeen Daily News
Aberdeen
SD
8/18/1896 to 9/30/1897
Historical Newspapers

Aberdeen Daily News
Aberdeen
SD
6/2/1908 to 4/17/1911
Historical Newspapers

Ft Worth Star-Telegram
Fort Worth
TX
5/3/1907 to 4/25/1918
Historical Newspapers

Bellingham Herald
Bellingham
WA
1/1/1913 to 4/29/1916
Historical Newspapers

THANKS for the official update, Tom! Keep up the GREAT work.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------
Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

Friday, February 23, 2007

WHY we have message boards

DearREADERS,
As Ol' Myrt was posting to her message board, she ran across this query from a reader named


JACKGLO1:
"Received a family research history with references to "Adair County, Illinois". I can't locate this county. Is it possible that the state is wrong or a county that only existed a short while in IL ? The time frame is about 1830-1840. I've done a lot of research, but this has me stumped--don't know where to look for info like this. Thanks"

-----
Seven days later, JUDYVANDUSEN99 replied:
"Could the county be St. Clair County? At one time it was one of the largest counties in Illinois and many other counties were formed from it."

-----
Today, another research added to the discussion. BOOKRATT replied:
"Not sure if this helps, but Adair County, OKLAHOMA, on the ILLINOIS RIVER is found often at Google. Might they have meant Adair County in Oklahoma, Illinois River area? It is in the Illinois River Basin area of Oklahoma.

There is also Adair County, MISSOURI, a state which borders Illinois and though the county is well inside the state border today, might it not have been, early on? The MO area was opened to settlement in 1812, prior to your time period.

Most of the Adair counties I know of were named for Kentucky Governor John Adair. But the Oklahoma one was apparently named for the Cherokee Indian Adair family. Don't know if that somehow connects to your search."

-----
NOW AT THIS POINT, WE HAVEN'T ACTUALLY SETTLED THE COUNTY LOCATION PROBLEM, but the discussion sure has expanded, because two people have already responded to the original query.

THIS IS WHY WE HAVE GENEALOGY MESSAGE BOARDS -- to facilitate exchange of information among genealogy researchers.

Ol' Myrt chose to look in THE HANDYBOOK FOR GENEALOGISTS (11th edition, copyright 2006 Everton Publishing, edited by Holly Hansen.) Beginning on page 854 is the "County Index" listing all occurrences (past and present) of the name. Here we find listed:
-- Adair County, Iowa
-- Adair County, Kentucky
-- Adair County, Missouri
-- Adair County, Oklahoma

There are active genealogy message boards at Yahoo.com and RootsWeb.com (the latter takes you to the parent company, Ancestry.com). Look for them by:
-- surname
-- locality (including each of the Adair counties listed above)
-- genealogy software
-- genealogy newsletters
-- historical societies
-- special interest groups

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)


DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------
Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
Ancestry.com Breaks Barriers in Black Family History Research
With Launch of Largest Online Collection of African-American Historical Records

NOTE FROM DearMYRTLE: This just in from PRNewswire. All inquiries should be addressed to the folks at Ancestry.com

---------------------------------------------------------
Newly Expanded Collection Traces Back to Thousands of African-Americans
Living Before the Civil War


PROVO, Utah, Feb. 21 /PRNewswire/ -- In celebration of Black History Month, Ancestry.com, the world's largest online resource for family history, today announced the launch of the largest collection of African-American family history records available and searchable online. The collection, which represents the 19th and early 20th centuries, features more than 55 million black family history records that collectively dispel the common misconception that very few historical records were kept for African-Americans and that tracing African-American ancestry is virtually impossible.

"The power and depth of this collection speaks directly to the misperceptions of black family research, offering hope that transcends time and inspires every generation," said Tim Sullivan, President and CEO of The Generations Network, parent company of Ancestry.com. "One of our youngest customers, 15-year-old Jari Honora from New Orleans, has traced his Creole family tree to 1801, and many others are finding that tracing their family trees is possible."

Ancestry.com's newly expanded African-American Historical Records Collection contains U.S. Colored Troops service records of those who served in the Civil War and Freedmen's Bureau records as well as a myriad of other African-American specific resources such as photos, slave narratives from 3,500 former slaves, and the soon-to-be-added Southern Claims Commission records.

The collection also includes 53 million African-American records in the complete U.S. Federal Census Collection (1790 - 1930), which is now searchable with a new, special filter that identifies African-American entries, regardless of their description in the census such as "colored," "Negro," "black," "mulatto" or other variations. The 1870 census is a major milestone in black family history as the first census enumeration to list formerly enslaved African-Americans by name.

A cross-section of the collection also reveals several black icons such as Rosa Parks, Langston Hughes and Louis Armstrong, as well as the ancestral legacies of James Earl Jones and Denzel Washington. Other celebrity highlights include --

* Jada Pinkett-Smith: Actress Jada Pinkett-Smith, wife of actor Will
Smith, descends from a line of African-Americans free before the Civil
War. Her great-great-grandfather Daniel Pinkett was just a young boy
when he was recorded in the 1860 census. At that time, free blacks
were the only African-Americans noted in the census. After the Civil
War, in 1870, the 13-year-old could not read or write and had not
attended school during the previous year. Ten years later in 1880, not
only could 23-year-old Daniel read and write, he was a school teacher.

* Maya Angelou: According to the 1930 census, the poet's 18-year-old
mother, Vivian Johnson, was a widow with two young children --
two-year-old Maya (who is listed by her birth name, Marguerite Johnson)
and three-year-old son Bailey. The young family is living in
St. Louis, Mo., with Vivian's parents; Vivian's mother's name is
Marguerite.

* Frederick Douglass: In January 1871, the famed abolitionist's
Freedman's Savings Bank account at the Washington, D.C. branch,
received a $1,500 deposit. Douglass' bank record was signed by his son
Lewis, suggesting that Douglass was not present at the time of the
deposit. Douglass served as President of the Freedman's Savings Bank
during Post-Civil War Reconstruction.

* Duke Ellington: A 19-year-old Duke Ellington listed his occupation as
messenger for the U.S. government on the World War I draft registration
card he filled out in 1918. His place of employment was Chief of
Staff, War Department, Washington, D.C.

"Thirty years ago, Alex Haley's Roots ignited fervor for black family history that swept the entire nation, and yet tracing African-American ancestry remains a challenging adventure," said Tony Burroughs, African-American family historian and author of "Black Roots: A Beginners Guide to Tracing the African American Family Tree" (Simon & Schuster, 2001).

"Ancestry.com's expansive collection is a major breakthrough that opens the gateway for African-Americans everywhere to dig deeper into the lives of their ancestors via the Internet. Though black family history still presents a unique set of challenges, this collection is major stepping stone that makes African-American genealogy resources more accessible and illuminates the legacies of past generations for us to celebrate today."

This month, individuals can search the African-American Historical Records Collection and receive free access to Ancestry.com for three days. To explore the African-American Historical Records Collection, visit http://www.ancestry.com/aahistory.

About Ancestry.com
With more than 5 billion names and 23,000 searchable databases and titles, Ancestry.com is the No. 1 online source for family history information. Since its launch almost a decade ago, Ancestry.com has been the premier resource for family history, simplifying genealogical research for millions of people by providing them with many easy-to-use tools and resources to build their own unique family trees. Ancestry.com received more than 4 million unique site visitors and 295 million page views inNovember 2006 ((C) comScore Media Metrix, Worldwide, November 2006).

SOURCE Ancestry.com
NGS PRESS RELEASE: US Archivist Weinstein to speak

NOTE: This was just released by the NGS. All inquiries should be addressed to Jeanne Lund, as listed below.

Arlington, VA. 23 February 2007

Archivist of the United States Professor Allen Weinstein to speak at the NGS Conference in the States and Family History Fair, Richmond, VA.

Professor Allen Weinstein, Archivist of the United States, will make opening comments at the National Genealogical Society’s Conference in the States and Family History Fair on Wednesday 16th May, 2007 at the Richmond Marriott Hotel.

Professor Weinstein began his service as the 9th Archivist of the United States in February 2005, leading the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). The mission of NARA is to serve "American democracy by safeguarding and preserving the records of our Government, ensuring that the people discover, use and learn from this documentary heritage." The genealogical community is one of the Archives biggest stakeholders and the records the National Archives preserves including census, immigration and military records, are essential to family history and genealogical research.

Professor Weinstein has previously spoken of the story of America being more than the story of historic figures making landmark decisions – it is the story of individuals and families, seeking and exercising their Constitutional rights, striving for a better life, and nurturing an open and vibrant democracy. These stories are told in records held by the National Archives.

Professor Weinstein will discuss the major goals of NARA as enumerated in its new Strategic Plan and NARA’s intense efforts to develop partnerships with stakeholder groups.

Further information on the NGS Conference in the States & Family History Fair can be found on the NGS website at: www.ngsgenealogy.org

Contact Jeanne Lund
National Genealogical Society – (703) 525-0050, ext. 112. (703) 525-0052 (Fax).
Lund@ngsgenealogy.org
NGS PRESS RELEASE: Librarians' Track

NOTE: This was just released by the NGS. All inquiries should be addressed to Jeanne Lund, as listed below.

---------------------------------------------------------
PRESS RELEASE

Arlington, VA. 23 February, 2007

[Free] Librarians Program at the National Genealogical Society Conference in the States, Richmond, VA

The National Genealogical Society will be holding its annual Conference in the States and Family History Fair from 15-19 May, 2007 at the Richmond Marriott Hotel (500 East Broad Street), and Greater Richmond Convention Center (403 North 3rd Street).

On Tuesday 15th May a special Librarians program, sponsored by ProQuest, will be held at the Library of Virginia (800 East Broad Street). This program is free to all librarians who work with family history patrons or genealogy reference materials. Advance registration is required and space is limited – lunch is limited to the first 115 people who sign up.

Librarians attending this program will hear several excellent speakers. ProQuest will provide lunch for attendees and be available to answer questions about their products.

Presentations on the program will include talks on the digital initiatives of the Library of Virginia, how to help preserve the past using basic archival practices, designing user-friendly research guides for genealogists, and handling genealogical inquiries.

Librarians attending Librarians Day may also want to consider attending the entire NGS conference – which commences on Wednesday, 16th May, and the Family History Fair, which will be open on Wednesday, 16th May, through to Saturday, 19th May.

For full details on the conference, including conference registration fees go to: http://www.eshow2000.com/ngs/2007/

Contact Jeanne Lund
National Genealogical Society – (703) 525-0050, ext. 112. (703) 525-0052 (Fax).
Lund@ngsgenealogy.org
NGS PRESS RELEASE: Scholarship for Home Study Course

NOTE: This was just released by the NGS. All inquiries should be addressed to Jeanne Lund, as listed below.

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Arlington, VA. 23 February 2007

National Genealogical Society announces Scholarship for Home Study Course

The National Genealogical Society, a 501(c) (3) tax-exempt organization, will be awarding one scholarship for the NGS American Genealogy: A Home Study Course. The scholarship will cover the cost of all three CDs as well as the grading of assignments and comments provided by experienced genealogists. This represents a value of $475.

All NGS members pursuing a career in genealogy are encouraged to apply. The course is an in-depth learning opportunity aimed at the intermediate to advanced researcher. Applicants should have previous experience with recording genealogical information, using family and published sources, vital records, and writing some citations for birth, death, and marriage information.
Preference for the scholarship will be given to individuals who have demonstrated serious interest in genealogy by attending regional and/or local conferences, undertaking genealogical training, and subscribing to genealogical publications. The application consists of a form for personal information and an essay. The essay provides the opportunity for applicants to describe why they intend to pursue a career in genealogy; the extent of their research experience, past and current genealogical education; and how the Home Study Course will aid in their career development.

Applicants must submit a completed application by 1 May, 2007. The NGS Scholarship Committee will review all applications. Notification of the award will be made by 15 May, 2007 and announced at the NGS Conference in the States and Family History Fair in Richmond, Virginia.

For further information and for application materials go to the NGS website at: www.ngsgenealogy.org or email scholarship@ngsgenealogy.org

The National Genealogical Society was founded in 1903, and is the premier national society for everyone from the beginner to the most advanced family historian. The NGS serves its members by providing genealogical skill development through education, information, publications, research assistance, and networking opportunities.

Further information on the NGS Conference in the States & Family History Fair can be found at the NGS website at: www.ngsgenealogy.org

Contact Jeanne Lund (703) 525-0050, ext. 112. (703) 525-0052 (Fax).
Lund@ngsgenealogy.org
NGS PRESS RELEASE: Family History Fair 16-19 May 2007

NOTE: This was just released by the NGS. All inquiries should be addressed to Jeanne Lund, as listed below.

---------------------------------------------------------
Arlington, VA. 23 February 2007

Family History Fair at the National Genealogical Society Conference in the States – Richmond, VA

The National Genealogical Society will be holding its annual Conference in the States from 16-19 May 2007. Part of the conference will be a Family History Fair, which will be held at the Greater Richmond Convention Center (403 North 3rd Street), from Wednesday, 16th May, through to Saturday, 19th May.

The Family History Fair will be open on Wednesday 16th May from 9:30am to 5:30pm, Thursday 17th May from 9am to 7pm, Friday 18th May from 9am to 5:30pm, and Saturday 19th May from 9am to 4:30pm.

Admittance to the Family History Fair is free to all. Anybody from the complete beginner to the most experienced genealogist will find something here to help and assist them to research their family history. Vendors will range from genealogical software, booksellers, genealogical and historical societies, professional genealogical organizations, gift sellers, CDs, DNA testing companies, genealogical magazines, map sellers and many many more. The exhibitors will have research materials for most states, with an emphasis on Virginia and the Mid-Atlantic region.

For a full list of confirmed exhibitors go to: http://www.eshow2000.com/ngs/2007/exhibitor_list.cfm

If you are interested in learning more about your family history, consider signing up for the NGS Conference – which will commence on Wednesday 16th May and conclude on Saturday 19th May. There will be more than 100 sessions on the program, and over 8 tracks per day. You may register for the entire conference or daily programs.

For full conference information, including conference fees information, go to: http://www.eshow2000.com/ngs/2007/

Contact Jeanne Lund
National Genealogical Society – (703) 525-0050, ext. 112. (703) 525-0052 (Fax).
Lund@ngsgenealogy.org
NGS PRESS RELEASE: Beginner's Workshop 16-19 May 2007

NOTE: This was just released by the NGS. All inquiries should be addressed to Jeanne Lund, as listed below.

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Arlington, VA. 12th February 2007

National Genealogical Society to hold Beginner’s Workshop at the NGS Conference in the States and Family History Fair, Richmond, VA.

The National Genealogical Society will be holding its annual Conference in the States and Family History Fair from 16-19 May 2007.

The Beginner’s Workshop will take place on Saturday, 19th May, from 8am – 12 Noon, at the Richmond Marriott Hotel (500 East Broad Street).

Anyone interested in tracing their family history/genealogy and who needs guidance on where to start will find this workshop very beneficial. Led by experienced genealogists, this workshop will guide participants through how to organize what you know, and how to search for what you don’t know.

The workshop is limited to 50 participants. A registration fee of $25 covers the workshop fee and all related materials. Sign-up information is available at: http://www.eshow2000.com/ngs/2007/. Please note – you do not need to register for the entire conference to attend this workshop.

If you are interested in learning more about family history research, sign up for the NGS Conference – which will commence on Wednesday 16th May and conclude on Saturday 19th May. You may register for the entire conference or daily programs.

The NGS Conference in the States will also feature a Family History Fair at the Greater Richmond Convention Center – which is just across the road from the Richmond Marriott Hotel. The Family History Fair is free admittance to all, and will be open Wednesday through Saturday. On hand will be many genealogical vendors – including software, books, magazines, genealogical societies, and so on. For Family History Fair opening hours please go to: http://www.eshow2000.com/ngs/2007/exhibits.cfm

For a full list of exhibitors confirmed so far, go to: http://www.eshow2000.com/ngs/2007/exhibitor_list.cfm

Further information on the NGS Conference in the States & Family History Fair, including registration fee information, can be found on the NGS website at: www.ngsgenealogy.org

Contact Jeanne Lund
National Genealogical Society – (703) 525-0050, ext. 112. (703) 525-0052 (Fax).
Lund@ngsgenealogy.org
England & Wales: Internet Access to Birth, Marriage & Deaths

DearREADERS,
Special thanks to Geoff Riggs, Chairman, Federation of Family History Societies for bringing the topic to my attention through a FHNet mailing list at Yahoo:

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Internet access to GRO indexes
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"The Office for National Statistics (ONS) today announced that facilities to search indexes of births, marriages and deaths will start to be available on the Internet from early 2008.
The electronic index for the majority of birth registrations and deaths registrations from 1837 to 1958 is expected to be available by early 2008, providing an option for the public to trace an index reference online and request the certificate at the same time without the need to visit a central facility.

ONS intends to close its public search facility, currently located at the Family Records Centre (FRC) in Islington in early 2008 and make index information available at The National Archives (TNA) in Kew. This will enable researchers to access GRO records as well as making use of the wider opportunities offered by Kew for researching historic records.

Searches for all other GRO records which have not yet been datacaptured will still need the manual index books or microfiche, and for a short time these will be available at Kew. They will be withdrawn when the equivalent electronic index is made available.

The relocation is expected to be complete by April 2008. The services currently provided by ONS in Islington will then cease. For more information download the ONS press release (pdf , 61k)"

See: http://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/news/accessing--gro--indexes--on--the--internet.asp

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So, DearREADERS, such action will greatly facilitate family history research. Would that all governments would view digital resources as a method of making available such public documents.


Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------
Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

(c) 2007 - All Rights Reserved.

Thursday, February 22, 2007

NARA to Dedicate Southwest Regional Records Center Facility, First Federal Electronic Records Vault Opens

NOTE FROM DearMYRTLE: The following was just received from the National Archives. It should be noted that the website for this facility further explains "As a center for historical and genealogical research, we have both an Archival and Microfilm Research Room for researchers. Our historical records date from the 1800s to the late 1900s, and include letters, photographs, maps, architectural drawings, and other documents received from over 100 Federal agencies and courts in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Texas." See: http://www.archives.gov/southwest/index.html

-----Original Message-----
From: Public Affairs Public.Affairs@nara.gov
Sent: Thursday, February 22, 2007 7:01 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 22, 2007

National Archives to Dedicate new Southwest Regional Records Center Facility, First Federal Electronic Records Vault Opens

Fort Worth, TX . . . The National Archives and Records Administration will formally dedicate its new Southwest Region Federal Records Center in the Carter Industrial Park (1400 John Burgess Drive, Ft. Worth, Texas 76140) at 11:00 a.m. on Friday, March 2, 2007. Confirmed speakers include Fort Worth Councilwoman Kathleen Hicks, Fort Worth Mayor Mike Moncrief, and Congressman Michael C. Burgess. The event will also feature a ribbon-cutting ceremony and a barbecue lunch. The ceremony is open to the press and by invitation to National Archives Southwest Region staff, community leaders, and guests from other Federal agencies.

The facility includes a 1000 square-foot, state-of-the-art electronic records storage vault that will allow the National Archives, for the first time in its 73-year history, to store and service temporary electronic records for Federal agencies. This electronic records storage vault features a non-aqueous fire suppression system, strict environmental controls, and multiple levels of security. The new facility also includes a high-tech digital imaging lab for record scanning and a specialized media disintegrator to securely destroy Federal e-records.

"The new Federal Records Center is an exciting project for the National Archives as we modernize the facilities that house these important Federal records" said Preston Huff, the National Archives Regional Administrator for the Southwest Region. "This building reflects our recognition that the format of our Nation’s records has evolved from paper to a variety of electronic media. The National Archives stands ready to store and service these e-records from their creation to their destruction, just as we have for years with paper records."

The 205,000 square foot building has a total storage capacity of nearly one million cubic feet of records. The new facility will replace the Federal Records Center currently located in the Fort Worth Federal Depot. The move to the new building is scheduled to be completed in October of this year.

The National Archives Southwest Region is one of 15 National Archives regional facilities nationwide. This facility serves 100 Federal agency customers in Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas. Significant holdings include Federal records created by the regional U.S. District/Bankruptcy Courts, the Internal Revenue Service, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA*Johnson Space Flight Center), the Department of Energy, the Department of the Navy, and the Department of Homeland Security.

K/H Lakewood., LLC, greater Kansas City’s oldest commercial real estate company, developed the site. The National Archives and K/H Lakewood have entered into a 20-year lease for the building.

THE PRESS IS INVITED TO COVER THE CEREMONY. The site is located at 1400 John Burgess Drive (at the intersection of Oak Grove Road). The ceremony begins promptly at 11:00 A.M. Directions: From downtown Fort Worth, take I-35W South to Exit #42 (Everman Parkway). Turn left onto Everman Parkway (look for the National Archives signs). Turn left onto Will Rogers Boulevard. Turn right onto John Burgess Drive.

# # #
For press information, contact C. Preston Huff, Regional Administrator-Southwest Region at: 817-831-5627.
07-62


Tuesday, February 20, 2007

Finding Ponce grandparents

From: Harlem123
DearMYRTLE,
The only info I have on my grandparents is the story told me that my grandfather was once chief of police of the city of Ponce, Puerto Rico. I have written & called, [receiving] no help from Ponce Archivos Historical, or city hall for that matter. Is there any other archive on the island? -- Thanks Harlem

DearHARLEM,
For my readers who don't know where Ponce is, here is a brief description:

PONCE (PON-sai)- "With a population of 194,636, Ponce is Puerto Rico's third largest city. Ponce is known as "La Perla del Sur" (pearl of the south) and "La Ciudad de los Leones" (city of lions). Ponce was founded in 1692 by Juan Ponce de León's great-grandson - Loíza Ponce de León." For further details, see: http://welcome.topuertorico.org/city/ponce.shtml

Now for some suggestions for finding your Grandfather SOTO:

1. Realize that most archives and libraries will not do research for you.

2. Most people do not know anything more than the names and perhaps birthplaces of their grandparents, and think this is a brick wall. Yet it is possible to use original documents (usually found on microfilm) to prove family relationships starting with your birth record which lists your parents, and working back in time to your parents' birth records, which lists THEIR parents, etc.

3. For the locality of Ponce, Puerto Rico, there are microfilms of Catholic Church (1753-1948), Civil Registration (1839-1996) and Census records (1816-1901) for you to work through personally. This is assuming that your Grandfather SOTO lived in Ponce, and didn't just work there.

4. You will educate yourself about how to do genealogical research using published how-to guides, online newsletters & mailing lists.

5. You'll use a genealogy management program (some are available in Spanish) to record your ancestors' names, dates and places.

6. You will share your finding with your family & members of the genealogical community, in paper, CD or internet format. You will be sure to protect the privacy of the living individuals in your database.

---------------------------------------------------------
LATIN AMERICAN RESEARCH OUTLINE
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Follow the best advice of the specialists at the Family History Library who know how to do research in Puerto Rico. The most recent version is located on the web at:http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/RG/frameset_rg.asp?Dest=G1&Aid=&Gid=&Lid=&Sid=&Did=&Juris1=&Event=&Year=&Gloss=&Sub=&Tab=&Entry=&Guide=Latin_America.ASP

PRINT out every page, and work through it religiously. This is what Ol' Myrt does when she turns to an area where she has never done ancestral research.

---------------------------------------------------------
FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY CATALOG - TOWN OF PONCE
http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/FHLC/frameset_fhlc.asp
---------------------------------------------------------
When searching for the place "Ponce" in "Puerto Rico" (without the quote marks), Ol' Myrt came across the following matching locations in the catalog:

-- Puerto Rico, Ponce (This means the country, then county/province)

-- Puerto Rico, Ponce, Ponce (This means the country, then county/province, then town)

-- Puerto Rico, Ponce, Playa de Ponce

When looking at the TOWN of Ponce, I found:

-- Registros parroquiales, 1753-1948 Iglesia Católica. Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe (Ponce, Ponce). This is a phenominal collection of 16 microfilm, which has the christenings, marriages & burials for the local Catholic church. To use the microfilm, look in the "front" section of each volume to see if the priest created a quasi index for the volume. This is a method where one letter of the alphabet is allotted one or two pages, and the name for the individual is listed in chronological order, so on the "S" page, you will find all the surnames (family names) beginning with the letter "S" are thrown together. Be sure to read the entire section for SOTO.

The catalog further explains the breakdown of records on each microfilm:

Note - Location [Film]
Indice de bautismos, 1850-1899 - FHL INTL Film [ 820693 Items 1-4 ] Indice de bautismos, 1899-1907 - FHL INTL Film [ 820693 Item 6 ] Indice de bautismos, 1906-1914 - FHL INTL Film [ 820693 Item 5 ] Indice de bautismos, 1914-1948 - FHL INTL Film [ 820693 Items 7-11 ] Bautismos, 1836-1885 (certificados, 1881-1898, de bautismos, matrimonios, y defunciones--para información matrimonial; faltan años, en desorden cronológico) - FHL INTL Film [ 820708 Items 3-5 ] Bautismos, 1753,1838-1900 (años faltan; en desorden cronológico) - FHL INTL Film [ 820694 Item 1 ] Bautismos, 1850-1859 - FHL INTL Film [ 820694 Items 2-8 ] Bautismos, 1860-1869 - FHL INTL Film [ 820695 ] Bautismos, 1865-1928 (años faltan; en orden cronológico) - VAULT INTL Film [ 820696 ] Bautismos, 1880-1887,1910,1928 (en desorden cronológico) - FHL INTL Film [ 820697 ] Bautismos, 1872-1921 (años faltan; en desorden cronológico) - FHL INTL Film [ 820698 ] Bautismos, 1893-1915 (años faltan; en desorden cronológico) - FHL INTL Film [ 820699 ] Bautismos, 1905-1912 - FHL INTL Film [ 820700 ] Bautismos, 1912-1920 - FHL INTL Film [ 820701 ] Bautismos, 1920-1921 - FHL INTL Film [ 820702 Items 1-2 ] Confirmaciones, 1880-1938 (faltan años) - FHL INTL Film [ 820702 Items 3-4 ] Matrimonios, 1836-1898 (Certificados, 1881-1898, de bautismos, matrimonios, y defunciones--para información matrimonial; faltan años; en desorden cronológico) - FHL INTL Film [ 820708 Items 3-5 ] Matrimonios, 1850-1884 - FHL INTL Film [ 820702 Items 5-7 ] Matrimonios, 1884-1921 - FHL INTL Film [ 820703 Items 1-6 ] Defunciones, 1835-1898 (Certificados, 1881-1898, de bautismos, matrimonios, y defunciones--para información matrionial; faltan años; en desorden cronológico) - FHL INTL Film [ 820708 Items 3-5 ] Defunciones, 1854-1857 - FHL INTL Film [ 820703 Items 7-8 ] Defunciones, 1857-1866 - VAULT INTL Film [ 820704 Items 1-7 ] Defunciones, 1860-1862 - FHL INTL Film [ 820708 Item 2 ] Defunciones, 1866-1868 - VAULT INTL Film [ 820704 Item 9 ] Defunciones, 1868 - VAULT INTL Film [ 820705 Item 1 ] Defunciones, 1870-1871 - VAULT INTL Film [ 820704 Item 8 ] Defunciones, 1871-1876 - VAULT INTL Film [ 820705 Items 2-6 ] Defunciones, 1876-1880 - VAULT INTL Film [ 820705 Items 8-9 ] Defunciones, 1880-1881 - VAULT INTL Film [ 820705 Item 7 ] Defunciones, 1881-1882 - VAULT INTL Film [ 820705 Item 10 ] Defunciones 1882-1892 - FHL INTL Film [ 820706 ] Defunciones, 1892-1920 - FHL INTL Film [ 820707 ] Defunciones, 1920-1923, 1937-1940 - FHL INTL Film [ 820708 Item 1 ]:
© 2002 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved.


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FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY CATALOG -
CIVIL REGISTRATION PONCE
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-- Defunciones, índice de nichos 1843-1918 (sin orden cronológico) FHL INTL Film 1666986 Items 1-6

-- Nacimientos y defunciones 1839-1882 (sin orden cronológico) FHL INTL Film 1667068 Items 3-4

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LOCATE A FAMILY HISTORY CENTER (FHC) NEAR YOU
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The films mentioned are available in the Family History Library (FHL) in Salt Lake City and are not viewable on the internet. Alternatively, you may order and view them at a local LDS Family History Center, which is typically housed in the same building as the local LDS Church. There are exceptions, in that a few public libraries have a Family History Library affiliation. Patrons do not have to be LDS to use these facilities. To locate one near you, go to: http://www.FamilySearch.org and fill in the information on the main screen to search for specific addresses in the State of New York where you reside. I think your closest bet will be in the Bronx.

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ORDER MICROFILM
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Since there are over 3 million rolls of microfilm in the FHL collection (from over 80 countries throughout the world) you'll most likely have to order the microfilm you wish to view. The cost to order covers the postage, and includes options for short term, long term and indefinite loan of the microfilm to the FHC near you.

You'll want to order the microfilm where you expect to find your Grandfather SOTO. Perhaps looking for your father/mother's birth record, where your Grandfather SOTO would appear as the father. When you get so far back in time that there were no civil registration records kept, switch over to the church records.

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HAVING SAID ALL THAT, REMEMBER TO CHECK
PREVIOUSLY COMPILED RESEARCH BEFORE
DOING ANY OF THE ABOVE
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A. It just might be that a here-to-fore unknown distant cousin has already been doing genealogy research on your family. Find pedigrees at:

-- www.FamilySearch.org
-- www.RootsWeb.com

B. Search the Message Boards at RootsWeb/Ancestry for each of your known ancestors by name. http://boards.rootsweb.com/Default.aspx

Be sure to spell the name in a variety of creative ways. Spelling typically isn't consistent. I have an ancestor who purchased property on the Patuxent River in Maryland in the 1670s. His name was spelled 3 different ways in the document, and he signed it with a 4th spelling. I just looked, and found there is a SOTO surname message board: http://boards.rootsweb.com/surnames.soto/mb.ashx

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FOR FURTHER READING
---------------------------------------------------------
-- Hispanic Genealogical Society of New York -
http://www.hispanicgenealogy.com NOTE: Next members meeting is scheduled for March 3, 2007, at La Casa del la Herencia Cultural Puertorriqueña, Inc. located at 1230 Fifth Avenue, (corner of 104th Street) Suite 458, NYC, New York.

-- Puerto Rican/Hispanic Genealogical Society (very active in NY!) http://www.rootsweb.com/~prhgs/

-- Puerto Rican Roots http://www.prroots.com/

-- Somos Primos (an online e-zine of news!) http://www.somosprimos.com/

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------

Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com

(c) 2007 All Rights Reserved
David Ensign Gardner RIP

Noted genealogist and teacher he was a Fellow of the Society of Genealogists (UK) and the co-author of the well-known standard genealogical text: Genealogical Research in England and Wales, a three volume set.

His funeral will be Tuesday, Feb 20th.

Deseret News, The (Salt Lake City, UT) - February 18, 2007
Deceased Name: David Ensign Gardner His obituary, from
www.GenealogyBank.com
David E. Gardner 1915 ~ 2007

David Ensign Gardner has gone to be with his Heavenly Father and beloved family who went before him. Born November 17, 1915 in Birkenhead, Cheshire, England to Captain John Gardner and Mary Caldwell. David's ancestry shows that he has three grandparents who are Scottish and one that is English. David was the ninth child of 10 and is the last child to live to 2007. David was baptized into the LDS Church in Liverpool, England 22 February 1927 and lived the gospel of Jesus Christ all his life.

David had a love for genealogical research, and during the 1930s and 1940s, in the British Isles, became a great British researcher. He lived in the Liverpool area until 1943 when he was called to America and arrived in New York on Labor Day 1948. David came to Salt Lake City where he joined the Genealogical Staff of the LDS Church.

He met his eternal companion, Mariel Pack, and they were married 25 June 1953 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. Mariel passed away in 1985. Two sons were born, Matthew in 1958, and Mark in 1961. Mark married his eternal companion Melissa Kimball and they have eight children.

David became an author of genealogical books and is well known for co-authoring with Frank Smith, Genealogical Research in England and Wales, a three volume set. David was an inspired teacher and lecturer in British Genealogy and taught at BYU. He was a Fellow of the Society of Genealogists, London, England.

David was a tour director with BYU from 1960 to 1976, taking people back to the British Isles for Family History purposes. David worked for the LDS Church and retired in 1985. David stayed on as a volunteer finishing the Scottish extraction program in 1993. David was well known for his genealogical abilities and loved the time spent with many on their pedigrees in family history; he had a lifelong pursuit of helping others.

His last years were spent with his family and he passed away 15 February 2007 as Mariel came to take him to heaven on Valentine's Day. The funeral will be Tuesday, 20 February 2007, 12 noon at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints chapel located on A Street between 2nd and 3rd Avenue in Salt Lake City, Utah. Viewing will be 6-8 p.m. Monday evening 19 February 2007 at the Larkin Mortuary, 260 East South Temple (801/363-5781); and Tuesday 11-11:45 a.m. at the chapel, prior to the funeral service.

Sunday, February 18, 2007

Reading DearMYRTLE columns

DearREADERS,

Let's review the possibilities:

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ONLINE VIEWING
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2007 Columns to present -
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com
Some 1995 - all 2006 columns - www.DearMYRTLE.com (do a "search" for the topic that interests you, since they are not all listed under "read".)

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RSS FORMAT
---------------------------------------------------------
IF YOU USE SHARP READER for your RSS reader, simply subscribe to the following feed:
http://dearmyrtle.blogspot.com/atom.xml

NOTE the above is NOT a web address, it is the xml (or RSS) feed for DearMYRTLE's blog feed.

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EMAIL LIST POSTINGS
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This method is NOT desirable, since email filters often block delivery. Also Ancestry.com computers for mailing lists doesn't always distribute on a timely basis. I cannot tell you how many people wrote to complain that my email list posting about GenealogyBank didn't arrive in their email boxes until AFTER the free offer had expired.

For this reason, I am not providing the information on how to use DearMYRTLE's mailing list. I expect I will phase this out before the end of the year 2007.

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WRITING TO Ol' Myrt
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Remember that Ol' Myrt receives about 700 pieces of email from individuals each day. It would be impossible to respond to each individually. I do read every email, notice trends, and choose one for a column from time to time.

Email: Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Message Board: (I look there about twice a week.) However, the boards have moved twice (without notice) and sometimes they do not work at all.
http://boards.ancestry.com/topics.methods.dearmyrtle/mb.ashx

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)

DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
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Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com
ACROSS MY DESK: Legacy Cruise to Hawaii with Dick Eastman

NOTE: This is just in from Geoff Rasmussen of LegacyFamilyTree.com. All inquiries should be addressed to him. See his blog at: http://legacynews.typepad.com

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Dick Eastman to be featured speaker on
Legacy Cruise to Hawaii
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The upcoming Legacy Cruise to Hawaii just got better - irresistible perhaps. One of genealogy's biggest names will be our featured speaker - Dick Eastman!

Dick is the author of Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter, the leading newsletter for genealogy news and technology tips. For some 30+ years, he has been honing his vision of the future to improve our picture of the past. In the mid-1980s, Dick went knocking on the door of a rising internet star called CompuServe to propose a genealogy forum: a move by which he built a community of family historians over the next 14 years. At the same time, he preached the benefits of technology to an even wider audience of genealogists, including national and international genealogical organizations, and of course, GENTECH, an organization that helped him to spread his message.

Through his newsletter, Dick shares technology "finds" that can help both new and seasoned genealogists, as well as dethroning the scams and shams that can lead the unwary astray.

Genealogy Classes at Sea Dick will join the Legacy Family Tree experts to present our best offerings of classes we've ever had. In additional to classes on using Legacy, Dick will present an outstanding offering of instruction on how technology aids genealogists.

12 Day Hawaii cruise from Vancouver, BC, Canada

Our 4th annual Legacy cruise will leave from Vancouver, BC on September 19, 2007 and visit Maui, Kauai, Hilo, Kona, and Honolulu. You'll see spectacular mountains, verdant forests, active volcanoes, and shimmering, thundering waterfalls. We want you to see the unsurpassed beauty of Hawaii in the grandest way possible. Your "Fun Ship" cruise visits four fascinating Hawaiian islands, with overnights in Honolulu and Maui. Bring lots of film so you can show your friends back home the unbelievable beauty and amazing colors of Hawaii.

Pricing
Prices begin at US $1140.38 per person, double occupancy, port charges, taxes and Legacy classes are included in the price.


Inside cabin at the rate of US $1140.38 per person.

Ocean view cabin at the rate of $1340.38 per person.

Balcony cabin at the rate of $1570.38 per person.

That's less than $100 a day for a vacation of a lifetime. You can't even get a hotel for that price. In fact, this entire vacation, which includes lodging, food, conference fees, etc., can be cheaper than a 3-4 day attendance at a national conference:

hotel - at least $100 a night

food - $30 a day (if you're trying to lose weight) conference fees - $150-250 Reservations

For more information, frequently asked questions, and reservations, visit http://legacyfamilytree.com/CruiseInfo_2007.asp

Space is limited. Hope to see you there.
READERS' FEEDBACK: Paper vs. online newsletters

DearREADERS,
In December 2006, Ol' Myrt here posted a topic to her blog
http://www.blog.dearmyrtle.com
that referenced a gentleman who was hoping to solicit interest in a paper-only format for his surname. I posed the following questions to readers:

1. Would you personally prefer a hard copy or a digital version of a newsletter to save or print out on your own computer?

2 Do you think that more people will benefit from the newsletter in hard copy or via the internet?

THANK-YOUR, dear, thoughtful readers for your replies. The majority of responses are represented below:

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RUNNING OUT OF ROOM - ONLINE IS BEST
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From: Patricia.A.Crossett@Dartmouth.EDU
DearMYRTLE,
Online, definitely. I am interested in the data, not the paper holding the data. We have too small a house for all the pieces of paper that I need to verify family history data, but have a nice hard disk which stores images as well as text beautifully and is great source storage.

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WE'RE USING COMPUTERS TO DO GENEALOGY ANYWAY
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From: Mary Ward thatsme2@pahrump.com
DearMYRTLE,
Digital format is much more convenient for the majority of us. Source documentation is therefore already in our computers, saving us the time/effort to scan the information. It would also lower the cost to us. Perhaps the gentleman could offer both - that would be the best of both worlds. I personally would not even consider subscribing to a "paper" newsletter anymore. Keep up the great work Myrt - I gain much knowledge from you. Thank you so much!!

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CONTRIBUTORS RECEIVE FREE ACCESS FOR 3 MONTHS
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From: Teresa Elliott Cheasa@bellsouth.net
DearMYRTLE,
I was a member of the Users Group of Virginia for TMG [The Master Genealogist] for a few years. Their newsletter is online and requires a password to access. I never gave out the password to anyone and while I was a member, I wrote articles for which my membership was extended for a period of time based on the number of articles. Perhaps this gentleman could do the same. If a family member writes an article, give them 3 months free. Personally I think $30-40 is a little high though, more like $15-20 would be reasonable.

There's no guarantee that with paper, I won't subscribe, copy it and pass it out to my cousins either. People have been doing that for years too. And in this day and age, anyone interested in genealogy enough to read his newsletter will either have a computer, or have access to one (most libraries offer this service for free.)

Now I personally prefer paper. But as you said, I can print it out of that is what I want. It would certainly be cheaper to produce, which means more profit in his pocket if he would put it online.
Teresa Ghee Elliott
--
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~rutherfordcemetery/
All I want for Christmas is to know who is George's father is... I've been good.

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MORE PEOPLE CAN FIND IT ON THE INTERNET
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From: Jasskirv@aol.com
Interesting concerns, that this gentleman worries about non-computer readers who, I suspect would be older persons, like myself, who have come late to the electronic age. To answer your questions:


1. I am getting very bad about getting my papers in order and tend to file things in the wrong place, so a digital version which I could save in an appropriate file, would probably be best for me. BUT, I really, really, prefer to read things on paper, so if I found the newsletter interesting enough, I would probably print out the parts I wished to read away from the computer.

2. I think my answer to the above covers this. I think more people would find the newsletter if published on the Internet, but so many of us who are retired on limited incomes, might be resistant to subscribing to anything that costs very much.

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QUERIES PROVIDE BREAKTHROUGHS
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From: rutucker@cfu.net
DearMYRTLE,
My thoughts on this topic are the "more the merrier". I would certainly encourage people to publish their information in as many media as they are able. I don't view my research, even copies of documents I have obtained, as my personal possessions. Even though I have spent time and possibly money (much of my information and documentation has resulted from contact with generous persons), anything I have I want preserved for future generations and feel it should be available to as many persons as possible.

If I can share my papers, I am paying back those generous persons who have shared with me without accepting any compensation.

I have had two very unexpected contacts with persons who have found queries in the last couple years that I placed on newslists in 1996 when I first went online. If that contact had not been out there in cyberspace, I would have possibly never found the family of a sister (Elizabeth Matthews who married ( ) Muma) of my g-g-grandfather who remained in Canada when the family came to Illinois about 1840. A kind gentleman in Canada found my query when he was searching the Coleman name (a surname in the family) and has provided me with reams of documents from the Canadian archives near his home, refusing any compensation for copying or postage or time. I now have documents for her. She had married and stayed in Canada raising a large family. There are many descendants of hers still living in the area. It has become a very enjoyable correspondence with a possible Coleman cousin. Elizabeth's mother was a Coleman. We're still working on that line.

Another instance was the lost information of my g-grandfather on my father's side in Illinois. I always had a question of why I couldn't locate any information on my g-grandmother's family, Breivogel/Brochwogal. This was answered by a unknown cousin's daughter who saw my query in 2001, and provided ship list information and obituaries as well as other contacts of the Hildebrandt family in Illinois of which I had no knowledge. My g-grandfather and Ida had been married near Berlin, Germany, and 2 days later left for the United States on a ship bound for New Orleans. They were accompanied by 2 of his sisters and their families. Opened up a who new line for me. We shared information which helped plug some of those holes I had previously struggled to locate.

I've rambled on long enough. Thanks for sharing your insights.

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CHEATERS WILL FIND A WAY
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From: Jffoltzgen@aol.com
DearMYRTLE,
I agree online is quicker and easier. In regard to sending it to others to avoid the subscription fee, what precludes someone from photo coping or scanning the paper newsletter and mailing it to someone else? Most genealogists have computers or they would miss out on a valuable resource. A computerized version would attract a larger audience. He can scan original source documents. He could control website access to paying customers.

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CD FORMAT TO KEEP COSTS DOWN
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From: jloudon@nc.rr.com
DearMYRTLE,
I am an old bird but now love the computer. I know how to add the graphics to the newsletter so doing it digitally is better for me. In a genealogy group I made calendars for all the members and printed them out. This cost me $300 which the group reimbursed me but it cut into the funds available for the group. Next year we will post each month as it goes and if someone wants to print the calendar I will burn and send a CD and they can go to local shop and print themselves.
I take stories we have found and do a scrapbook page and print 8.5 x 14.


We have a monthly newsletter which is all words. Most of the group are better researchers and I am only one with any knowledge of graphics or the programs to do it in.

Example of one month - [SPECIAL Thanks to MARCIA for sharing. The blog version of this column provides a link to this sample page <http://www.dearmyrtle.com/07/0219april.jpg> from Marcia's scrapbook page. VERY GOOD WORK, Marcia!]

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)

DearMYRTLE, your friend in genealogy
---------------------------------------------------------
Snail Mail Address:
227 Bellevue Way NE PMB 544
Bellevue, WA 98004
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
http://www.DearMYRTLE.com