Wednesday, December 31, 2008

WVR: New England content from Genealogical Publishing

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was posted today by our friends at World Vital Records. Please address all inquiries to whitney.ransom@worldvitalrecords.com.

New England Content Added From Genealogical Publishing Company

The major [new] collection this week includes five databases from Genealogical Publishing Company. These databases will be free to access for ten days. The databases included in this week’s launch are:
  • Abstracts of Wills and Inventories, Fairfax County, Virginia, 1742–1801
  • Forks of Elkhorn Church: With Genealogies of Early Members Reprinted with Numerous Additions and Corrections
  • Early New York Naturalizations: Abstracts of Naturalizations Records from Federal, State, and Local Courts, 1792–1840
  • Families of Ancient New Haven, Volume 1
  • Families of Ancient New Haven, Volume 2
  • Abstracts of Wills and Inventories, Fairfax County, Virginia, 1742– 1801
    The information included in this database generally includes the name of the testator, dates of instrument and probate, and the names of the spouse, children and other family members, executors, and witnesses. Inventory abstracts usually contain the reference to the administrator, and the inventory date. Also included are the Rent Rolls of 1761 and 1774.
  • Abstracts of Wills and Inventories, Fairfax County, Virginia, 1742–1801
  • Forks of Elkhorn Church: With Genealogies of Early Members Reprinted with Numerous Additions and Corrections
    Situated near the conjunction of Franklin, Woodford, and Scott counties, Kentucky, the Elkhorn Church was a magnet for persons of the Baptist faith who had suffered under the established church in Virginia. Several hundred families are traced here by means of entries in the old minute book, family Bibles, wills, land records, tax lists, census records, and in a variety of other sources.
  • Early New York Naturalizations: Abstracts of Naturalizations Records from Federal, State, and Local Courts, 1792–1840
    Of all the records in the public domain no single research group presents such an obstacle to the researcher as naturalization records. Unlike other public records they are not consolidated in a convenient archive, but are housed instead in a bewildering number of local and municipal repositories—courts, city archives, and record centers—where they remain the least accessible of genealogical records. This is extremely unfortunate because they are practically without equal in genealogical value. In this new work, however, D. Kenneth Scott has made a magnificent start in shaping these records into accessible form, herein presenting a comprehensive body of abstracts from the sprawling mass of New York naturalization records for the period 1792 to 1840.

    The naturalizations and declarations of intention abstracted in this volume—some 10,000 of them—are arranged in more or less chronological order by courts and jurisdiction. Information given in the original documents varies considerably and is so reflected in the abstracts. The earlier records usually include the name of the petitioner (the alien), his country of origin, the name of the person who recommended him, and his place of residence. The later records usually indicate for each petitioner his name, place of residence, age, place of birth, port and approximate date of arrival in America, his occupation, the names and ages of his wife and children, and various other particulars.
  • Families of Ancient New Haven, Volumes 1 and 2
    Families of Ancient New Haven was created by Donald Lines Jacobus between 1923 and 1932. These volumes were originally published as New Haven Genealogical Magazine, which was the predecessor of The American Genealogist. The complete work contains more than 65,000 names of early Connecticut settlers and their descendents.

    From the Introduction to Volume 1:
    "The following compilation includes the families of the ancient town of New Haven, covering the present towns of New Haven, East Haven, North Haven, Hamden, Bethany, Woodbridge, and West Haven. These families are brought down to the heads of families in the First Census (1790), and include the generation born about 1790 to 1800. Descendants in the male line who removed from this region are also given, if obtainable, to about 1800, unless they have been adequately set forth in published genealogies.

    It is intended to give every record of birth or baptism to 1800, every record of marriage to 1810, and every record of death of individuals born prior to 1800 in the above towns. All dates derived from the public records are followed by an abbreviated reference in italics, indicating their source. A key to these abbreviations is provided. The vital records of six towns, the registers of seven churches, and the inscriptions in twenty-seven graveyards have been copied The probate, land and court records have been searched, as far as they relate to families that settled in this region prior to 1750. Much material has also been gathered from probate and town records of districts and towns outside of this region. Dates not followed by symbols are usually from printed authorities which, although unverified, are considered trustworthy."

SOURCE: http://www.worldvitalrecords.com/news/Volume3Issue14/?page=major&cpn=wvrnewsletter6&offer=1