Wednesday, December 31, 2008

WVR: New England content from Genealogical Publishing

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was posted today by our friends at World Vital Records. Please address all inquiries to whitney.ransom@worldvitalrecords.com.

New England Content Added From Genealogical Publishing Company

The major [new] collection this week includes five databases from Genealogical Publishing Company. These databases will be free to access for ten days. The databases included in this week’s launch are:
  • Abstracts of Wills and Inventories, Fairfax County, Virginia, 1742–1801
  • Forks of Elkhorn Church: With Genealogies of Early Members Reprinted with Numerous Additions and Corrections
  • Early New York Naturalizations: Abstracts of Naturalizations Records from Federal, State, and Local Courts, 1792–1840
  • Families of Ancient New Haven, Volume 1
  • Families of Ancient New Haven, Volume 2
  • Abstracts of Wills and Inventories, Fairfax County, Virginia, 1742– 1801
    The information included in this database generally includes the name of the testator, dates of instrument and probate, and the names of the spouse, children and other family members, executors, and witnesses. Inventory abstracts usually contain the reference to the administrator, and the inventory date. Also included are the Rent Rolls of 1761 and 1774.
  • Abstracts of Wills and Inventories, Fairfax County, Virginia, 1742–1801
  • Forks of Elkhorn Church: With Genealogies of Early Members Reprinted with Numerous Additions and Corrections
    Situated near the conjunction of Franklin, Woodford, and Scott counties, Kentucky, the Elkhorn Church was a magnet for persons of the Baptist faith who had suffered under the established church in Virginia. Several hundred families are traced here by means of entries in the old minute book, family Bibles, wills, land records, tax lists, census records, and in a variety of other sources.
  • Early New York Naturalizations: Abstracts of Naturalizations Records from Federal, State, and Local Courts, 1792–1840
    Of all the records in the public domain no single research group presents such an obstacle to the researcher as naturalization records. Unlike other public records they are not consolidated in a convenient archive, but are housed instead in a bewildering number of local and municipal repositories—courts, city archives, and record centers—where they remain the least accessible of genealogical records. This is extremely unfortunate because they are practically without equal in genealogical value. In this new work, however, D. Kenneth Scott has made a magnificent start in shaping these records into accessible form, herein presenting a comprehensive body of abstracts from the sprawling mass of New York naturalization records for the period 1792 to 1840.

    The naturalizations and declarations of intention abstracted in this volume—some 10,000 of them—are arranged in more or less chronological order by courts and jurisdiction. Information given in the original documents varies considerably and is so reflected in the abstracts. The earlier records usually include the name of the petitioner (the alien), his country of origin, the name of the person who recommended him, and his place of residence. The later records usually indicate for each petitioner his name, place of residence, age, place of birth, port and approximate date of arrival in America, his occupation, the names and ages of his wife and children, and various other particulars.
  • Families of Ancient New Haven, Volumes 1 and 2
    Families of Ancient New Haven was created by Donald Lines Jacobus between 1923 and 1932. These volumes were originally published as New Haven Genealogical Magazine, which was the predecessor of The American Genealogist. The complete work contains more than 65,000 names of early Connecticut settlers and their descendents.

    From the Introduction to Volume 1:
    "The following compilation includes the families of the ancient town of New Haven, covering the present towns of New Haven, East Haven, North Haven, Hamden, Bethany, Woodbridge, and West Haven. These families are brought down to the heads of families in the First Census (1790), and include the generation born about 1790 to 1800. Descendants in the male line who removed from this region are also given, if obtainable, to about 1800, unless they have been adequately set forth in published genealogies.

    It is intended to give every record of birth or baptism to 1800, every record of marriage to 1810, and every record of death of individuals born prior to 1800 in the above towns. All dates derived from the public records are followed by an abbreviated reference in italics, indicating their source. A key to these abbreviations is provided. The vital records of six towns, the registers of seven churches, and the inscriptions in twenty-seven graveyards have been copied The probate, land and court records have been searched, as far as they relate to families that settled in this region prior to 1750. Much material has also been gathered from probate and town records of districts and towns outside of this region. Dates not followed by symbols are usually from printed authorities which, although unverified, are considered trustworthy."

SOURCE: http://www.worldvitalrecords.com/news/Volume3Issue14/?page=major&cpn=wvrnewsletter6&offer=1

UVPAFUG meeting location 10 Jan 2009

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was just received from our friends at the Utah Valley PAF Users Group. Note the change in their meeting place. Address all inquiries to Don at snowd@math.byu.edu.

UTAH VALLEY PAF USERS GROUP MEETING AND NEW LOCATION

The next regular, second-Saturday-of-the-month meeting of the Utah Valley PAF (Personal Ancestral File) Users Group will be on Saturday, 10 Jan 2009, from 9 am until noon IN THE EDGEWOOD/RIVERSIDE LDS CHAPEL, 3511 North 180 East, Provo, Utah. NOTE THE CHANGE IN LOCATION.

This LDS chapel is within one mile of the old location and is behind the Jamestown shopping plaza on the east side of University Avenue in the "River Bottoms" part of Provo. You get to it by going on 3700 North east from University Avenue and then south on 180 East. See the map showing the new and old locations on our website given below.

The main presentation will be by Michael Ritchey on THE FAMILYSEARCH WIKI: HOW IT CAN HELP NOW AND HOW IT WILL GROW THIS YEAR.

The FamilySearch wiki at https://wiki.familysearch.org is a free website designed to allow the genealogical community to provide advice on the best strategies and records to use in finding ancestors. The site is free to everyone, but you must register to add or edit information.

This community authoring approach enables the creation of objective advice, rapid revision and translation, and coverage of more places worldwide. In 2009 contributors will be working together on a series of "barn raisings" -- short, intensive community efforts to provide information regarding the best sources, methodologies, and strategies for doing genealogical research in a specific location such as a state in the U.S. or a county in England.

This talk will preview what the barn raisings are and show some quick and easy ways you can contribute to this great worldwide project. Everyone is invited to log onto the Wiki and sample the types of information you can find there.

Michael Ritchey is a former Family History Center Director in Provo, Ward Family History Consultant, and professional genealogist. He has worked for the Family History Department of the LDS Church since 2000 as a U.S. Reference Consultant at the Family History Library, as manager of the Research Support team, and most recently, as community and content coordinator of FamilySearch wiki on the Community Services team.

Following the main presentation there will be several classes taught concerning technology and family history. As usual, there will be something for everyone at all levels of expertise. The classes currently scheduled for this meeting are: (1) Clearing Names for the Temple in 2009, by Duane Dudley; (2) Keeping Your PC Healthy, by Jerry Castillo; (3) Q&A on the Family Search Wiki, by Michael Ritchey; (4) Video of November's Main Presentation on WorldConnect at RootsWeb, by Gerhard Ruf; (5) Ancestral Quest 12.1, by Paul Johnson; (6) RootsMagic 3, by Bruce Buzbee; and (7) Legacy 7, by Dean Bennett.

All meetings of the Users Group are open to the public whether members of the Group or not.

The Users Group has the goal of helping individuals use technology to further their family history and there are usually 100-125 attending the monthly meetings on the second Saturdays.

Several of the officers, including Gerhard Ruf, President; Don Snow, 1st VP; Brian Cooper, 2nd VP; Beth Ann Wiseman, PAFology Editor; Kay Baker and Gerry Eliason working with finances and membership; and Bruce Merrill, Lynne Shumway, and Marie Andersen, working with the DVD and Video Library, will all be there. They will help with membership, answer questions, distribute the current issue of the monthly newsletter PAFology, and check out DVD's and videos of past presentations and classes to members of the group.

Information about the Users Group, main presentations, classes, and class notes are available on the Group's website http://uvpafug.org and the press releases are at http://blog.uvpafug.org/.

For further information contact President Gerhard Ruf at pres@uvpafug.org (801-225-6106), VP1 Don Snow at snowd@math.byu.edu, or VP2 Brian Cooper at vp2@uvpafug.org.
Don Snow, 1st Vice President of Utah Valley PAF Users Group

Donald R. Snow, recently returned from the England London Mission, London Family History CentreRetired Professor of Mathematics, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah snowd@math.byu.edu

Some blogs of note

DearREADERS,
As the final Assignment #3 report for my ProGen2 Study Group this month, Ol' Myrt is hereby pointing readers to other blogs of note that she follows. Though I cannot possibly list the 350+ blogs I follow regularly, here are some suggestions for your perusal:

Kevin Purdy's Playing Board Games Boosts Important Skills posted at LifeHacker.com makes Ol' Myrt here feel more comfortable with the time spent on Facebook playing WordScraper. LifeHacker.com has all sorts of advice about doing things on either a Windows or Mac, using an iPod or cell phone, etc. Get Free Logos at LogoInstant is another recent offering.

In that same not-really-genealogy-but-techie genre, offerings from the ZDNet.com blogs prove a bit more complex, but just as useful. This last week I learned about Outsourcing Predictions for 2009, Some minor criticisms of the Windows 7 beta, and pondered the question Will second patent medicine era end in 2009?.

Ol' Myrt always refers to Dick Eastman, whenever she has a techie genealogy issue to figure out. This is not to play down individual product blogs such as Geoff Rasmussen authors Legacy's Blog and recently released A Year in Review - Legacy Family Tree in 2008. Chart Chick of GenerationMaps.com has a marvelous Sharing Your Family History Series. Bruce Buzbee's RootsMagic Blog where he announces the last of the recent "unwrapped" series RootsMagic 4 Unwrapped - RootsMagic To Go. This must mean version 4 is close at hand.

And speaking of techie, I love Blaine Bettinger's blog including the recent Genetic Genealogy Links for December 12 2008 which he some how managed to compile during the middle of his law school studies. There are always cool techie software things reported at Jean-Yves Baxter's Genealogy Blog at GeneaNet most recently Back up your Data.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

Podcasts:DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2008 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

ProGen2 - Assignment #3 Genealogy Columns/Blogs


DearREADERS,
As part of my continuing education as a genealogist, Ol’ Myrt here has joined what is known as the ProGen2 Study Group. This group of like-minded genealogy professional (some writers, some researchers) will work a total of 18 months together, reading assignments from Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers and Librarians edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills. We then are asked to write a report centering on the reading assignment, and follow this up with a monthly online chat to “discuss” via a real-time typed conversation the subject we’ve studied this past month.

Our assignment for the third month was to read Chapter 19, pp. 381-388 titled “Genealogy Columns” by Regina Hines Ellison, CG. We were then to report on our own columns or blogs. This is most of the text of my written assignment:

One concept brought out in the ProGen chapter was that a good genealogy column should settle on a particular column type.

DearMYRTLE uses a variety of column types (as defined in this chapter of ProGen), depending on what's happening in the world of genealogy. So you'll find:

ETHNIC COLUMNS: These typically come into play when another organization asks Ol' Myrt to announce one of their upcoming events. Blog entries along this line lately include:

GENERAL INTEREST COLUMNS:

HOW-TO COLUMNS

LOCAL HISTORY COLUMNS

New Genealogy Guides for England and Scotland
  • Swedish Emigration Institute threatened
  • QUESTIONS & ANSWERS COLUMNS
    This was the basis for the DearMYRTLE column, initially. Something akin to the "DearAbby" format, all questions and answers.

    QUERY COLUMNS
    Occasionally, Ol' Myrt will respond to a reader's question, and other questions remain that are subsequently answered by another DearMYRTLE reader. This happened most recently in a series about the use of Google Patent Search.

    #1 The initial blog entry titled "Patent search at Google provides new ancestral locality" was based in a research report from a friend of Myrt's in Second Life.

    #2 A Reader reports on following the advice in the column in "READER'S
    FEEDBACK: Google Patent Search
    ". Myrt gave additional research ideas to flesh out the reader's understanding of her ancestor.

    #3 Another reader answers Myrt's query about the role of witnesses on a patent in "Role of patent witnesses".

    MAINTAINING MOMENTUM has never been a problem -- interference of real life has however, caused me to podcast sporadically and blog semi-regularly. Letting my readers know about some aspects of my personal life was a conscious decision. Readers have been most understanding when I was, for instance, been swamped caring for my Dad and step-mother in the last years of their lives. But, Ol’ Myrt here wakes up with two or three ideas to blog about. Just wish I could do it all verbally, and not have to take the time to type things up in a blog.

    When I first started writing DearMYRTLE in 1995, the choice was to write daily or weekly. I made a list of 365 topics I could discuss in a daily column and chose to write daily. Howver, after the first month, there were enough reader replies that I never had to use that list again.

    WHERE OL' MYRT HERE NEEDS HELP is with editing her blog entries. One must make enough money to support oneself AND pay someone to edit on a quick turn-around basis. That just isn't in the cards for me at the moment. The BEAUTY of blogging is that it costs tons less than web sites do to produce. Joe the plumber can do it.

    Apparently my readers and podcast listeners have basically forgiven my typos and occasional errors of grammar. Either that, or they’ve given up!

    Happy family tree climbing!
    Myrt :)
    DearMYRTLE,
    Your friend in genealogy.
    Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

    Blogs:
    http://blog.dearmyrtle.com
    http://blog.teachgenealogy.com

    Podcasts:DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
    http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com

    Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
    http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

    DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
    http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373

    © 2008 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

    This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

    2009: Be ALL that you can be


    DearREADERS,
    Ol’ Myrt here has been busy planning blog entries and books for publication in 2009. The biggest thing I plan to do personally is:

    FINALLY GET ORGANIZED!!

    Years ago, I published “DearMYRTLE’s Monthly Organization Checklists” when writing this column exclusively for AOL's Genealogy Forum. Together we tackled the overwhelming job in weekly increments. Ol' Myrt here has revised the checklists several times since 1995. Eventually I took them off the web and sold them in booklet fomat.

    NOW, I’ve completely revised the checklists, and will post the January 2009 Finally Get Organized! Checklist tomorrow.


    WHY ME?
    Since I am combining THREE households of my research (my dad’s research, stuff I accumulated when at my dads, and my Florida research notebooks) this is a perfect time for me to commit to FINALLY GETTING ORGANIZED.

    Together we can overcome all – and be all that we can be as “ORGANIZED GENEALOGISTS”. No giggling now!

    Happy family tree climbing!
    Myrt :)
    DearMYRTLE,
    Your friend in genealogy.
    Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

    Blogs:
    http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/
    http://blog.teachgenealogy.com/

    Podcasts:DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
    http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com/

    Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
    http://fhexpos.libsyn.com/

    DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
    http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
    © 2008 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

    This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

    Variety of Questions - Part 3

    A Variety of Questions - Part 1

    RE: A Variety of Questions - Part 2

    DearROGER,
    You wrote
    I know that some of the original records of my family were destroyed in places like different states due to fires, like the Great Earthquake & Fire of SF, CA in 1905, or the US Federal Census of 1890, or home fires where important correspondence and other documentation were stored from the 1880s onward. How do I recreate these wheels from just a scrap of a letter from 1900 to find the records that were gathered and lost in the fire?"

    Let us not assume we will be able to accumulate the same number and type of documents to prove each generation's relationship to the prior generation. As you say, some records have been destroyed.

    So we won't be able to merely collect a birth, marriage and death certificate for each person on our family tree. We'll have to expand our understanding of family relationships using church, census, and other records.

    Sometimes a document will provide direct evidence stating that so-and so is the father of your known ancestor.

    Other times you are lucky if a document provides indirect evidence.

    An example of indirect evidence would be where in "document A" man states his son is so-and-so, AND in "document B" that child has stated he is a sibling of your known ancestor. This indirect evidence might lead you to conclude that your ancestor is possibly the child of the man in "document A". Of course, with step-parents, early deaths of mothers, and unofficial adoptions; other documents may prove that theory to be inaccurate. However, as you build your case, compiling as much direct, first-hand information as possible, you will merely summarize your argument in notes for that individual. This leaves an audit trail for you to follow when you pick up the scent in future research.

    For more help on analyzing your stack of documents, be sure to print out Mark Tucker's Genealogy Research Process map found at ThinkGenealogy.com. Just click on the image below, and you'll be taken to the website.

    Click to view and print out Mark Tucker's Genealogy Research Process map.


    Mark devised this map from extensive review of the Board for Certification of Genealogists' The Genealogical Proof Standard [discussed in yesterday's blog entry] "and the many works of Elizabeth Shown Mills into a single visualization." Ol' Myrt here interviewed Mark on my 4 March 2008 podcast. This was a lengthy interview, and you'll want to listen. (You don't need an iPod to listen, just turn on those computer speakers and click the play button on the radio graphic.)

    Now for some specific assistance regarding the loss of all but 6% of the 1890 US Federal Census, consider wherever your ancestor lived that there may be a Veteran's schedule listing him or his widow, that there may be state and/or territorial census taken on the "off" years. In the case of California, however, you might not be as fortunate.

    Consider, how did your ancestors arrive in California. Perhaps Ancestry's California Passenger and Crew Lists, 1893-1957 will be useful? Bet you didn't think to also view California Voter Registrations, 1900-1968 , and I just noticed Ancestry has something on California City Directories.

    Look for ancestors by name in city directories (also perhaps on microfilm) which go back as far as the early 1800s in some places. The listing will include address and employer. I've had a case where in the next directory, the wife is listed as "wd. of Charles" at the same address where Charles resided the previous year. That gives a big clue about his death during the previous year. FamilySearch.org's

    California Research Outline
    explains: Directories of heads of households were published for major cities of California. The Family History Library [FHL], for example, has:

    View the films and fiche by borrowing a copy through your local Family History Center. Books must remain in the FHL. Check www.FamilySearch.org for the location of the centers closest to you.

    FOR FURTHER READING

    Happy family tree climbing!
    Myrt :)
    DearMYRTLE,
    Your friend in genealogy.
    Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

    Blogs:
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
    http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

    Podcasts:
    DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour

    http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

    Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
    http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

    DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
    http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373

    © 2008 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.
    This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

    Tuesday, December 30, 2008

    Variety of Questions - Part 2

    RE: A Variety of Questions - Part 1

    DearROGER,
    You wrote “I need to figure out how to find ancestry in places like PA
    [Pennsylvania] for my great-great-grandfather & great-great-grandmother to determine who his parents were, where in Ireland he came from or when he immigrated to America and what my great-great grandmother's maiden name was, and where they married, had their first two children, etc..”

    Your challenge is the same as every other researcher facing a “new” locality of research. It is incumbent upon each of us to learn about:

    Resources said to have survived for the locality of interest. To find out what has survived from the time period your ancestor lived in the place, consider the local town, county and state archives & libraries, local and regional genealogical societies, local and regional historical societies, WPA inventories of local courthouses, http://www.usgenweb.com/, FamilySearch's Pennsylvania Research Outline, and such.

    NOTE you won't be looking in person at the records in these distant facilities, since real life requires us to do things like eat, sleep, pay our mortgages, work and such. But...

    You will first exhaust all possibilities of online scanned images of original documents and indexes to save time when onsite research must be done by you or a researcher you hire. This would include checking the following resources at
    least monthly in case anything new has been added:

    http://www.ancestry.com/

    http://www.familysearch.org/ (in particular the Family History Library Catalog of microfilm and microfiche to be ordered throughh yourlocal Family History Center.)

    http://pilot.familysearch.org/

    http://www.footnote.com/ (has free access to the published Pennsylvania Archives, particularly good for the colonial time period, every word searchable and such!)

    http://www.google.com/ Google Search, Google Books, etc.

    When you "get" to a different locality, check to see if FamilySearch has another research outline, and if either http://www.worldgenweb.org/ or http://www.usgenweb.com/ has suggestions for the new locality.

    Your list of relevant websites will expand as your ancestor's place of residence changes in your research.

    FOR FURTHER A Bibliography of American County HistoriesREADING

    See P. William Filby’s Bibliography of American County Histories. If you go to the publisher's website, you'll find a search box for the Google Book version of the publication. The publisher explains the title was "compiled for use by historians and genealogists, A Bibliography of American County Histories provides a state-by-state listing of all published county histories of any significance, giving information concerning title, author, and place and date of publication, as well as details of editions, reprints, and indexes, so the reader can learn what is available almost at a glance."

    Happy family tree climbing!
    Myrt :)
    DearMYRTLE,
    Your friend in genealogy.
    Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

    Blogs:
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
    http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

    Podcasts:
    DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour

    http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

    Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
    http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

    DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
    http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373

    © 2008 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

    This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
    . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

    Monday, December 29, 2008

    Variety of Questions - Part 1

    From: Roger rlhenry1@yahoo.com
    DearMYRTLE,
    I am a beginning genealogy researcher trying to "reinvent the genealogy wheel of my entire family from Europe to America.

    At this point, I have over 1500 names in the Master Family Tree (I'm using Family Tree Maker V. 16) and know that this is just under half of what probably is the total number of people and generations in my branches of the tree.

    I've found mentioned in part of my family's notes that we go back on my mother's side to Brittany, France in 1249, but am missing the names of the next 17-18 generations from then to about the late 16th Century in France to find those three hundred years of people in my mother's lineage.

    When I came across your articles a few minutes ago looking up how to convert a PAF file to a PDF, or Gedcom file format, that is how I discovered your beginning genealogy articles which look great and I hope that I will be able to further my researching my family. […] Some of these lessons I need to figure out how to find ancestry in places like PA [Pennsylvania] for my ggreat-great-grandfather & great-great-grandmother to determine who his parents were, where in Ireland he came from or when he immigrated to America and what my great-great grandmother's maiden name was, and where they married, had their first two children, etc..

    I also have Qs about how to find records in different lands whether for Ireland, Scotland, England, France, Germany, Switzerland, and perhaps other countries as well once I clear up all the conundrums I'm still experiencing in tracing all the branches of my family in America.

    Last but not least, I know that some of the original records of my family were destroyed in places like different states due to fires, like the Great Earthquake & Fire of SF, CA in 1905, or the US Federal Census of 1890, or home fires where important correspondence and other documentation were stored from the 1880s onward. How do I recreate these wheels from just a scrap of a letter from 1900 to find the records that were gathered and lost in the fire?

    I've hired genealogy researchers in different states to help me find lineage information on spouses of the family that cousins of mine are connected to (like in KY, IN, etc., and have contacted the KY Historical Society as well as the state archives and library area of the government to find records for relatives records, bible records, etc., there, not to mention county libraries too, to see if they have any information on these generations from 1780 to 1862, etc..

    In any case, these are just some of the many things that I'm struggling with in not only finding records, but also in documenting my research.

    I'm also not clear on what is a definitive source record vs. what I'm finding written up in history books on my ancestors in different states' history books and how to use these stories of my ancestors. Please let me know if you can help me with my general "feeling overwhelmed" situation.

    DearROGER,
    Ol’ Myrt here is remiss in not having answered your questions earlier. There is no need to feel overwhelmed as it only make us less able to acquire and process information. Genealogists are constantly learning and honing their craft, as more reliable resources are coming to light each
    week.
    Genealogical Proof Standard: Building a Solid Case, 2nd Edition

    You wrote “I've found mentioned in part of my family's notes that we go back on my mother's side to Brittany, France in 1249, but am missing the names of the next 17-18 generations from then to about the late 16th Century in France to find those three hundred years of people in my mother's lineage.”

    You’ve apparently looked some medieval lineage book (similar to Burke’s Peerage in Great Britain) for the same name as found in your mother’s line that you’ve traced back to the late 1500s. This is a troublesome method of research.

    We simply MUST start with your mother, and work backward through the surviving documents at government and church archives to establish her lineage following the Genealogical Proof Standard. The puzzle is too overwhelming from a numbers point of view if you attempt to reverse the process, and work through each child of the circa 1249 individual, then trace each of the descendants through the 17-18 generations until you stumble across your proven ancestor in the late 1500s.

    Observing this basic genealogical research principle - start with yourself and work
    backwards, should reduce your stress level considerably.


    FOR FURTHER READING
    • Board for Certification of Genealogists. "Genealogical Proof Standard". (A summary in web format.)
    • Rose, Christina. Genealogical Proof Standard: Building a Solid Case, 2nd Edition. From HeritageBooks.com we read: "Preponderance of evidence" has been abandoned by the genealogical field, and "Genealogical Proof Standard" substituted. This booklet explains the changes and clearly sets out what the Genealogical Proof Standard is, and how to apply it to research. Written in simple terms, this updated and enlarged 2nd edition includes a discussion of the elements of building a case and weighing the evidence under present-day standards. 2005, 5½x8½, 58 pp. $8.95. ISBN: 092962615X.

    Happy family tree climbing!
    Myrt :)
    DearMYRTLE,
    Your friend in genealogy.
    Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

    Blogs:
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
    http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

    Podcasts:
    DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour

    http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

    Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
    http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

    DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
    http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373

    © 2008 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

    This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

    Call for Nominations Deadline Extended -- Genealogical Publishing Company Award

    NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following has been posted here and there on genealogy mailing lists by our friends at Genealogical.com. Please address all inquiries to mkmannix@gmail.com.

    Call for Nominations Deadline Extended -- Genealogical Publishing Company Award

    The Genealogical Publishing Company Award Committee, History Section, Reference and User Services Association of the American Library Association continues to seek nominations for the 2009 award recipient. The award, established in 1992, consists of $1,500 cash, with a citation, to a librarian, library, or publisher who has achieved excellence in historical reference and research librarianship.

    Sponsored by Genealogical Publishing Company, a major distributor of genealogical works, this award is intended as a career achievement award for persons who have made ongoing contributions to history librarianship over many years and\or who have been active in the History Section of ALA. Nominees must presently be a member of the RUSA History Section.

    The nominations will be evaluated for exceptional accomplishment in such fields as bibliography, book reviewing, indexing, professional association leadership, programs, and training. The list of previous winners can be viewed at
    http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/rusa/awards/genealogicalpublishing/index.cfm.

    To nominate an individual, send a letter following the format below, detailing the individual's accomplishments and service to the field. The Committee understands that not all fields may be relevant for all nominees. Current membership in RUSA and the History Section is required. Nominations much be received by January 23, 2009. Nominations are to be sent, faxed, or e-mailed to:

    Mary Mannix
    C. Burr Artz Public Library
    110 E. Patrick Street
    Frederick, MD 21701
    301-924-2054 (fax)
    mkmannix@gmail.com

    This format may be cut and pasted or downloaded. Accompanying materials are welcomed. Please keep in mind that as well known as the nominee may be, not everyone on the panel may be familiar with their work. Nominations will remain active for two years. Individuals nominated this year who do not receive the award will automatically be reconsidered for the 2010 award.

    Tuesday, December 23, 2008

    Are we forgetting to buy tomatoes?

    NOTE from DearMYRTLE: Due to popular demand, Myrt grants the reprint of this copyrighted column in local and regional genealogy society newsletters in paper format, provided it includes the contact and copyright info below her signature.


    DearREADERS,
    If the milk in our refrigerator has gone beyond it’s expiration date, we throw it out and buy more.

    So why do people look at a genealogy website once and never return?

    When the bag of lettuce and a few tomatoes have out-lived their freshness in our vegetable bins, we don’t quit eating salads. We just pick up more veggies the next time we go to the grocery store.

    Ol’ Myrt here just cannot understand why many family historians don’t likewise -- revisiting the “genealogy store” for fresh info about ancestors.

    WHAT IS THE GENEALOGY STORE?
    Rather than any particular website, Myrt’s definition of the “genealogy store” is that it is a group of records providing clues about family relationships.

    The resource may or may not include a fee to view. Websites and some private libraries require a fee to “enter”. Other records may be available on microfilm for a small “rental” fee at your local LDS Family History Center.

    Items on the “store” shelves include but are not limited to:

    • Printed family histories
    • Printed local histories
    • Family bibles
    • Family letters
    • Family photos
    • Family heirlooms
    • Biographies
    • Courthouse records
    • Church records
    • Census records
    • Inventory of records in a collection
    • Funeral cards
    • Land records
    • Manuscript collections
    • Military records
    • Naturalization records
    • Newspapers
    • Passenger records
    • Tax records
    • Vital records

    WHERE IS THE GENEALOGY STORE?

    • National archives
    • National libraries
    • Regional archives
    • State and provincial archives
    • Online genealogy database sites (Ancestry.com, FamilySearch.org, FindMyPast.com, FreeBMD.com, Footnote.com, GenealogyBank, Genline.com, Legacy.com, ScotlandsPeople.gov.uk, etc.)
    • Genealogy “how-to” blogs, columns and articles
    • Google Alerts (set them up for unusual family names, keyword, etc.)
    • Google Books
    • Google Search
    • Family History Centers (4,500+ throughout the world with access to microfilm using the Family History Library Catalog http://www.familysearch.org/ .)
    • Libraries – public (New York Public, Dallas Public, Library of Congress to name but three.)
    • Libraries – private (Family History Library, DAR Library, New England Historical Genealogical Society to name but three.)
    • Mailing lists
    • Message boards
    • Genealogy Podcasts
    • USGenWeb
    • WorldGenWeb

    WHY VISIT THE GENEALOGY STORE MORE THAN ONCE?
    I have friends in Second Life who say they posted messages on RootsWeb mailing lists a few years ago. Sad, but true. Sometimes you have to wait for a fish to bite, but there ARE ways of sweetening the pot. And it is necessary to play with the line to attract attention. (That perhaps translates to revisiting the post, and adding additional info.)

    Well, just how long can we go without fresh veggies?

    REMEMBER

    Additional ancient documents (over 50 years old) are coming to light every week, both online and off-line.

    More microfilm and digital images are being gathered each day.

    Millions of names are being indexed at FamilySearchIndexing.org each month.

    Ol' Myrt's best advice? BUY FRESH TOMATOES EVERY WEEK.

    Happy family tree climbing!
    Myrt :)
    DearMYRTLE,
    Your friend in genealogy.
    Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

    Blogs:
    http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/
    http://blog.teachgenealogy.com/

    Podcasts:
    DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
    http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com/

    Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
    http://fhexpos.libsyn.com/

    DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
    http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
    © 2008 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

    This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

    If there are phonies now, what about then?

    DearREADERS,
    In his GenealogyBank Blog, Tomas Jay Kemp responded to today's Chicago Tribune article by Steve Mills titled "Hunt is on for Phony POWs". “Mary and Chuck Schantag of the P.O.W. Network say they have exposed close to 1,900 people who have falsely claimed to be prisoners of war and another 2,000 men who falsely claimed they served in elite units.” Tom points us to over a million GenealogyBank.com old newspaper articles discussing POWs.

    If there are such phonies now, what about long ago – at the times when our ancestors walked the earth?

    Experienced researchers will tell us that biographical info published in county histories MUST be taken with a grain of salt, in that the subjects PAID for their entries, and the facts were not verified by the publishers. In many cases, the stories were - er, um - shall we say "embellished" a bit?

    All “secondary” sources of info should be checked and verified with “primary” documents from originating sources.

    For instance, if a man’s bio states he served during the Revolutionary War, then muster rolls, service records, pension files and such should be thoroughly investigated. Though the lack of a pension file doesn’t mean a fellow didn’t serve, it just might mean he didn’t live long enough to receive a pension.

    It is common to have family stories handed down about military service, but often there is confusion and misinterpretation. Revolutionary War service might actually have been Civil War service.

    THE GENEALOGICAL PROOF STANDARD
    In each case, we’re to compare all related record groups with the ancestral story to determine the likelihood of the story having a basis in fact.

    Thank heavens Mary and Chuck Schantag are sorting through the 20th and 21st century mess of alleged POWs and elite service unit membership to cull out some of the phony baloneys.

    We need to be just as careful in our genealogical research.

    FOR FURTHER READING
    Board for Certification of Genealogists’ Genealogical Proof Standard (online listing).

    Elizabeth Shown Mills’ BCG Genealogical Standards Manual (a valuable resource book.)

    Happy family tree climbing!
    Myrt :)
    DearMYRTLE,
    Your friend in genealogy.
    Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

    Blogs:
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
    http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

    Podcasts:
    DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
    http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

    Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
    http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

    DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
    http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
    © 2008 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

    This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

    NARA: Black History Month Feb 2009

    NOTE from DearMYRTLE: Although dated eysterday, the following was just received from our friends at the National Archives (US). Please address all inquiries to public.program@nara.gov.



    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    December 22, 2008



    THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES CELEBRATES BLACK HISTORY MONTH IN FEBRUARY

    Washington, DC . . . The National Archives will celebrate Black History Month in February with a special showing of the Emancipation Proclamation, an American Conversation with Henry Louis Gates, book talks, and films. These programs are free and open to the public. They will be held at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC, located on Constitution Ave. between 7th and 9th Streets, NW, Washington, DC.

    February 12-16, 2009

    Featured Document Display: The Emancipation Proclamation
    Thursday, February 12 through Monday, February 16, 2009 National Archives East Rotunda Gallery In celebration of the 200th anniversary of Lincoln's birth and the Presidents' Day holiday, the National Archives will display the original Emancipation Proclamation signed by President Lincoln. The special display of the Emancipation Proclamation is free and open to the public.

    Special hours: Open extended hours until 6:30 p.m. on February 14-16 for viewing of the Emancipation Proclamation. Last admission is 30 minutes prior to closing.

    Thursday, February 5, at 7 p.m.
    An American Conversation with Henry Louis Gates

    William G. McGowan Theater
    The National Archives welcomes Harvard professor and renowned author, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., to discuss African American genealogy. Lonnie Bunch, Director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, will also join the discussion. While researching his own family history, Professor Gates discovered the fascinating histories of other prominent African Americans, resulting in his new book, In Search of Our Roots: How 19 Extraordinary African Americans Reclaimed Their Past. A book signing will follow the program.
    The two-part PBS documentary, African American Lives, upon which In Search of Our Roots is based, will be screened in the William G. McGowan Theater on February 6 and 13 at noon.

    Friday, February 6, and Friday, February 13, at noon
    Film: African American Lives

    William G. McGowan Theater
    Hosted and narrated by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of the Humanities and chair of African and African American Studies at Harvard University, African American Lives, an unprecedented four-part PBS series, takes Alex Haley's Roots saga to a new level through moving stories of personal discovery. Using genealogy, oral history, family stories and DNA analysis to trace lineage through American history and back to Africa, the series provides a life-changing journey for a diverse group of highly accomplished African Americans: Dr. Ben Carson, Whoopi Goldberg, Bishop T. D. Jakes, Dr. Mae Jemison, Quincy Jones, Dr. Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Chris Tucker and Oprah Winfrey. Each day's program will run 120 minutes.

    Wednesday, February 11, at noon
    Book talk: Becton:
    Autobiography of a Soldier and Public Servant Noon
    Jefferson Room

    Lt. General, Julius W. Becton, Jr., discusses his memoir, Becton: Autobiography of a Soldier and Public Servant. Julius Becton fought for his country in three wars, overcame many obstacles and reached the unprecedented rank of three-star general. Later, he was both the innovative head of FEMA and a university president. A book signing will follow the program.

    Wednesday, February 25, at noon
    Book talk: Death or Liberty: African Americans and Revolutionary America

    Jefferson Room
    In Death or Liberty, Douglas R. Egerton offers a sweeping chronicle of African American history stretching from Britain's 1763 victory in the Seven Years' War to the election of slaveholder Thomas Jefferson as President in 1800. Egerton helps to recapture the drama of slaves, freed blacks, and white reformers fighting to make the young nation fulfill its republican slogans while recalling compelling portraits of forgotten figures. A book signing will follow the program.


    The National Archives is fully accessible. To request an accommodation (e.g., sign language interpreter) for a public program, please email public.program@nara.gov or call (202) 357-5000 at least two weeks prior to the event. To verify the date and times of the programs, see the

    NARA: Feb 2009 genealogy programs/classes

    NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was just received from our friends at the National Archives (US). Please address all inquiries to Public.Affairs@nara.gov.

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    December 23, 2008

    Special Programs Highlight National Archives Records in February 2009

    Washington, DC. . . In February, the National Archives will feature a series of programs highlighting records from its holdings. All programs are free and open to the public and will be held in the National Archives Building in Washington, DC. Please note that some of these programs will be repeated at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland.

    Visitors to all programs in the National Archives Building Research Center (Room G-24) should use the Pennsylvania Avenue entrance, between 7th and 9th Streets, NW. The National Archives at College Park, MD is located at 8601 Adelphi Road. For directions to both locations, see: http://www.archives.gov/dc-metro.

    Tuesday, February 3, at 11 a.m.
    Declassifying Secrets: Opening Classified Records for Public Disclosure

    Room G-24, Research Center (Enter on Pennsylvania Avenue) Archivist Neil Carmichael will discuss the declassification process at the National Archives, past executive orders, present initiatives, and the future of declassification in the executive branch. (This lecture will be repeated at the National Archives at College Park, MD, in the auditorium, on Thursday, February 5, at 11 a.m.).

    Wednesday, February 4, at 11 a.m.
    Introduction to Genealogy

    Room G-24, Research Center (Enter on Pennsylvania Avenue) Archives staff will present a lecture on basic genealogical research in Federal records. This lecture occurs on select Saturdays and the first Wednesday of the month. (The next lecture will take place on Wednesday, March 4.)

    Tuesday, February 10, at 11 a.m.
    Discovering Lincoln in the Records

    Room G-24, Research Center (Enter on Pennsylvania Avenue) Archivist Trevor Plante will discuss Lincoln records held at the National Archives in the Washington, DC, area. His talk will include an overview of documents in Federal custody written to and from Abraham Lincoln as well as several that bear his signature. Digitized copies of documents that show the President saving soldiers from the death penalty and Lincoln assassination records will also be on view. (This lecture will be repeated at the National Archives at College Park, MD, in the auditorium, on Thursday, February 12 at 11 a.m.).

    Tuesday, February 17, at 11 a.m. and noon From the Records Book Group and Lecture Room G-24, Research Center (Enter on Pennsylvania Avenue) Following a related presentation at 11 a.m., the From the Records Book Group will discuss The Pentagon: A History-The Untold Story of the Wartime Race to Build the Pentagon-and to Restore It Sixty years Later by Steve Vogel. Please check the Archives Shop (202-357-5271) for book availability and a special discount for book group participants. The March book selection will be The Harp and the Eagle: Irish-American Volunteers and the Union Army, 1861-1865 by Susannah Bruce.

    Wednesday, February 18, at 11 a.m.
    Passport Applications, 1795-1925

    Room G-24, Research Center (Enter on Pennsylvania Avenue) Archives Specialists Rebecca Sharp and Katherine Vollen will discuss how to locate passport applications and how these records can enhance your genealogical research. (This lecture will be repeated at the National Archives at College Park, MD, in the auditorium, on Thursday, February 19, at 11 a.m.).

    Saturday, February 21, at 10 a.m.
    Introduction to Genealogy

    Room G-24, Research Center (Enter on Pennsylvania Avenue) Archives staff will present a lecture on basic genealogical research in Federal records. This lecture occurs on select Saturdays and the first Wednesday of the month. (The next weekend lecture will take place on Saturday, March 21.)

    Saturday, February 21, noon-4 p.m.
    "Help! I'm Stuck"

    Room G-24, Research Center (Enter on Pennsylvania Avenue) On select Saturday afternoons, an archivist with extensive experience in genealogy and the records of the National Archives will be available to assist with your research questions. Please sign up for a 20-minute appointment at the Research Center. (The next opportunity will be on Saturday, March 21.)

    Tuesday, February 24, at 11 a.m.
    Records of the New Deal

    Room G-24, Research Center (Enter on Pennsylvania Avenue) Archives Genealogy Specialist John Deeben will examine the central files of the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (1933-1936) and demonstrate how the records provide personal and family information about individuals within the context of their experiences during the Great Depression. (This lecture will be repeated at the National Archives at College Park, MD, in the auditorium, on Thursday, February 26, at 11 a.m.).

    Monday, December 22, 2008

    ACROSS MY DESK: 22 Dec 2009

    DearREADERS,
    With a plethora of office parties, neighborhood get-togethers, family dinners and such, our time with LIVING RELATIVES should take precedence over our ancestral quests at this time of year. Genealogy DOES bring living family together.

    During a Second Life voice chat, several participants shared the link to the JewishWorldReview.com article Lifetime, no see, featuring a reunion of two adopted-out octogenarian brothers who live a few blocks from each other and never knew the other existed.

    Another Second Life voice chat brought the news of Two sides of the Ocean about a trip to the ancestral homeland – something we’d all like to try.

    Happy Chanukah to friends including Schelly Talalay Dardashti who blogged that the Festival of Lights begins Sunday. “Jews around the world will celebrate the first night of Chanukah on Sunday evening, December 21. This eight-day holiday - also known as the Festival of Lights - with its bright candles reminds us of events that took place more than 2,300 years ago in the ancient land of Judea, now Israel.”

    So Schelly, as your family was gathering to celebrate, I, too, had gathered my family near, to celebrate our Christmas Dinner a few days early. Most of my immediate family are going to the in-laws for Christmas this year.

    How blessed we are to have strong traditions in our families. What a joy to share our faith and tradition with the younger generation. Isn’t that one of our main jobs as the family historians in the family?

    Here are some other tidbits for your review:
    1. Got SNOW? Well, footnoteMaven has written about it, others have “Facebooked” about it. Now Tom Kemp, our friend at GenealogyBank.com chimes in with his posting about an old newspaper entry. See Did you get snow? Bet it was nothing like the snow of 1898.
    2. Ready for a trip? Jean-Yves Baxter reports Norwegian TV Producers Seek Norwegian-Americans. Oh, that’s right – Norway has a lot of snow, too.
    3. With all the hype about the switch to digital television broadcasting in February 2009, here is a neat tip from our friends at LifeHacker.com with Gina Trapinni’s Ditch Satellite TV for Online Alternatives and Save. You know you want a better computer, and you also need to justify the hi-speed connection for viewing graphic-intensive pages at Ancestry, Footnote, GenealogyBank, and FamilySearch. Diversify by adding TV to your computer’s capabilities and manage to save $93 monthly to boot.
    4. What about Identifying an Unknown Parent Using Genetic Genealogy? Thanks for your thoughts, Blaine Bettinger.
    5. See our favorite NBC Today show hosts (including former host Katie Couric) with Bennett Greenspan, of Family Tree DNA and Dr. Spencer Wells in a YouTube.com video about the genographic project. They call it “deep ancestry.”
    6. For those who are into graphics ala television’s favorite game show – Concentration, check out Mark Tucker’s ThinkGenealogy Rebus #1.
    7. Ol’ Myrt thinks there are only about 10 of you out there that don’t subscribe to the Plus Edition of Eastman’s Online Genealogy News. Dick Eastman has provided free access to his 15 Dec Plus Edition. This is your chance for the ten of you to see what you’ve been missing. So sign up, already!
    8. If you are already Plus Edition subscriber, you already know the details of Dick’s article titled Help! Someone is publishing My Family’s Information!
    9. Former WVR President, David Differth just created Genealogy Metrics, a website to track busy genealogy websites. DearMYRTLE is listed in the “blog” category, although the stats refer only to my website, which has only pre-2007 articles posted. This prompts me to commit to posting everything in both my blog (for ease of distribution) and my website (for archiving & searching) starting in 2009. If I am really organized, I’ll cross-post the last two years of blog entries in the archive at my website. My readers report it is much easier to search for old articles at my site than at my blog (powered by Blogger.com).
    10. RootsTelevision will be commercial free for a while. That will make it easier for those with slower internet connections to wade in to viewing the actual genealogy content.
    11. Thanks to DJPoint for mentioning Ol’ Myrt here among other genea-bloggers in the creative poem ‘Twas just days before Christmas – clearly a fun take on the Night Before Christmas.
    12. If you’d like to know more about the real “Night Before Christmas” see this offering from the Library of Congress’ American Memory Project: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/dec24.html .
    13. If you receive a copy of Legacy Family Tree 7 for Christmas, be sure to read the blog entry describing Legacy 7 Videos – Download to CD. The videos are free, and Geoff explains “Until now, these videos were only available to view from our web site, which meant that you had to be online to watch them."
    14. Genealogy podcasting is really the way to go, if you'd like to extend your genealogy learning experience beyond the keyboard. Try out your new iPod (or other .mp3 player) and subscribe to DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour genealogy podcast, Lisa Louise Cooke’s Genealogy Gems, Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts (with host DearMYRTLE), The Genealogy Guys George Morgan and Drew Smith, and Irish Roots Cafe. The latter podcast reports “Be sure to check out our new podcast provider page on iTunes ! This is a special page that lists all 5 of our podcasts. Click on any one of our podcasts there, take a listen, and if you can, go ahead and leave us feedback on iTunes.” You may also listen with a free copy of iTunes on your computer – just turn up those speakers.
    15. More from Lisa Louise Cook: She posted a good item about New Languages at Google Translate. They’ve probably got your ancestral language covered.
    16. How do you feel about the building of a Wal-Mart near the Wilderness Battlefield? From the website for National Trust for Historic Preservation:“More than 2,700 acres of the battlefield are preserved as part of the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, a key destination along the newly designated Journey Through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area. There are many potential sites for Wal-Mart, but only one Wilderness Battlefield.” You may wish to register your feeling by going to: go to: http://www.civilwar.org/walmart08. Thanks to Linda Smith of the Mary Todd Lincoln Tent #10 (Florida) for sending Ol’ Myrt this info.
    17. When it comes to spending money for genealogy research (either with photocopies or online access to public records), folks are all over the board including some who are quite angry about paying for access to public records. Take note of Elizabeth Shown Mills’ comments posting 17 Dec 2008 on the public APG Mailing List titled Chicago Marriage Records and other LDS databases. The subject line doesn’t really do Elizabeth’s comments justice. Trust me, you WANT to read this posting for a fresh look at realistic expenses to be expected as described by this high-profile genealogy expert who characterizes herself as having lived out in the “boonies”.
    18. Elizabeth deftly answers the questionIs Evidence (1997) still correct?’ indicating whether or not Evidence! Citation and Analysis (1997) has been superseded by Evidence Explained (2007, reprint 2008).
    19. Speaking of how we spend our genealogy research dollars, see how Randy Seaver obtained a second Ancestry Trial Offer.
    20. We’ve heard that we should use good manners when sending emails – and here is the historical equivalent described by Susan A. Kitchens in Burn that letter I sent”—83 years later, I’m glad she disobeyed.
    21. Even if you don't have Polish roots, we all may learn from a new project undertaking by Joseph Martin and Ceil Jensen. The task: document the Polish community of Calumet, Michigan. They received a travel grant to work in the archives of Michigan Tech this past June. Ceil describes this as atypical research, since most Polish communities were founded in urban centers. They continue to find more descendants of these miners who share family stories, photos and documents. Others who wish to document a community will benefit from the example of this project located at http://calumetmi.blogspot.com.
    22. Great last minute gift: Dan Lynch's Google Your Family Tree. Ol' Myrt has underlined and posted sticky notes all through her personal copy. Dan's got great ideas for making the most of more than Google search. You'd be surprised at the other Google tools of interest to family historians.
    23. Highlight for next year: The National Archives (US) will honor the Lincoln Bicentennial with a film and lecture series in honor of the 200th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth January 17 & 22nd 2009. (Gosh that is hard to type 2009!)

    Happy family tree climbing!
    Myrt :)
    DearMYRTLE,
    Your friend in genealogy.
    Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

    Blogs:
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
    http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

    Podcasts:
    DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
    http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

    Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
    http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

    DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
    http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
    © 2008 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

    This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
    http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.