Friday, July 10, 2009

TheOriginalRecord.com: 9 July update (UK)

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was just received from our friends at TheOriginalRecord.com. Please address all inquiries to admin@theoriginalrecord.com.

From: admin@theoriginalrecord.com
9 July 2009
DearMYRTLE,

1180-1256
Dublin Guild Merchant Rolls

In 1870 documents of the Anglo-Normans in Ireland from 1172 to 1320, edited by J. T. Gilbert, Secretary of the Public Record Office of Ireland, were printed in the Rerum Britannicarum Medii Aevi Scriptores series. These include transcripts of the Dublin guild merchant rolls surviving from that period, which we have now indexed. The earliest of these rolls, is damaged, but can be dated to about 1180 to 1200. Those named, although enjoying the privilege of trading in Dublin, were not necessarily resident there, and in several cases a name will be followed by an English address, such as 'de Wigornia' (from Worcester).


Inquisitions Ad Quod Damnum
1345-1485

Inquisitions ad quod damnum were held by the appropriate sheriff or escheator (or other officer in whose bailiwick the matter in question might lie) to investigate cases in which the royal or public interest might be damaged by proposed alienation or settlement of land (especially alienation to religious uses, into mortmain). The key findings from these inquisitions were as to the tenure of the land and the service due from it; its yearly value; the lands remaining to the grantor, and whether they sufficed to discharge all duties and customs due from him; and whether he can still be put upon juries, assizes and recognitions, so that the country be not burdened by his withdrawal from them. Generally speaking, this process had the makings of a system of licensing such alienations, and raising money in proportion to the valuations. Equally, there are many items that deal with subjects such as the closing of public roads, the felling or inclosing of woods, or the proposed grant of liberties or immunities. A calendar of these inquisitions from the 19th year of the reign of king Edward III to the 2nd year of Richard III was prepared by the Public Record Office and published in 1906. We have now indexed this calendared by surname and county. Most of the individuals appearing in the calendar are either pious individuals seeking to make grants to religious bodies for the sake of their souls; or landowners securing the disposition and settling of their real estate. But some other names do appear - tenants, trustees, chaplains and clerks.


1701
London Gazette

The London Gazette of this period contained much political news, a few official notices, and a section of Advertisements. The Advertisements are diverse: some seeking to publicize a sale, an event, a publication, or a service; others appealing for help in tracing missing persons, property, or horses; bankruptcy notices &c. We have separated out all this material into different categories for indexing.


1741
South Britain Calendar
'A General List, or Catalogue, Of all the Offices and Officers Employ'd In the several Branches of his Majesty's Government Ecclesiastical, Civil, Military, &c. In South-Britain, or England' gives the names (and often the annual salaries) of the government functionaries, civil servants, churchmen and military, systematically arranged section by section.


1757-1760
Board of Stamps Apprenticeship Books: Country Collectors’ Returns
Apprenticeship indentures and clerks' articles were subject to a 6d or 12d per pound stamp duty: the registers of the payments usually give the master's trade, address, and occupation, and the apprentice's name, as well as details of the date and length of the apprenticeship. There are central registers for collections of the stamp duty in London, as well as returns from collectors in the provinces. These collectors generally received duty just from their own county, but sometimes from further afield. The indentures themselves can date from a year or two earlier than this return. Each collector's return for each year has been indexed separately. IR 1/53


1905
India List

The India List and India Office List was compiled from official records by direction of the Secretary of State for India in Council, and published by the India Office annually. It covers civil servants and military except for officers drawing substantive pay of less than 500 rupees a month. Names shown in italics are those of officers in foreign service, supernumerary, seconded or employed outside their own departments.


1916
Roll of Honour

Lists of names of soldiers wounded, died of wounds, died, killed, missing presumed dead, and taken prisoner by the enemy, were issued to the British national press under the title Roll of Honour. Each man is identified by surname, initials and number. The regimental returns from which the daily Roll was compiled were made up over the previous week or weeks. Each regimental return may be partial, covering only part of the alphabet. The lists are provisional, in that a man reported wounded one day may appear as died of wounds later; a missing presumed dead may later be reported as having been found, or as having died; the lists of prisoners of war were provided by the enemy and will relate to captures weeks earlier. However, these rolls are the most comprehensive single source of names of British and allied combatants meeting with misfortune in the Great War. This is the roll published 2 August 1916.


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