Tuesday, October 20, 2009

NEW Second Edition of EVIDENCE EXPLAINED

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: It is with anxious anticipation that we've looked forward to this news item as there are references to Second Life notecards. Please address all inquiries to sales@genealogical.com.


Announcing the New Second Edition of Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace, by Elizabeth Shown Mills
originally posted in Genealogy Pointers (10-20-09)

Following its enthusiastic reception in 2007, we are pleased to announce a new edition of what is now the definitive guide to the citation and analysis of historical sources, a guide so thorough that it leaves nothing to chance, whether you want to cite a podcast or a census record. The new second edition of Evidence Explained includes updates to numerous websites, new models for electronic sources such as blogs and online forums, and new model citations to traditional and non-traditional genealogical sources, thus continuing its role as the single-most comprehensive style manual for genealogical writing and publishing.

Evidence Explained has two principal uses: it provides citation models for most historical sources-especially original materials not covered by classic citation guides such as The Chicago Manual of Style. Beyond that it can help us understand each type of record and identify each in such detail that we and our readers will know not only where to go to find our source, but, equally important, the nature of that source so that the evidence can be better interpreted and the accuracy of our conclusions properly appraised.

Evidence Explained was the winner of the National Genealogical Society's 2008 Award of Excellent, and it was named a "Best Reference 2007" by the prestigious magazine Library Journal. Following are some highlights of this superb reference work
  • Covers all contemporary and electronic sources not discussed in traditional style manuals, including digital, audio, and video sources
  • Explains citation principles and includes more than 1,000 citation models for virtually every source type
  • Shows readers where to go to find their sources and how to describe them and evaluate them
  • Teaches readers to separate facts from assertions and theory from proof in the evaluation of evidence

Reviews of the First Edition

"The definitive guide for how to cite every conceivable kind of source a historian might use, from traditional archival materials to digital media to the most arcane sources imaginable."-John B. Boles, Editor, Journal of Southern History

"Meant not only as a style guide for the types of source citations used by genealogists and historians, this book also discusses why analysis of information within the total context of a source is imperative to understanding the nature of a 'fact.' Citations not only tell where the source was found, but also can indicate a level of confidence to knowledgeable researchers."-Association of Professional Genealogists Quarterly (December 2007)

". . . pays special attention to the proper citation of multimedia materials and online resources and to understanding their role as evidence in historical research. . . .[T]his 14-chapter guide could scarcely be more comprehensive or thorough. It outlines foundational issues of evidence and citation analysis and then details the citation of specific types of materials."-Choice (March 2008)

"The heart of the book . . . presents more than one thousand citation models. . . . Most valuable are models for contemporary sources (Web sites, digital books and journals, DVDs, CDs, audio files, podcasts, e-zines, and others) and genealogical sources not covered elsewhere (artifacts, family group sheets, FHL preservation film, lineage society applications, genetic testing reports, grave markers, blogs, online forums, and such). . . . In standardizing a family history style, Mills has advanced the discipline. She has given genealogical researchers, writers, editors, and publishers invaluable new tools to bring quality and consistency to their work and distinction to the field."- National Genealogical Society Quarterly (September 2007)

"You no longer have to guess how to cite your sources-there is an example for everything imaginable. . . . [U]sers will find comfort in knowing nothing has been left to chance-anyone will be able to follow the trail back to the source used."- The Virginia Genealogical Society Newsletter (October 2007)


"Carry it around and look up the correct citation of any source you come across. Keep it at your side to help you identify sources and use it to evaluate digital and internet sources."-Bluegrass Roots (Fall 2007)

"Evidence Explained . . . is more than a mere expansion of Evidence! Citation & Analysis for the Family Historian. As a transition, it is the next generation of genealogical and historical documentation style guide and will likely remain so for years to come. It should be on every genealogist's shelf to be consulted often."-New Mexico Genealogist (March 2008)
"Separate citation examples for print, film, and electronic formats are included when applicable. . . . This is an essential resource for family historians; highly recommended for all libraries."-Library Journal (November 2007)

About the Author
Elizabeth Shown Mills is a historical writer with decades of research experience in public and private records. Published widely in academic and popular presses, Mills edited a national-level scholarly journal for sixteen years, taught for thirteen years at a National Archives-based institute for archival records and, for twenty years, has headed a university-based program in advanced research methodology. She is the author, among other books, of Evidence! Citation & Analysis for the Family Historian (1997) and the editor of Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers, and Librarians (2001).

For more information about (or to order a copy of) the new 2nd edition of Evidence Explained, please click on the following link:http://www.genealogical.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&item_number=3843

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