Saturday, February 28, 2009

1, 5-10 year possibilities (Part F) - FamilySearch Wiki

DearREADERS,
My friend Lisa Alzo queried Ol’ Myrt and a number of other genealogy writers for input about trends we see coming down the pike in the world of genealogy. She plans to work the feedback we provided into an article for Family Chronicle magazine. However, her request did not preclude the cross posting of my thoughts on the subject here in my blog over the next few days. I look forward to reading what my colleagues think the future holds for family historians when Lisa’s article goes to press.

In response to What Sources (databases, technologies, etc.) or trends you think will be “hot” in the coming year, Ol’ Myrt continued by noting:

FamilySearch WIKI
A growing entity, this wiki will benefit researchers who aren’t sure how to proceed with records research in a newly discovered ancestral place. I may know a lot about Maryland research, but find the FamilySearch Wiki provides ideas and insights for other areas where I am just venturing out in research. This will eventually replace the research outlines, and are fully annotatable by practically anyone.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/
http://blog.teachgenealogy.com/

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com/

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com/

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Friday, February 27, 2009

1, 5-10 year possibilities (Part E) - Ancestry's "wiggling leaf"

DearREADERS,
My friend Lisa Alzo queried Ol’ Myrt and a number of other genealogy writers for input about trends we see coming down the pike in the world of genealogy. She plans to work the feedback we provided into an article for Family Chronicle magazine. However, her request did not preclude the cross posting of my thoughts on the subject here in my blog over the next few days. I look forward to reading what my colleagues think the future holds for family historians when Lisa’s article goes to press.

In response to What Sources (databases, technologies, etc.) or trends you think will be “hot” in the coming year, Ol’ Myrt continued by noting:

ANCESTRY’S “Wiggling leaf”
Its hard to ignore the option to have Ancestry’s search engines look for possible matches to a five generation GEDCOM file you’ve uploaded in either private or public access family tree mode. Skirting around the limitation, one may begin compiling the GEDCOM file with a 6th generation ancestor, just to see what’s available. There are so many databases at Ancestry it is all too easy to get lost in the currently irrelevant hit list that may include New York and Australia, when you’ve specified an ancestor’s birth, marriage and death locations as Pennsylvania.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/
http://blog.teachgenealogy.com/

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com/

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com/

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Thursday, February 26, 2009

1, 5-10 year possibilities (Part D) - better searches

DearREADERS,
My friend Lisa Alzo queried Ol’ Myrt and a number of other genealogy writers for input about trends we see coming down the pike in the world of genealogy. She plans to work the feedback we provided into an article for Family Chronicle magazine. However, her request did not preclude the cross posting of my thoughts on the subject here in my blog over the next few days. I look forward to reading what my colleagues think the future holds for family historians when Lisa’s article goes to press.

In response to What Sources (databases, technologies, etc.) or trends you think will be “hot” in the coming year, Ol’ Myrt continued by noting:

BETTER SEARCHES
Using the Steve P. Morse model, more innovative researchers will create programs to circumvent the cumbersome search engines at Footnote.com, WorldVitalRecords.com and Ancestry.com, etc. Even using a Google “Site:” search is often the better alternative if you are hoping to have more relevant hits.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/
http://blog.teachgenealogy.com/

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com/

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com/

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

FamilyLink.com, Inc. raises $2.4 Million

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following has just come across the news wires about our friends at FamilyLink.com. Please address all inquiries to whitney@familylink.com.

FamilyLink.com, Inc. Raises $2.4 Million Series B Funding Round

Funding growth of leading social network for families

PROVO, Utah, Feb. 25 /PRNewswire/ -- FamilyLink.com recently raised $2.85 million in Series B funding as social networking services continue to grow even during difficult economic times.

FamilyLink.com raised its initial round of funding of $1.25 million in August 2007.

Several Series A investors joined the Series B funding round, including vSpring Capital and TTP Capital Advisors of Japan. Several other angel investors joined in the B round.

FamilyLink.com is the developer of "We're Related," one of the most popular applications on Facebook. We're Related is used by nearly a million people every day. The company's flagship social networking site will launch later this quarter at FamilyLink.com.

"Social networking with family and friends is growing faster than any other online activity," said CEO Paul B. Allen. "Research shows that protecting the family is the top human value in most nations. Technology enables families to keep in touch despite distance, and we think this desire to stay in touch will only deepen in hard economic times."

FamilyLink.com turned profitable in late 2008 as it was finalizing its fund-raising efforts. The company employs 30 people in the U.S., including in Seattle, WA, Boulder, CO, and its headquarters in Provo, Utah, and has development offices in India and the Philippines.

The company's goal is to become the global leader in family social networking on all social networks and mobile platforms. The FamilyLink.com, Inc. network of sites became one of the Top 500 Web companies in the world in December 2008, based on Quantcast statistics.

Currently the network ranks at #165 based on total monthly unique visitors, making the company one of the fastest growing web properties in the world.

View Quantcast ranking and traffic estimates for FamilyLink.com


Unlike other social networks, FamilyLink uses family trees and genealogy as a key ingredient in creating engagement in its social networking experience for families. The company owns WorldVitalRecords.com, a popular genealogy subscription site, and later this year will introduce its flagship genealogy web site, GenSeek.com.

"We think GenSeek will become the world's largest gateway to family history content," explained Steve Nickle, President. "Combined with our family social networks, it will make it easier than ever before for family members to explore and share their heritage with all of their relatives. Our historic partnership with FamilySearch Catalog will enable us to launch GenSeek.com with links to millions of the world's most valuable genealogy sources."

About FamilyLink.com, Inc.
FamilyLink.com, Inc. is the leading social networking company for families globally. It was formed in 2006 by original founding executives of Ancestry.com and MyFamily.com. The company operates several genealogy web sites and has popular applications on Facebook, MySpace, Bebo, Hi5, and Friendster. The company's We're Related application is currently the third most popular application on Facebook and has helped users define more than 150 million family relationships. FamilyLink.com, Inc. also operates the AdMazing ad network that represents more than 200 million monthly impressions on high traffic family history and heritage sites. Genealogy partners include Everton, brightsolid, Statute of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, Genealogical Publishing Company, FindAGrave.com, Godfrey Memorial Library, and FamilySearch.

Source:
FamilyLink.com, Inc.

CONTACT:
Whitney Ransom McGowan,
Corporate Communications Director of
FamilyLink.com, Inc.
1-801-377-0588
whitney@familylink.com,

Web Site: http://www.familylink.com

1, 5-10 year possibilities (Part C) - Mega-Search sites

DearREADERS,
My friend Lisa Alzo queried Ol’ Myrt and a number of other genealogy writers for input about trends we see coming down the pike in the world of genealogy. She plans to work the feedback we provided into an article for Family Chronicle magazine. However, her request did not preclude the cross posting of my thoughts on the subject here in my blog over the next few days. I look forward to reading what my colleagues think the future holds for family historians when Lisa’s article goes to press.

In response to What Sources (databases, technologies, etc.) or trends you think will be “hot” in the coming year, Ol’ Myrt continued by noting:

MEGA-SEARCH SITES
LiveRoots.com and MyHeritage.com are two of an emerging group of websites providing a single data input form that searches multiple database websites in one fell swoop. Such services save a researcher the effort of visiting ten different sites, and typing in the request again and again only to have to repeat it each week or so, as new content is added.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/
http://blog.teachgenealogy.com/

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com/

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com/

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

MyHeritage: updated search engine combs 12 billion names

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was jsut received from our friends at MyHeritage.com. Please address all inquiries to Daniel@MyHeritage.com.

SIGNIFICANT IMPROVEMENTS AND EXPANSION FOR MYHERITAGE GENEALOGY SEARCH ENGINE

The updated “MyHeritage Research” now queries around 12 billion names in 1,526 genealogy databases from across the internet

Tel Aviv, Israel – February 19, 2009 – Our latest addition made the MyHeritage Genealogy Search Engine more powerful, as we have expanded our database to include now 1,526 genealogically relevant databases, representing more than 12 billion names.

You can get to it by going to http://www.myheritage.com/research or you can still access it directly from our software Family Tree Builder.

We have expanded our database by 150+ new sources. Some of the new sources are:
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • Spock people finder
  • Michigan Census
  • German Emigrants Database
  • BMD Registers UK
  • USA Gov search
  • Western Michigan Newspapers
  • Palatines to America
  • US Social Security Death Index
  • Prague Police Headquarters Conscriptions (1850-1914)
  • Consolidated Index of Sephardic Surnames
  • Arizona Birth and Death Certificates
  • European Patent Office

MyHeritage Research accesses only genealogical resources which helps researchers find those websites and databases most relevant to their unique family histories. This allows you a much quicker and efficient search, so you don't have to wade through volumes of non relevant records.

You can perform a name search using different spelling options: Exact, Soundex, or our unique Megadex spelling variations. Megadex allows you to choose from the most commonly used spelling variations of last names, cutting down on the time needed to research name variations. Read more about Megadex here:
http://www.myheritage.com/FP/Company/megadex.php

Using the Advanced Search option, you can add birth and death dates. Based on the information you enter, our search engine will automatically select the databases most relevant to your search. There is a lot more information on the Advanced Search on our genealogy blog!

In addition, MyHeritage allow you to store and annotate your searches for further reference.

These tools allow you to focus on the results of your search, not the mechanics.

We hope those extensions will make it easier for everyone to research their family history and improve the family tree.

About MyHeritage
MyHeritage was founded by a team of people who combine a passion for family history with the development of innovative technology. It is now one of the world’s leading online networks for families, and the second largest family history website. MyHeritage is available in 34 languages and home to more than 28 million family members and 300 million profiles. The company recently acquired Kindo, a family social network, and is based in Bnei Atarot, near Tel Aviv, Israel. For more information, visit http://www.myheritage.com/.

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Genline: Swedish BMD 1898-1920 added

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: Our friends at Genline have provided us the February update of newly added records. Please address all inquiries to usinfo@genline.com, 800-975-5493 and search the records on the web at http://www.genline.com.

Birth, marriage, and death records between 1898 and 1920 have now been added to Genline for the following counties:

Gävleborg
Jönköping
Kalmar
Malmöhus
Södermanland
Västmanland
Örebro
Östergötland

Records for more than 200 of the 281 parishes within Skaraborg have been added to Genline and daily more records are being added. Click here for the preliminary production plan for the addition of church records up to 1937.

PLEASE ALSO NOTE:
Representatives from Genline Sweden will be visiting North America in May. Peter Wallenskog, member of Genline's Board of Directors, Mikko Ollinen, CEO of Genline, and David Fogelberg will be making stops in Illinois, Minnesota, Lindsborg, Kansas and at the NGS Conference in Raleigh, NC to visit customers and present information about new Genline initiatives.

1, 5-10 year possibilities (Part A & B)

DearREADERS,
My friend Lisa Alzo queried Ol’ Myrt and a number of other genealogy writers for input about trends we see coming down the pike in the world of genealogy. She plans to work the feedback we provided into an article for Family Chronicle magazine. However, her request did not preclude the cross-posting of my thoughts on the subject here in my blog over the next few days. I look forward to reading what my colleagues think the future holds for family historians when Lisa's article goes to press.

In response to What sources (databases, technologies, etc.) or trends you think will be “hot” in the coming year, Ol’ Myrt began by noting:

FAMILY HISTORY CATALOG
As Web2 technology emerges for all Internet users, genealogists can look forward to the debut of the comprehensive Family History Catalog, a joint effort between FamilySearch.org and WorldVitalRecords.org rumored to debut in May 2009. This project was first announced in a press conference at the National Genealogical Society’s 2008 Conference in the States in Kansas City, and was spotlighted in DearMYRTLE’s blog 14 May 2008 FHLCatalog - enhancements & partnership. The catalog will list all known locations of genealogy databases, indexes, scanned images, microfilm, books, etc. at places not limited to the Family History Library and FamilySearch.org, by incorporating information from genealogy websites, library catalogs and online books. Users will be able to annotate a catalog entry, pointing followers to the better version of scanned census images, etc.

GenSmarts OVERHAULED
With the advent of the Family History Catalog, Aaron Underwood will be quite busy redesigning GenSmarts to compare your current genealogy database (and its missing data fields) with what’s listed in the new catalog. The resulting to-do list will provide short-cuts for those of us who are simply overwhelmed when considering where to go and what to do next by pointing to indexes, scanned images, books, microfilm and fiche that might provide additional information about our ancestors.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Monday, February 23, 2009

Historic South Carolina African American Records to Be Published Online

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was just received from our friend Toni Carrier of the Lowcounty Africana project. Please address all inquiries to Toni Carrier, toni@lowcountryafricana.com.

Lowcountry Africana and The South Carolina Department of Archives and History today announced plans to digitize and publish freely online more than 25,000 historic documents of interest to researchers of African American genealogy and history.

Under the new agreement, Colonial and Charleston, South Carolina estate inventories dated 1732-1867 will be digitized and indexed in detail, including the names of more than 30,000 slaves. Inventories of estates in early South Carolina probate records often listed slaves in family groupings. They also detail the material possessions so important for researchers of social and cultural history. "South Carolina has one of the richest sets of early government records of any of the original states,” said Charles Lesser, Senior Archivist at the South Carolina Department of Archives and History.” This new cooperative effort will revolutionize access to an especially important segment of those records," concluded Lesser.

More than 14,000 South Carolina bills of sale, most of them bills of sale for slaves, will also be digitized for online viewing. These documents, dating from 1773 to 1872, are already indexed on the South Carolina Archives website but have not yet been digitized.

"Digitizing these records will open new avenues for African American genealogy research by forming, in many cases, a seamless paper trail from Emancipation to the 1700's," said Toni Carrier, Founding Director of Lowcountry Africana. "And Charleston's role as a port of entry during the Atlantic Slave Trade means that many thousands of African Americans have at least one ancestor who came from, or through, South Carolina."

When complete, the index and digital images of the documents will be available for free on Lowcountry Africana (www.lowcountryafricana.com), and within the On-line Records Index for the South Carolina Department of Archives and History (www.archivesindex.sc.gov).

Anyone may volunteer to help index the records by visiting www.afriquest.com, Lowcountry Africana's new, central Internet home for free records of African American genealogy and history. Afriquest will officially launch at the end of February but volunteers may sign up now to participate.

Copies of the microfilms of the original historic documents were donated by FamilySearch International.

For further information, please contact Toni Carrier at toni@lowcountryafricana.com.

About the South Carolina Department of Archives and History
The Department of Archives and History is the official repository for South Carolina's state and local government records. Their Online Records Index already provides free index access to over 300,000 documents and digital images of some 100,000 pages of South Carolina public records.

About Lowcountry Africana
Lowcountry Africana is an all-volunteer research project and free website devoted to the family and cultural history of African Americans in the rice-growing areas of South Carolina, Georgia, and northeastern Florida; home to the rich Gullah-Geechee cultural heritage. The Magnolia Plantation Foundation of Charleston, SC sponsored the development of Lowcountry Africana.

Their new Afriquest database will be international in scope and will be a free, central Internet database of records of African American genealogy and history. Afriquest will officially launch the February 28, 2009.

About FamilySearch
FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons can access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,500 family history centers in 70 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Friday, February 20, 2009

New Indexing Resource Guide

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: More info from our friends at FamilySearch. Please address all inquiries to support@FamilySearch.org.

New Indexing Resource Guide

During the most recent update to the FamilySearch Indexing Web site, a resource guide was added under the Help tab. This page is a quick reference tool for finding answers to most indexing questions. It includes resources for indexers, arbitrators, group administrators, and stake extraction directors. It also includes language resources, such as handwriting helps for English, Latin, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian, German, and Dutch.

To find the resource guide, go to www.familysearchindexing.org, click on the Help tab, and then click Publications.

Recently Completed Projects

(Note: Recently completed projects have been removed from the available online indexing batches and will now go through a final completion check process in preparation for future publication.)
  • Argentina Censo 1869 – Buenos Aires 2
  • Arkansas – 1920 US Census
  • Colorado – 1920 US Census
  • Connecticut – 1920 US Census
  • Delaware – 1920 US Census
  • Massachusetts 1855 State Census
  • Massachusetts Death Records 1915
  • Massachusetts Marriages 1906-1915
  • Massachusetts Marriages – Part 2
  • New Hampshire – Early to 1900 Deaths
  • Tlaxcala 1930 Mexico Census
Current FamilySearch Indexing Projects
Record Language, and Percent Completion
  • Argentina Censo 1869 - Cordoba y San Luis Spanish 66%
  • Argentina Censo 1869 - Corrientes y Entre Rios Spanish 3%
  • Arkansas Marriages – Part 3 English 35%
  • Belgium - Antwerp Foreigners Index English 19%
  • Brandenburg Kirchenbücher German 38%*
  • District of Columbia - 1920 US Federal Census English 38%
  • España Lugo Registros Parroquiales [Part 1] Spanish 15%
  • España Ávila Registros Parroquiales Spanish 32%
  • Florida 1885 Census English 36%
  • Florida 1935 Census English 95%
  • France, Coutances, Paroisses de la Manche French 8%
  • Massachusetts - 1865 State Census English 74%
  • Nayarit – Censo de Mexico de 1930 English 44%
  • New Brunswick 1871 Census English 3%
  • Nicaragua, Managua Civil Records Spanish 10%
  • Norway 1875 Census part 1 Norwegian 4%
  • Nova Scotia 1871 Census English 3%
  • Ontario 1861 Census English 42%
  • Sonora – Censo de Mexico de 1930 Spanish 12%
  • St Petersburg Kirchenbuchduplikat 1833-1885 German 1%
  • Tabasco – Censo de Mexico de 1930 Spanish 10%
  • Trento Italy Baptism Records, 1784-1924 Italian 49%
  • UK - Cheshire - Church Records English 85%
  • UK - Cheshire - Land Tax English 13%
  • UK – Cheshire – School Records English 7%
  • Ukraine Kyiv 1840-1842 Russian 3%
  • Venezuela Mérida Registros Parroquiales Spanish 1%

(*This percentage refers to a specific portion of a larger project.)

Current FamilySearch Affiliate Projects
Record Language, and Percent Completion

Arkansas Marriages IV English 36%
Belgique – Registres Des Décès (Français) French 14%
België - Overlijdens Registers - In het Nederlands Dutch, Flemish 16%
Bremer Schifflisten German 27%
Flanders Death Registration French, Dutch, Flemish 37%
Indiana Marriages 1882-Apr 1905 English 69%
Nova Scotia Antigonish Church Records English 54%
Ohio Tax Records – 2 of 4 English 67%
Vermont Militia Records English 18%


FamilySearch: 19 Feb 2009 update

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received overnight from our friends at FamilySearch. Please address all inquiries to support@FamilySearch.org.

19 February 2009

Familysearch added over 6 million new indexed records and 1.4 million new images since January 5, 2009, to its Record Search pilot (see chart below).


The West Virginia birth, marriage, and death records, and the South Dakota state censuses for 1915 and 1925 are now complete. Many thanks to the thousands of online FamilySearch Indexing volunteers who helped make these wonderful records available. See the chart below for more details. The new records can be searched for free at www.FamilySearch.org (Click Search Records, then Record Search pilot).

Record Search visitors might also notice the following changes to the pilot site after the latest update.
1. Region map flyover now lists the number of collections in a region
2. Rotate an image clockwise or counterclockwise in the viewer
3. New full screen view in the image viewer
4. Search form now displays the collection being searched
5. Image navigation- moved previous, next & go to buttons to the bottom of the page
6. Collection list page is now a single column
7. Image only collections are identified
8. Changes to print selected area


Collection Name
Indexed Records
Digital Images
Comments
1920 United States Census
3,652,688
77,119
Added California

1915 South Dakota Census
613,769
613,769
New and complete

1925 South Dakota Census
705,319
705,285
New and complete

West Virginia Births
68,391
Updated – 3 new indexed counties (Brooke, Kanawha, and Upshur). Collection should now be complete.

West Virginia Deaths
184,426
Updated – 3 new indexed counties (Brooke, Kanawha, and Upshur). Collection should now be complete.

West Virginia Marriages
275,877
Updated – 3 new indexed counties (Brooke, Kanawha, and Upshur). Collection should now be complete.

Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates
924,602
910,059
New

Illinois, Cook County Birth Registers
63,933 1,844
New

International Vital Records Handbook

DearREADERS,
From Genealogical Publishing Company we read “At one time or another all of us need copies of birth, marriage, or death certificates for driver's licenses, passports, jobs, social security, family history research, or for simple proof of identify. But the requirements and fees needed to obtain copies of vital records vary from state to state and from country to country, often requiring a time-wasting exchange of correspondence before the appropriate forms can be obtained. The International Vital Records Handbook puts an end to all that, as it offers complete, up-to-date information on how and where to request vital records. It also includes copies of the application forms, where available, thus simplifying and speeding up the process by which vital records are obtained.”

So CONGRATS to compiler Thomas Jay Kemp on the brand-spanking new 5th edition, now available from our friends at Genealogical.com.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com
http://blog.teachgenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/ . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Attending physicians aren’t usually stone cutters

DearREADERS,
My dear friend Mark Tucker of ThinkGenealogy.com composed a thought-provoking blog entry earlier this week about the emerging definition of “original” sources of information. He compared definitions provided in ProGenealogy, Evidence! and Evidence Explained. Please read his Confusion with the Various Definitions of Original Source posted 18 February 2009. That will put Ol’ Myrt’s reply into perspective.

DearMARK,
Ol' Myrt here always delights in seeing how your mind works. Thank-you for this write-up.

I beg to differ with you about gravestones.

The fact that there are no clear lines of distinction is EXACTLY what you are trying to resolve in this blog entry.

Simply put, Ol' Myrt here contends that a gravestone is certainly NOT an original source, since it is unlikely the attending physician is the stone cutter who carved the name and date of the deceased on the marker and then stuck around long enough to see that the stone was placed on the correct grave site.

I know of one instance where a fellow genealogist was so overwhelmed by his father's death, that when the 15 copies of the death certificate came in, he just put them in a desk drawer. I came on the scene as this son was recovering from prostate surgery. I noticed that the spacing of numbers for the SS# weren't correct -- and in fact figured out that funeral home had placed a fax number in the Social Security Number field on the form.

Now, I know that on a death certificate, there are primary and secondary forms of information provided. And a death certificate isn’t the same thing as a gravestone. That is not Ol' Myrt's point.

The fact that YOU checked, and rechecked the accuracy of your mother's tombstone information, doesn't mean everyone performs such due diligence.

What if you had been so distraught that you simply weren't able to go to the gravesite for a few years? This isn't unheard of, you know. And over time, we all remember things differently. Maybe in a few years when one does venture to a loved one’s gravesite, through the tears, a mistake in the gravestone inscription might not be discerned.

Bottom line:
Attending physicians aren’t usually stone cutters.


So, DearREADERS, what are your thoughts on the subject?

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

GenealogyBank: Enhanced search options

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: Thanks to our friend Tom Kemp for the heads up about new options at GenealogyBank.com, and am now happy to report these search enhancements have gone live as noted in this email announcement to members shown below. Please address all inquiries to support@genealogybank.com .

At GenealogyBank, we're busier than ever adding new content and improved functionality to improve your family research experience.

Just Added! Search Historical Newspapers by Title, City, Article Type or Search New Content Only! Incorporating member feedback in our development is just one way we try to make GenealogyBank your go-to source for family history information. That's why we wanted you to be the first to know that the new search features we’ve been testing for months have recently gone live. These new features will let you better focus your searches to find what you're looking for for quickly and easily. Search Historical Newspapers

Plus! Over Six Million Family History Records Added This Month. We've also just added new family history information from 22 states and 40 newspapers, including:

Your membership now includes access to over 3,800 newspapers from all 50 states—including 257 million family history records and an estimated one billion names.

We appreciate your patronage and input, and we look forward to bringing you more content and enhancements throughout 2009!

Dig deeper into your family history, start research now at www.GenealogyBank.com

Visiting the FHLibrary in Salt Lake City

From: snrylisa@comcast.net
DearMYRTLE,

I enjoy your blog very much and look forward to them every day! I get to spend a week at the FHL in late February and I'm so excited. I haven't been since 2002, the Olympics year. So, since it's been a while, I'm wondering about computers. Is there wireless available at the Library? I like to bring my laptop because I like having my whole database in front of me while I'm looking at films (which I do most there). I tried looking on the FHL website but didn't have much luck. Can you help me?

DearLISA,
YES, bring your laptop! There is free wireless Internet available at the Family History Library and the connection seems to be fast. But get one of those lock-down cables for security.

The downtown area is all torn up to rebuild a few major skyscrapers with earthquake resistant standards. YES, there is still JB’s restaurant on the corner of West Temple and South Temple just south of the Family History Library. Review DearMYRTLE’s Salt Lake City Map (at Google Maps) to see where the local restaurants, drug and grocery stores are located. I have a particular fondness for Rodizzio’s Grill at Trolley Square, but you’d have to take a taxi as it isn’t within walking distance like the Gateway shops and restaurants. I also recommend the Nauvoo Café in the SW first floor of the Joseph Smith Memorial Building. It is a short, mind-refreshing walk across historic Temple Square, and has just what you’d need in the way of made-to-order sandwiches and homemade soups.

Check the Library's holiday schedule to make sure it will be open. Never plan your visit when the LDS Church is holding it’s semi-annual general conference – the first weekend in October and the first weekend in April. You can imagine how faithful church members would come early or stay after the conference to do research at the Library. Ol’ Myrt doesn’t even go downtown during these busy times.

The Family History Library has classes that might interest you, so check the Monthly Schedule and arrange your days to accommodate them.

Before you come to Salt Lake City, print out Family History Library Catalog entries for 40-60 items and then jot a quick note on each one about what you expect to find. (IE “Paul Froman’s will - circa 1783”). This works well since often after a long day of research, you cannot figure out where to go next. Your printouts will serve as guideposts, and you won’t have to think through the logic.

Pre-order “vault” items, a process that can take up to three days to retrieve. Items so labeled in the catalog are stored offsite. Request the “vault” microfilms you need by e-mail, telephone, or fax. US/Canada films: (801) 240-7378. British Isles: (801)240-7379. Other countries: (801)240-2334. Fax (801)240-1924.

View “Does not circulate to Family History Centers” material first. This would include books, maps, certain microfilm/fiche and CDs. Speaking of those genealogy data CDs, you will no longer “check them out” in person as they are loaded on a server. However, only one person in the network of computers at the Family History Library can “view” the CD at a time. Be sure to log out as soon as you have completed your research with one of them.

Even though you have your laptop, use Family History Library computers for free access to certain fee-based subscription websites. Since this list can change, it isn’t included here.

Bring flash drives to store photocopies from books and microfilm/fiche. This will save you tons of luggage space, a tip that is particularly timely now that the airlines charge for “extra” luggage. Be sure to name the scanned image files consistently such as:

FROMANPaul_will_01
FROMANPaul_will_02
FROMANPaul_KYland01

Be sure to check out the floor plan of the Library. If the line gets backed up in the copy center of one floor, equipment may be available on another floor.

If Ol’ Myrt here is in town when you are visiting, perhaps we can do lunch?

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com
http://blog.teachgenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Thursday, February 19, 2009

WWII mystery solved

From: Laurie Haldeman-Lambe
DearMYRTLE,
Thought this article would interest you in how the U.S. Army is using genealogy to give relatives closure and to document what happened to their loved ones who didn't survive. I think it's a great service & one that deserves to be publicized. And you are the best person I know to do just that. Thanks for your column!!

DearLAURIE,

THANKS for sending me the link to WWII mystery solved by staff writer Deena Yellin on 14 Feb 2009, published online at NorthJersey.com. “Nearly 65 years after Pfc. Arthur Gallo Jr. was killed in the Battle of the Bulge, his niece, Camille Caminiti, now knows where his remains are buried. Gallo, a Brooklyn native, was 26 when he enlisted, and his parents did not talk about his death three years later in 1944. For years, Caminiti wished she knew what happened to her favorite uncle.”

When my DearREADERS find such newspaper articles on the Internet, I appreciate the heads up. Folks can do as you have done, by clicking the “email” option when available, then typing in Ol’ Myrt’s email address Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com. I do have all sorts of Google Alerts, but sometimes in my haste, and especially when traveling, I miss important articles such as the one you’ve shown me. Thanks for moving the conversation forward.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

WVR: 10 English Databases from Anguline

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: Our friends at World Vital Records have been busy adding content. See the following note quoted here. There are more details on the announcement page. For more info contact support@WorldVitalRecords.com .

Ten New English Databases From Anguline Research Archives 12 Feb 2009)
This week's major collection includes ten new databases from Anguline Research Archives (ARA). The databases include court, land, and probate records, genealogy guides, census and voter lists, birth marriage and death records, religious records, and directories and lists. The content is from the United Kingdom, particularly from England.

  • Court Rolls of the Honor of Clitheroe in the County of Lancaster, Volume 1 Transcripts of the Manor Court Rolls for the period 1377 - 1567. Also includes a list of the tenants and freeholders in 1443 and a list of the names of jurors for the period 1523 - 1567.
  • The International Genealogical Dictionary This is a directory of research interests submitted by genealogists from Great Britain, Ireland, America, Germany and other countries.
  • Cenotaphs in the Wakefield Area Transcripts and photographs of 76 war memorials in the West Yorkshire city of Wakefield and its surrounding towns and villages.
  • The Northern Genealogist, January 1895 Contains manor rolls, marriage bonds, indexes of wills, parish registers, genealogical notes from Durham and more.
  • List of the Roman Catholics in the County of York 1604 Taken from the original manuscripts held in the Bodleian Library, with additional genealogical notes, this listing of Roman Catholic Recusants and Noncommunicants covers towns and villages all across Yorkshire.
  • Registra Antiqua de Caerwent, 1568 - 1812 In Comitatu Monumethensi. Text in English. Transcribed from the original register books and edited by Bradney, to which is added a short account of the parishes and vicars.
  • The Eton Register: Continuation of Stapplton's Eton School Lists, 1893 - 1899 Contains list of provosts, fellows, masters, assistant masters, and more.
  • The Registers of the Cathedral Church of Rochester, 1657 - 1837
  • The Roffensian Register, Containing the Names of all Members of the School, 1835 - 1920 The Register of the King's School, Rochester, Kent.

About Anguline Research Archives (ARA)
ARA was founded by Guy Etchells and Angela Petyt B.A. (hons.). ARA is an organization dedicated to offering rare books on CD at an affordable price. It caters to both local history and family history researchers. ARA is located in Ossett, England.

Wednesday, February 18, 2009

UPDATE: Tuscaloosa County Courthouse preservation

From: Warren
DearMYRTLE,
In late 2007 there was much discussion on DearMYRTLE regarding the 19th century records stored on the 7th floor of the Tuscaloosa County Courthouse. This is a status report on where we stand at the end of 2008.

The Night Group of the Tuscaloosa Genealogical Society (NGTGS) has a standing Records Preservation Committee. This Committee is made up of a dedicated, committed, and enthusiastic group of volunteers. Its members possess the skills to make this project successful. The Committee includes expertise in handling rare books, library information systems, computers and networking, skilled administrators and seasoned genealogists. One person on the Committee coordinates with the Tuscaloosa Court House personnel.

Several other members of the NGTGS participate in the project as well as others in the community. The Alabama Credit Union provides working space, including utilities. Several others in Tuscaloosa offered space, but the Credit Union space was deemed the best for this project. One Night Group member has loaned tables and chairs for the project. Another member has loaned her personal computer. The NGTGS donated $1,000 for the purchase of a vacuum cleaner and other supplies and materials.

The Committee batches approximately forty volumes at a time. These are taken from the Courthouse to the work location. Because the page numbers were not always consecutive, and sadly some of the pages have been cut out, each volume was re-paginated. . So far, we have cleaned, inventoried, assessed and catalogued about 150 bound volumes

A first step in indexing these records occurred in early December. Jan Hutchison photographed all of the pages in three land tax volumes, covering the years 1887, 1888 and 1889. These pages were then put on eighteen CDs and distributed to volunteers for indexing. There are 20 to 25 pages on each CD. Rough estimates indicate this will amount to 18,000 names. Once indexed, the volunteers will return them for inclusion in the Master Index. These three volumes will serve as a beta test for our indexing procedures. The Committee is striving for accuracy and consistency and is attempting avoid false starts. So far, it appears these three objectives are being met.

We have cleared the harbor and are underway. We, however, have a long journey ahead of us.

We need more volunteers. The hours for working will be Monday from 1-4; Wednesday 10-2 and Thursday 10-2. We will also be available to work on the 1st Saturday of the month. Should you be able to get to Tuscaloosa and are interested in helping, please contact Jan Hutchison. Her e-mail address is: janhutchison@comcast.net. She will confirm your time and give you the location. If you want to work a day not listed, let Jan know.

Warren Spruill, Ph.D.
President,
The Night Group of the Tuscaloosa Genealogical Society
www.rootsweb.com/~alngtgs
P.O. Box 02802
Tuscaloosa, AL 35402-0802

DearWARREN,
GREAT hearing from you again. CONGRATS on your efforts. This is a prime example of how local genealogical and historical societies can step up to the plate. Thank-you for doing this. I know that the need is urgent at your courthouse, and the small contingent of dedicated volunteers is doing it's best. It seems the work can never get done fast enough.

Our mutual friend and long-time Tuscaloosa records advocate Mike Sullivan reminded me in a 19 January 2009 email that "considering all of the migration in and through Alabama during the 1800s, these endangered courthouse records are evidence of ancestors whose descendants now live coast to coast." He acknowledges historic records preservation issues extend beyond the boundaries of your county. Without concerted efforts, vital documents are in his words "just rotting away somewhere in Alabama".

To recap for my readers, here are links to most previous DearMYRTLE blog entries about Tuscaloosa's preservation challenge.
  • 24 July 2007 Tuscaloosa County Courthouse to scan & destroy original records Circuit Clerk Magaria Bobo explains Tuscaloosa County [Alabama] court documents will be scanned and destroyed, citing the delicate nature of old files." [However, scanning isn’t infallible.]
  • 8 August 2007 Courthouse video: a picture is worth a thousand TEARS. Includes video of the actual courthouse books housed in deplorable conditions.
  • [undated] August 2007 “Tuscaloosa & Greene County AL courthouse records at immediate risk. Will the Alabama Department of Archives & History create a 15th and 16th local government archives?” This blog entry includes a quote from Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG (Certified genealogist), CGL (Certified Genealogical Lecturer) and FASG (Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists) as follows: “In past years, I spent much time up in the Tuscaloosa County courthouse attic with those records. They are a goldmine of information not to be found anywhere else on the earliest settlers of the county—many of whom do not show up in the early land, marriage, and probate records. The records in Greene County are in even worse condition. When I last used them, they were piled in an outbuilding behind the jail, with—literally—rusted out lawnmowers piled on top of the heap.”
  • 13 Aug 2007 Alabama preservation efforts remain unclear. This project was in cooperation with FamilySearch, but did not cover the scope of records sitting in the roughed-in attic of the Tuscaloosa County Courthouse.
  • 21 August 2007 Triangulation: Analysis of historical documents Why we must revisit and review evidence to understand history. Here I wrote: "One cannot overemphasize the need of responsible citizens to look again at surviving documents to see if the history being taught is accurate, and that conclusions are not skewed by inappropriate societal pressures influencing the previous historian, who may have been too close to the situation to see the bigger picture. Microfilming and proper storage is the least we can do to preserve those documents for future generations. It is our legacy, it is their heritage."
  • 7 Sept 2007 Alabama preservation efforts remain unclear citing “County records also suffering from summer heat” by Howard Michael Sullivan, Tuscaloosa [Alabama] News, Wednesday, September 5, 2007. Reprinted by permission of the author.
  • 21 Sept 2007 Tuscaloosa County Courthouse Records Progress is slow but sure, and the local volunteers are on task. Courthouse apparently makes a 180 degree change in preservation policy. Here I wrote: “If those records are destroyed there is no turning back in the case of a blurred image on the microfilm.”

So, Warren, Ol' Myrt here prays you and your volunteers continue faithful in your preservation efforts. Compiling an inventory of each book and contents proves challenging since labeling is scant, deteriorating spines have splintered off, and movement of piles in the past has surely mixed things up. Manuscripts have probably been misfiled, owing to simple human error. If anyone can make sense of this, it is your group. You know the names, you know the history, you know the lay of the land.

Thank-you just isn't adequate to describe my feelings.

FOR FURTHER READING
DearMYRTLE's My letter urging preservation of American historic records published 2 June 2008 to encourage the US Senate to allocate funding to local governments for preservation of ancient documents.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/
http://blog.teachgenealogy.com/

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com/

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com/

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Ancestry.com: New content, FTM patch & webinars

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: Just got back from a week's trip to Washington, DC. Looks like Ol' Myrt's got a lot of catching up to do in the blogging department. The following was just received from our friends at Ancestry.com. Please address all inquiries to support@Ancestry.com.

In commemoration of Abraham Lincoln’s 200th birthday, Ancestry.com has added five new databases to its Civil War Collection.

The Abraham Lincoln Papers, which hail from the Library of Congress and are searchable for free on Ancestry.com, contains more than 20,000 documents such as drafts of speeches, incoming and outgoing correspondence with the president, and printed material. Learn more about the Civil War collection at www.ancestry.com/civilwar.

Ancestry Content Updates

U.S. Content
In addition, we recently updated two U.S. collections:

International Content
An update to the existing England & Wales Birth Index collection, made 134 million General Records Office (GRO) UK birth records for England and Wales dating from 1837 to 2005 available online for the first time. To find out more, read Echo King’s blog entry: the UK Birth Index Update.

We’ve also recently added or updated the following international databases:

You can view the full list of recently added databases, extending back a couple of months, at http://www.ancestry.com/search/rectype/recent.aspx.

Website and Product Updates
How has your family story changed your life?Ancestry.com is looking for family history success stories. Share an amazing discovery you made on Ancestry.com — and how it changed your life. What was the discovery? Why was it so meaningful? Share your story here.

The New family Tree Maker 2009 Patch
We’ve recently released an update to Family Tree Maker 2009. This new patch includes:

  • Book building – create books compiled from charts, reports and text documents
  • Source templates based on Evidence Explained, by source expert Elizabeth Shown Mills
  • Calendar Reports – they’re back!
  • Extended Family Chart – shows the people in your tree aligned horizontally and organized by generation
  • Improved Ancestry Member Tree integration
  • If users are connected to the internet, Family Tree Maker 2009 will update automatically.

Tana Pederson, author of The Official Guide to Ancestry.com, blogged about a couple of the new changes in this update:

Free Webinars

  • February 24 -- Making a Breakthrough in Your African American Research, 9 PM EDT
    African American research specialist Marjorie Sholes will take you step-by-step through the process she used to trace one of her own ancestors, showing you the tips and tricks she discovered along the way. In particular, she’ll focus on how to identify slave owners to unlock the history of your slave ancestors. You’ll also learn what resources are available on Ancestry.com and elsewhere to aid in your research. You can register by clicking here.
  • Archived Webinar -- Getting Started on Ancestry.com New to Ancestry.com? Come join us for a one-hour webinar where you'll discover the excitement of finding your first family member on a historical record. Plus, learn how Ancestry.com can help you piece together your family story by providing you with more than 27,000 historical databases and innovative family tree building technology. View this webinar by clicking here.

Note: To register for a webinar or view an archived webinar, click on the Learning Center tab on the Ancestry.com home page. Then Keep Learning and, finally, webinars.

Highlights from the Ancestry.com Blog
Here’s what Ancestry.com employees have been talking about on the Ancestry.com blog:

Sunday, February 15, 2009

SPOTLIGHT: Moorshead Publishing

DearREADERS,
In my continuing attempt to explain that most brick and mortar bookstores do not carry a broad variety of genealogy books Ol' Myrt here is going to branch out a bit and include a magazine publisher, who happens to publish a few great book titles. If you are looking for gift ideas for your genealogy friends, any of these offering would surely be welcome.

MOORSHEAD PUBLISHING
www.FamilyChronicle.com
Toll-Free: 1-888-326-2476
Phone: 416-491-3699
Fax: 416-491-3996
US Mail: PO Box 194, Niagara Falls, NY 14304
Canadian/International Mail:
505 Consumers Road, #312, Toronto, ON, M2J 4V8

Initially this publishing company brought us Family Chronicle Magazine. They also pioneered the idea of obtaining a free sample issue, to entice folks to subscribe. Good idea, isn't it? Additional magazines in the lineup include Internet Genealogy Magazine, and a beginners' magazine titled Discovering Family History.

Look to this site for the following additional titles:
Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
http://blog.teachgenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Saturday, February 14, 2009

SPOTLIGHT: Ancestry Publishing

DearREADERS,
In my continuing attempt to explain that most brick and mortar bookstores do not carry a broad variety of genealogy books, let's talk about some books from Ancestry Publishing.

ANCESTRY.COM (publishing division)
http://store.ancestry.com
BASICS:
  • Abbreviations & Acronyms: A Guide for Family Historians (revised 2nd edition)
  • The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy.
  • Hidden Sources: Family History in Unlikely Places
  • Printed Sources: A Guide to Published Genealogical Records
  • US Military Records: A Guide to Federal and State Sources

OTHER

  • BCG Standards Manual
  • Becoming an Accredited Genealogist
  • Chicago and Cook County-- Creating Junior Genealogists
  • Finding Your Canadian Ancestors: A Beginner's Guide
  • Finding Your German Ancestors: A Beginner's Guide
  • Finding Your Irish Ancestors: A Beginner's Guide
  • Finding Your Italian Ancestors: A Beginner's Guide
  • Finding Your Mexican Ancestors: A Beginner's Guide
  • Finding Your Scottish Ancestry: Revised 2nd edition
  • French Canadian Sources
  • Guide to Mormon Family History Sources
  • Irish Records: Sources for Family & Local History
  • Italian Genealogical Records
  • Kentucky Ancestry
  • Plymouth Colony
  • Producing a Quality Family History
  • Researching Your Colonial New England Ancestors
  • The Graveyard Shift: A Family Historian's Guide to NYC Cemeteries
  • They Became Americans: Finding Naturalization Records & Ethnic Origins
  • Unlocking the Secrets in Old Photographs-- Writing the Family Narrative (& workbook)-- Your English Ancestor: A Guide for North Americans
  • Your Family Reunion: How to plan it, Organize it and Enjoy it
  • Your Swedish Roots

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
http://blog.teachgenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Friday, February 13, 2009

SPOTLIGHT: Genealogical Publishing Company

DearREADERS,
AS I mentioned yesterday, most brick and mortar bookstores do not carry a broad variety of genealogy books, so we tend to order them online or purchase them at national or regional genealogy conferences. I’ve had several requests from newbies to explain which online stores are reasonable and trustworthy. Today Ol’ Myrt here wishes to spotlight one of the major booksellers.

GENEALOGICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY
www.Genealogical.com
GPC publishes over 2,000 genealogy books and compact discs featuring colonial genealogy, Irish genealogy, immigration, royal ancestry, family history, and genealogy methods and sources. Genealogical.com is the online home of Genealogical Publishing Company, Clearfield Company, and Gateway Press.

GENERAL reference titles from this publisher include:

-- American Passenger Arrival Records
-- Ancestral Trails: The Complete Guide to British Genealogy & Family History (2nd edition)
-- Carmack's Guide to Copyright & Contracts
-- Evidence! Citation & Analysis for Family Historians
-- Evidence Explained: City History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace
-- Finding our Fathers: A Guidebook to Jewish Genealogy
-- The Great War: A Guide to the Service Records of All the World's Fighting Men and Volunteers
-- Guide to Naturalization Records in the United States
-- The Hidden Half of the Family: A Sourcebook for Women's Genealogy
-- Map Guide to US Federal Censuses 1790-1920
-- Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, writers, editors, lecturers and librarians
-- Reading Early American Handwriting
-- The Researcher's Guide to American Genealogy
-- Ships of our Ancestors (includes photographs & descriptions)
-- QuickSheet: Citing Ancestry.com Databases and Images
-- QuickSheet: Citing Online Historical Resources Evidence! Style 1st revised edition.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Thursday, February 12, 2009

SPOTLIGHT: Heritage Books

DearREADERS,
Most brick and mortar bookstores do not carry a broad variety of genealogy books, so we tend to order them online or purchase them at national or regional genealogy conferences. I’ve had several requests from newbies to explain which online stores are reasonable and trustworthy. Today Ol’ Myrt here wishes to spotlight one of the major booksellers.

HERITAGE BOOKS
www.HeritageBooks.com
HB has a simply marvelous collection of genealogy books, with over 3,000 titles in print. 30% off the regular price of select titles on a first come, first served basis since quantities are limited. Phone orders only: Toll-free: 1-800-876-6103 / Local: (231) 537-4021.

Representative FOREIGN & ETHNIC titles include:
  • Who Were Those Celts?: The German French Swiss Italian Scottish Welsh English Irish American Connection
  • Fragmenta Genealogica (multiple volumes)
  • Visitation of England and Wales Notes (multiple volumes)
  • The Parish Registers of Gulval (Alias Lanisley) in the County of Cornwall [England], 1598-1812
  • Shtetl Finder Gazetteer: Jewish Communities in the 19th and Early 20th Centuries in the Pale
  • The Book of Crests of Scottish-American Clans
  • The Irish Scots and The Scotch-Irish
  • Slave Genealogy: A Research Guide with Case Studies
  • North Carolina General Assembly Sessions Records: Slaves and Free Persons of Color, 1709-1789
  • African American Manumissions of Washington County, Maryland
  • Tripping Over Europe: Expert Advice on Making Travel Easy
  • Seminole Indians of Florida: 1875-1879
  • Mexican-American Genealogical Research: Following the Paper Trail to Mexico
  • Cherokee by Blood: Volume 1, Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U.S. Court of Claims (and subsequent volumes)
  • A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland: Exhibiting the names of the several cities, towns, parish
  • The Cromwellian Settlement of Ireland [1652-1660], Third Edition
  • Germans to America and the Hamburg Passenger Lists: Coordinated Schedules
  • Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan, 1855-1868
  • Welschneureut Church Records, Welschneureut, Germany, 1700-1809

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
www.DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Twitter?

DearREADERS,
OK, I’ll admit it. I am giving in to peer pressure.
It seems everyone in the genea-blogging world is all a-twitter about www.Twitter.com. When Ancestry Insider made his posting about Twitter today, Ol’ Myrt here caved. I am not sure I need another method of social networking since I’m really into Facebook, but I am willing to give it a whirl.

You’d expect folks like Dick Eastman, Illya Daddezio, Randy Seaver and Mark Tucker to Twitter, since a cursory review of the service indicates this is another form of technology for genealogists to play around with. Even RootsMagic is twittering, though there is only one posting showing up so far.

Using Twitter this morning, I have learned about new options at Family Pursuit to upload photos and documents. It’s always good to learn new things, but I could have learned this at Renee’s Genealogy Blog, if I weren’t so behind in reading blogs. [sigh]

Friends like Maven, Megan, Lisa, Schelly and Diane are all twittering, too.

A few such as “Julie Cahill” and “FamilyCurator” have protected their Twitter posts, and require their acceptance of my request to follow their work.

Super achiever genea-friends like Denise at “MoultrieCreek” have 442 posts. Amazing!

Others like Geni are offering mini tech support.

Even venerable institutions such as the Library of Congress are using Twitter to get their message out to the world.

Makes me wonder what I’ve been doing all this time. Guess I’ve been hiding out in Second Life a lot lately.

Before too long, the items below Ol’ Myrt’s signature will be more lengthy than her blog posts.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com
www.DearMYRTLE.com
http://twitter.com/DearMYRTLE

Blogs:
http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
http://blog.TeachGenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.DearMYRTLE.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
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© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com. Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.

Even More READERS' FEEDBACK: Jan and Feb Organization Checklists

From: ginisology007@yahoo.com
DearMYRTLE,

I am new to the Genealogy Blog world, I have a ways to go before I catch up and hopefully can be a good blogger! I am learning! My blog: http://ginisology.blogspot.com - it's a bit dry and new but I am hoping to gain more experience. I work full time and my daughter and two grandchildren live with me, my daughter goes to school at night (she is going for her teaching credentials). I think I get maybe five minutes, (sort of an exaggeration but not far from it!) a week to work on genealogy! I have anxiety attacks about it because I love it so much but not much I can do about it right now so I work and post on my blog as time permits.

About organizing: I have few questions DearMYRTLE, and I am more comfortable asking this way than posting, hope you don't mind. As I said before I have little time to work on things so my highest priority is to get organized. You are an Angel sent to me with the "Checklist" Dear Myrt and I am trying to follow it. Luckily I started with the binder system and love it so it won't be too hard to whip into shape. For me I work better if each ancestor or surname has it's own binder instead mixing them. My great grandmother is a "Jarboe", I have virtually zero paper on her so I am keeping her with the Ijames binder, is that going to work? I am a bit confused about how to handle a few papers and where to file them. I have only been going genealogy for about 1 1/2 years, but I have a ton of paper, I am a paper person and make a lot of notes so there are a lot of papers and I don't know where to file them.

MY QUESTIONS

Half siblings: My mother and father were never married so I have half brothers and my father seems to have been married several times --quite the lover I guess. I never had the opportunity to meet him but I am very close to my Aunt Ginnie, his sister and she has helped me immensely. We only met last April. My half brothers and their info I am guessing go under "Collateral Lines"?

An inherited book: A relative by marriage sent me a complete report (Ancestor/Descendant report) on my father's side all the way back to 1120! She has written several books, she sent me part of one of her books along with the report for the book that I want to put together for that line "Ijames/Eimes". How do I file that? I don't want to break it up but it is pretty detailed with family group sheets, stories, photos, you name it, she really helped me and I am a very blessed lady for having received it from her, she was very generous to share. She had been research the Ijames/Eimes (pronounced "Iams") family for over 30 years. I just don't know how to file it. I thought I should keep it together once I finish my book and just put it all in page protectors but I don't want it to be all over the place.

Other pages: Then I have written or printed lots of "information" type pages, like if I search for something and I would print it out i.e. digital photos and how to scan, or research guides etc., so I may be getting ahead of myself but as I make my to file pile, these papers are in there and I don't want to handle it twice. There's that the old saying, "only handle paper once" or something to that effect.

I love your check list Dear Myrt, and I want to follow it to a T. I know that once I get it handled it will save me time and stress which I have plenty of (lots of stress and little time). I cannot thank you enough for putting your checklist out again, I feel very blessed for being able to be a part of it. I love your blog Dear Myrt, a newbie like me will learn so much from you. I love Genealogy, it's an addiction and passion that I have come to love. I cannot imagine not doing it. I look forward to retirement and doing it as often and as much as I want and learning about my heritage and ancestors. I have taken enough of your time, you are busy, I appreciate your help. Thank you for you.

DearGINI,
All your glowing compliments aside, Ol’ Myrt here is genuinely delighted to meet you and acknowledge your work in the genea-blog arena. Your blog’s stated goal is to “My place to Honor our Ancestors, Memories, History and our lives." The family lines you are researching include IJAMES/EIMES, TABELING, HAF, SAULE, JARBOE, WEBB, EWING”

In my library (I’m calling my computer room the library now!) I keep the other pages in file folders. These are the “how to do it” handouts for my study group members. When I remove a handout from the file to do a class, I can make photocopies. I place my original in a 3-ring binder just for that presentation. After the presentation, I return my handout to the folder, and if I have extra class handouts, I file them there as well. I have a huge lateral file drawer cabinet to handle this. Often I am able to use those handouts for another presentation, but sometimes they all have to be tossed, if the handout needs to be revised.

The inherited book should go right on the shelf with the appropriate surname 3-ring binder. Pick the major one and place it there. Ol’ Myrt here agrees that you cannot tear apart that book, but you might consider making a copy of a page here and there if it is important enough to include in another surname 3-ring binder. My father-in-law Joseph T. Smith compiled a personal history with information about his life, his parents, grandparents, in-laws and children in anecdotal format. I placed it on the shelf next to the Smith 3-ring binders, because it contains his personal recollections, even though it has some stories about his wife’s side of the family.

In the case of the half siblings, you can follow the format I used with my father's families. His first marriage was annulled. He married, had children and later divorced. Then he married my mother and had the three of us children. So when you open the 3-ring binder for my maiden name you’ll find:

  • Family group sheet (dad, mom and me, because I am the youngest in my direct line by that surname) followed by documents and photos.
  • Family group sheet (dad, his previous wife and kids) followed by documents and one photo.
  • Family group sheet (Dad, and his wife whose marriage was annulled.)

So DearGINI, in this case, I inserted smaller red divider tabs, hooked one on the page protector with each family group sheet, and labeled them as follows:

  • Glen - Marriage 3
  • Glen - Marriage 2
  • Glen - Marriage 1 (It is labeled annulled on the family group sheet.)

Glen is my father’s first name.

The next family group sheet is where my father appears as a child in his parent's home. See how the timeline progresses backwards in time and towards the back of the 3-ring binder with the family group sheets and accompanying documents? Makes sense, doesn't it, that the next family group sheet would be the one where my father's father is a little boy on HIS father's family group sheet?

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.
Myrt@DearMYRTLE.com

Blogs:
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com
http://blog.teachgenealogy.com

Podcasts:
DearMYRTLE’s Family History Hour
http://podcasts.dearmyrtle.com

Family History Expos Genealogy Podcasts
http://fhexpos.libsyn.com

DearMYRTLE's Facebook® Group Message Board
http://www.new.facebook.com/board.php?uid=2960625373
© 2009 Pat Richley All Rights Reserved.

This and previous blog entries are fully searchable by going to http://blog.dearmyrtle.com . Myrt welcomes queries and research challenges, but regrets she is unable to answer each personally.