Saturday, March 31, 2012

1940 Census: Cram Course Step 3

DearREADERS,
Still busy preparing for Monday's release the 1940 Census on April 2, 2012? It will be available for online searching free of charge at  http://1940census.archives.gov. Be sure to join the webinar sessions next week to SHARE what you discover once the images go live. If you are still cramming to prepare... 

NARA RECOMMENDS
Identify the enumeration district (ED) in which each address was located
. There are currently several ways to do this:

Search the 1940 Census Maps for Enumeration District Numbers

  • Go to the Online Public Access search (OPA): http://www.archives.gov/research/search/
  • Enter 1940 Census maps + the county + the state: 1940 Census maps Sussex Delaware [for example]. You can narrow the search by including a town name in the search: 1940 Census maps Sussex Milford Delaware
  • Note: Not all towns will have individual maps. You may need to look at county maps for some towns.
  • The search will bring back any matching results. The first three results will be listed, to see additional results click "View all Online Holdings."
  • Click the particular result you wish to see to view the larger version of the map.
  • You may use the zoom and pan features to enlarge the map and move the image on the screen.
  • If you have the address of an ancestor from 1940, find the address on the map and then look for the enumeration district number for that address. The map may have many other numbers on it. The ED number may be a two part number separated by a hyphen (in the red box below). The first number represents the county number and the second number the number of the enumeration district within that county.
  • Save the enumeration district numbers for the opening of the 1940 Census on April 2, 2012. You will be able to search the digitized copies of the Census by ED number and then browse for your family members' Census entry.

Search the 1940 Census Enumeration District Descriptions

  • Go to the Online Public Access search (OPA): at http://www.archives.gov/research/search/
  • Enter 1940 Census enumeration district descriptions + the county + the state: 1940 Census enumeration district descriptions Sussex Delaware
  • You can narrow the search by including a town name in the search: 1940 Census enumeration district descriptions Sussex Delaware
  • In the search results, click on the title of the description to see the full description.

Use the Search Utilities at http://stevemorse.org/census/.

These utilities are useful tools to search for 1940 EDs from addresses or locations as well as to convert a 1930 Census ED to a 1940 Census ED.



OL' MYRT SUGGESTS
Read my cousin Russ Worthington's 1940 Census Preparation - Identify ED's

See Connie Potter on the 1940 Census


Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.  

1 comment:

  1. Just to add to this, so there are no surprises.
    "The ED number may be a two part number separated by a hyphen (in the red box below). The first number represents the county number and the second number the number of the enumeration district within that county."

    In large cities like Los Angeles and New York (Manhattan) the maps dropped the prefix from the ED #, so the ED number may look like any other on the map. Los Angeles has **5** different districts shown on the map, and the way they told the difference between them was by color. Unfortunately, the maps you will see were filmed in black and white. And..... 85 cities in 1940 have a different prefix in their two part ED number than the county they are in. That is different than the 1930 census when everything within a county had the same prefix number. If you use the map strategy, be prepared to go through a number of them. For example, Chicago has 129 ED maps which are unindexed.

    Joel Weintraub
    Dana Point, CA
    https://sites.google.com/site/census1940

    ReplyDelete