Thursday, January 24, 2013

The Flowering of the Maryland Palatinate


From: Pamela 
DearMYRTLE,
I'm the one with the question from your Mondays With Myrt webinar session yesterday morning and you were going to give me the name of a book about Maryland history.  I may already have read it, but I'd like to know what you recommend. I couldn't go into all the research I have completed on this family, but let me summarize more of what I know,

Maurice Baker settled in Anne Arundel Co., MD and in his later years became a Quaker. There's some discussion among the Bakers my uncle has worked with that the Quaker influence stayed with the family even when there was little or no evidence of their continued practice. One branch of the family did stay in MD, another went to VA, and a third went to North Carolina. 

In Kentucky, a Charles Baker shows up in Pulaski Co. a few years after my Jehu Baker had settled. Charles' descendant did the DNA testing and had a perfect 64-point match to my uncle, but he had no Jehu in his line. He hasn't willingly corresponded with me and my uncle has shared nothing revealing about Charles came from. No land records or other court records indicate where Jehu came from in either Pulaski or Lincoln Counties in Kentucky. This was truly wilderness, so if such records did exist, nothing remains of them, to my knowledge. BTW, my uncle still lives in Kentucky and has personally gone through all the known records for both counties in search of this illusive fellow.

I will appreciate any pointers you may share to get me moving. Thank you.

Dear Pamela,
You mentioned your suspected ancestors were in Maryland by the mid-1600s, and I'm not sure I can help you specifically, but it can give you background on a group of early settlers.

The book I had in mind during Mondays with Myrt yesterday is The Flowering of the Maryland Palatinate: An intimate and objective history of the Province of Maryland to the overthrow of Proprietary rule in 1654, with accounts of Lord Baltimore's settlement at Avalon by Harry Wright Newman. The book was originally published in Washington, DC in 1961 by Genealogical Publishing Company in 1984, 1985. Now the reprint is available from Clearfield Company, a subsidiary of GPC. From the publisher's book description we read:


"The actual settlement of the Province of Maryland in 1634 was undertaken by Leonard Calvert, Lord Baltimore's second son, and the group of 200 adventurers who accompanied him on the Ark and the Dove. In addition to a succinct history of the Calvert family and the area in which they flourished in England, this work describes the life and times of the 200 passengers, their part in the founding and settlement of the colony, and the development of the feudal manorial system.
In addition to a succinct history of the Calvert family and the milieu in which they flourished in England, The Flowering of the Maryland Palatinate describes the lives and times of the 200 adventurers who participated in the original expedition to Maryland, their part in the founding and settlement of the colony, and the development of colonial Maryland's distinctive manorial system.
The bulk of this volume, of course, consists of biographical and genealogical sketches of the 200 adventurers, each developed in meticulous detail from surviving documents by the famous Maryland genealogist, Harry Wright Newman. From contemporary court records, letters, and miscellaneous papers, Mr. Newman has wrought a definitive history of these early Marylanders and has accomplished, single-handedly, for the passengers of the Ark and the Dove, what has taken a legion of researchers to do for the passengers of the Mayflower."

Happy family tree climbing!

Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
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1 comment:

  1. Dear MYRTLE,

    There is a website that maybe of interest:

    http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mdkyre/

    It is what I was thinking about when Pamela brought it up on Monday.

    Russ

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