Thursday, January 31, 2013

FamilySearch and OCLC's mega catalog plans

DearREADERS,
How about taking the catalog of the world's largest genealogy library and add that to OCLC, the collection of 74,000 library catalogs from 70+ countries, and you've got the best thing for family historians since the invention of the Internet. Well, that's just what was announced today:


OCLC and FamilySearch partnership will combine resources for richer genealogy research experience




"This combination of genealogical and bibliographic resources will be of enormous benefit to librarians and library users as well as genealogists," said Jay Jordan, OCLC President and CEO. "OCLC and FamilySearch are organizations with similar goals—to connect people to knowledge and information through cooperation. We look forward to working with FamilySearch." 
 Source: http://www.oclc.org/us/en/news/releases/2013/20135.htm

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE





Getting published - Erica did it!

DearREADERS,
One of our Mondays with Myrt regulars, Erica, has accomplished what most genealogists plan to do eventually -- publish a family history. Interestingly she has chosen Lulu.com as her publisher. This is a trustworthy "print on demand" publisher, meaning the book you order is printed immediately after someone orders order it. That saves Erica from purchasing a large inventory and distributing the books herself. Using Lulu.com, Erica can readily add the option for this book to be available in digital format. It's just a click of the mouse.

The other significant point about Erica's project is that it isn't a comprehensive family history, but focuses on one portion of her grandfather's life. Erica writes "I got to thinking you'd probably like an update on the Christmas present I made for my family this year. Last year was the quilt book, this year is a book on the Bulls Bridge Power Plant (including my grandfather's 1912 photos) and Dakin family history."


Ol’ Myrt here likes the idea of breaking down the family history writing project into manageable “books”.

IMAGE: Page 8 from Erica's book.



Wonderful accomplishment, Erica. 

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

FamilySearch: A picture speaks a 1,000 words

PHOTO: (c) Pat Richley-Erickson
For further reading: Feedback: FamilySearch's Potential




Feedback: FamilySearch's Potential


DearREADERS,
The Potential of FamilySearch.org post by James Tanner in the Genealogy's Star Blog opens with "I wonder if FamilySearch really understands the potential of FamilySearch.org? They seem to be moving towards putting the pieces together, but I have yet to hear anyone articulate the website's true potential in a coherent fashion. The closest presentation yet was from Tim Cross at the Arizona Family History Expo. He gave a presentation on FamilySearch.org/Photos and talked about storing photos, stories and documents along with the entries on Family Tree. But there seems to be one more step; making FamilySearch.org the "master copy" of the world's genealogy.

Ol'Myrt here has a similar question, but it's not about the "tree" portion of the website. It's the "search" option that continues to bother me.

FamilySearch is missing the fact that to encourage searching for an ancestor by name is a poor option, when last August less than 11% of the FamilySearch digital images were indexed[1]. With several million new images being uploaded weekly by digital imaging crews staged throughout the world, that percentage can only be worse by now. Indexing just cannot keep pace with digitial imaging. 
  • FamilySearch isn't doing enough to point to the vast collection of UNindexed records.
  • The concept of one big online family tree, with attached supporting documents is all well and good. But if folks cannot locate supporting documents to attach to ancestors, the reliability of info in FamilySearch's one big online family tree is up for grabs.



CASE IN POINT
The redesigned main screen of FamilySearch.org looks beautiful. But the main focus remains the "search by name" fill-in-the-blank form. Note: In the screen shot below, the search takes up about 3/4 of the "above the fold" on the FamilySearch landing page. A larger footprint denotes a higher priority.

One may specify the time period and place of an event such as birth, marriage and death, but the search algorithm appears to ignore it. The FamilySearch search algorithm is reminiscent of Ancestry.com’s search engine issues from about 6 years ago.



Here are the results of my search for Dolly Yockey. No viable hits, and no suggestions for further use of the website. Major fail.


Even when choosing to change the filter of the results, there are no suggestions other than census. I know I searched by name, but why is Kansas coming up when I specified her death was in Illinois? And what about a 1900 census, when she died in 1858? Then there's the concern that surely there are more FamilySearch digital images for Illinois than census records? This is a real dead end.


This could lead one to think there are no Illinois records covering the time period 1858 in the vast FamilySearch.org digital image collection. Yet a browse of United States - Illinois records shows there is much to search, though most not indexed. There is no link from the screen above to get to the list of all Illinois record collections. 

GETTING TO FAMILYSEARCH BROWSABLE IMAGES
Certainly one doesn't get to the unindexed by sidebar suggestions after an unsuccessful search. One must manually go "all the way out" to FamilySearch.org. Then scroll down past the search boxes to find the "Browse by Location" option. 



Here one clicks "United States" then selects "Illinois" to find 21 sizable collections to date. Browse-only images are indicated by the tiny "camera" icon. Here I might choose to browse the images of  "Illinnois, Cemetery Transctiptions 1851-2009" since my ancestor died in 1858. Without stronger pointers to the locality-related databases, an inexperienced FamilySearch.org website visitor would never know about these record groups by searching the site by an ancestor's name.


SUMMARY
FamilySearch.org hides much of it’s digital content with the over-emphasis on ancestor name search when admittedly the vast majority of the site's digital images are only browsable, meaning the images have not yet been indexed and cannot show up in a name search.

FamilySearch is completely missing the opportunity to teach researchers about alternatives by providing side bar links to related browsable digital images, by time period and general locality. This disconnect must be a priority to resolve if FamilySearch wants to reach its potential.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  




[1] Info provided via telephone conversation with Jim Ericson, then a FamilySearch employee.

LegacyFamilyTree: It's not just about software anymore

DearREADERS,
We've come to know and love Legacy Family Tree as a genealogy management system for Windows computers. But Geoff Rasmussen has taken that company to a whole new level -- educating genealogists about good research tools and methods through Legacy's popular webinars.


Here’s the info on  Legacy’s 2013 webinar series and links to other places Geoff will be posting reminders on these exciting events:

IMAGE: From the Legacy Webinar Brochure


Join Ol' Myrt for my Legacy webinars:



Blogs: Easy-to-Make Web Pages by DearMYRTLE and Carrie Keele. 3/8
Honor ancestors by creating blog posts -- a place on the web that anyone can find using simple search engine techniques. Learn how to cut costs of printing & snail-mailing your family newsletter, and find out how to reach beyond your current membership circle. Carrie demos setting up a blog in three easy steps. Myrt analyzes a printed newsletter and demos how to turn it into a blog. Includes info on setting up a Google Calendar that several members can update, and how to convert your blog into a genealogy book.


Blogging for Beginners with DearMYRTLE. 5/3Step-by-step approach to creating a blog, and making postings using the free service at Blogger.com. A great way to share genealogy research, post your society's newsletter, share info with extended family members. The webinar will also feature a survey of sample blogs, and links for additional help.

Topics include:
- What is a blog?
- Creating a blog in three steps
- Creating posts (articles)
- Genealogy blogs
- How does a blog work?
- Reading blogs with Google Reader
- Blogger's dashboard
- How to add an image
- Schedule blog postings
- Using draft mode
- Advanced settings
- How to get help
- Advice for professionals


More Blogging for Beginners with DearMYRTLE. 9/6Continuing the discussion about free online software at Blogger.com to get your message out to the world. This sessions topics include adding gadgets such as links to other websites, adding book suggestions from Amazon.com, removing the blogger search bar and inserting a Google Search box to make it easier for your readers to find previous postings.

Topics include:
- Disclosure statements: why you need one
- How to add a page (tab)
- Design and layout tips
- Add a graphic
- Add the Google Search box.
- Add Amazon. Affiliate links within a blog.
- Print-friendly buttons
- Backing up your blog
- Removing the Blogger navbar
- Q & A

 Ancestry Trees Can Jump Start Your Research by DearMYRTLE. 11/1Find out why Ol' Myrt gave up the notion to avoid sharing her family tree online. Secret: It's all about collaboration. This webinar guides participants through the process of creating a GEDCOM file in the Legacy Family Tree software, uploading the file to Ancestry.com, and looking for "reasonable" matches using Ancestry's shaking leaf. We then focus on deeper searches using  the "magnifying glass" and analysis of reliability of matches.

Topics include:
- GEDCOM - Privacy issues with living individuals
- Ancestry Member Trees privacy options
- Changing views
- Editing profiles
- Ancestry.com's shaky leaf
- Accepting an Ancestry.com suggestion
- Reviewing another Ancestry Member Tree
- Communicating with other researchers


Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

iMac for Genealogists: Ellen's view

DearREADERS,
Thank-you to Ellen who writes to explain some of what Mr. Myrt can expect when his HP laptop dies and he gets the iMac he is dreaming about.


"That was a fantastic Mondays with Myrt webinar this week.  I like the problem solving part.  I also enjoyed exploring the different websites. 

Regarding iMac.  For Mac genealogy software, I like the Reunion.  It has more features than some.  I’m using Parallels to run Legacy and have the Legacy database in Dropbox.  I can use either my Win 7 laptop or the IMAC to access my data.  

I like taking advantage of the stability of the Mac OS.  When you download the Parallels software, you can also download Windows operating system, too. With Parallels, you can use the Filefinder features to manage the files, and only need to install the Dropbox in the Mac OS.  I would suggest maxing the memory on the Mac to speed things up.  

I love my iMac.  I’ve had fewer problems with it than my Windows laptop.  I know Russ uses the Boot Camp to run Windows programs. 



Visit the website to learn more:
http://www.leisterpro.com
Oh, a good gift for Mr. Myrt would be AA batteries. The mouse uses 2 and the keyboard uses 3.  The batteries last longer than with my PC mouse.

I’m not a whiz with the IMAC but it is easy to learn.  If Mr. Myrt gets the intellimouse instead of the pad, he can modify the settings to allow for a right click.  Otherwise he would need to hold the control key down and click.

Keyboard shortcuts use the command key instead of ctrl.  For example, command plus the “P” brings up the print function.,

Mr Myrt may want to get a sample data base and try Mac Family Tree.  It is supposed to work with FamilySearch.org."

Thank-you DearELLEN for taking the time to share your experiences migrating from a Windows computer to a Mac. We all get by with a little help from our GeneaFriends.


Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

Hmmm... ReelGenie comes into the spotlight on the world stage

DearREADERS,

News this morning from Thomas MacEntee (GeneaBloggers, HiDef Genealogy) about a genealogy-oriented entity gaining acclaim in main stream circles:

"Big news for my client ReelGenie – I don’t know if a family history related app/website has ever been selected for the South By Southwest (SXSW) festival in Austin, TX before!

ReelGenie will have a big presence at RootsTech and by then we’ll know if we won the competition.  We’re just stoked that we are one of 8 finalists from over 500 companies who entered." See: http://www.prweb.com/releases/reelgenie/sxsw/prweb10363470.htm 

Ol' Myrt here first heard about ReelGenie from Thomas when we spoke in person a few months ago. I love the concept of drag and drop video creations using your photos, adding your stories and who knows what else. The site still isn't open, but you can register your email address to be among the first to know about the official launch.

FOR FURTHER READING


Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

FindMyPast: Extending TV episodes to U.S. Viewers

DearREADERS,
From Josh Reed at FindMyPast.com comes more info about the Find My Past TV Show for US viewers. Josh writes:


"Tune in to findmypast.com to view episodes from the hit UK television show, Find My Past, now entering its second season. Each episode links living individuals to real historical events found in their family tree. Findmypast.com is the only place in the US where you can watch this show!"




Josh explains:
"Register on findmypast.com for free and watch Find My Past episodes that aired in the last 30 days at no cost. Missed an episode or want to watch your favorites again? Findmypast subscribers can watch the all episodes for an unlimited time. Every episode will be available to watch on findmypast.com a week after it airs.Register now!

Find My Past the TV show is an exciting series which unites ordinary members of the public with their ancestors.
Each week in the new 10-part series, we reveal how three people are related to someone from a significant historical event by searching the ancestry records on findmypast. We follow their journey as each person discovers which of their ancestors played a role in modern history.

At the end of every episode, we unite the participants and reveal how each person's family history is connected to monumental world history– such as the sinking of the Titanic, the WWI Christmas Truce, and the Great Fire of London.

Hosted by Chris Hollins of BBC Breakfast, Watchdog and winner of Strictly Come Dancing 2009, the hit UK Television series is now available for the first time to watch online, exclusive to findmypast registered users. The remaining five episodes will be shown after Christmas."


Thank-you to Find My Past for extending the reach of these BBC broadcasts to the US market.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

RootsMagic6: Changing CAPS Preference after Setup

DearREADERS,
Dee's follow up question is "Can you change the program to display surnames in all CAPS after you've already set up the program." 

Yes, DearDEE. In RootsMagic6, click the TOOLS on the menu bar, and select FILE OPTIONS from the drop down menu. You'll then see this screen, to make your adjustments. A check-mark indicates the option is turned on.



Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.


Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

Surname in CAPS and Missing Maiden Names

DearREADERS,
Some great questions from my friend Dee who writes to inquire:

DearMYRTLE,

I have just migrated to Roots Magic 6, and am setting up my database. Now I realize a lot of this is personal choice but have to ask:

  1. Is there a benefit to having surnames in all CAPS?
    MYRT:
    I suggest permitting the software program to insert CAPS for the surnames, just from a readability standpoint. These ol' bi-focals provide challenges to this ol' gal sometimes. I wouldn't type the surname in caps because you don't always want them to show up that way in a report.
  2. How do you suggest entering females whose last names you do not know? I dislike leaving the line blank bur don’t want to have the husband’s surname listed there either.  UNK is an option but is it a good one?
    MYRT:
    Simply insert the name as you know it, and don't worry about the maiden name until it is determined. You won't mind the blank line in printed reports, as this may encourage folks to write in the correct info.

    Using the husband's surname is definitely out, even though the woman is known by that name during her married years. It will totally skew things if, for instance, you have a Mary Jones marrying a Thomas Jones, where Jones is indeed Mary's maiden name. You want that "surname" field to reflect the woman's maiden name. Leaving it blank means it is unknown at this time.

Regardless of your "genealogy management program" these points will help in data entry. If you are having challenges choosing software, may I suggest:

FOR FURTHER READING



Happy family tree climbing!

Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

RootsTech 2013 Ancestor Spotlight Contest

DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt here wishes to encourage my DearREADERS to stop researching long enough to exercise writing skills to tell the stories of just one of your ancestors. The brief write-up you create for this contest can be a model for future "shares" with your extended family members. After the contest, keep writing one story each week. By the end of the year, you would have quite a collection of ancestral stories, undoubtably more than you shared last year.

So what's up with the contest? Well, the winner will receive free admission to RootsTech 2013. Here's the plan:

SHARE AN ANCESTOR SPOTLIGHT

1. Write a minimum two paragraph story about your ancestor or an ancestor's possession.

2. After the story include identifying info as follows:

  • * Name
  • * Birthdate and location
  • * Death date and location
  • * Next of kin
  • * Explain how you heard the story or from whom you obtained access to the ancestor's artifact.


3. Include a graphic. If it is the story of an ancestor's experience as a bootlegger, but you don't have a picture of him, you might include a public domain picture of a still, say at WikiPedia.com. You could draw and scan your own sketch of a still. You might use a davidrumsey.com map to show where the event took place, and to trace your ancestor's escape route when those darned government revenuers were in the neighborhood  You might include a newspaper clipping reporting your ancestor's wild escapades, or a copy of several pages from the criminal case indictment.

4. Get creative. Wax poetic. Use flowery language, if that's how your ancestor spoke. This is how you make genealogy interesting to the non-genealogist in the family. No need to embelish the story, just have fun telling it. It is sort of like the printed Redbook Magazine's story "complete on these two pages."

5. Publish the story in your blog or as a public Google doc.

6. Include the URL to your post or public Google doc as a comment to this blog. Entries will not be accepted via email, Facebook or other outlets. Your original contest entry  must be in your blog or on a public Google doc.

7. All participants agree to freely permit DearMYRTLE to quote part or all of their ancestor stories and include copies of photos and/or other graphics used in your contest entry post in her blog.

8. The winner will be announced during the 11th February 2013 Mondays With Myrt Webinar. You need not be present to win.

NOTE: Entries will be judged on creativity and attention to detail. The decision of the judges is purely arbitrary and is final. The winner will be notified by a post in DearMYRTLE's Genealogy Blog and is subsequently required to submit his name, valid email address and telephone number, so tthe winning entry can be processed by FamilySearch.org who has provided this promotional item for use in this contest to DearMYRTLE in my capacity as a 2013 Official RootsTech Blogger.


Good luck, my DearREADERS. Have fun writing about your ancestors.

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

Sunday, January 27, 2013

Myrt's online genealogy meetings this week

DearREADERS,
OK, Downton is over, and I can get back to the topic of "genealogy." This week is shaping up nicely with the following online genealogy meetings for Ol' Myrt. I sure hope to "see" you, if you get a chance to break away from other pursuits. The commute is an easy one! It's only as far as your computer keyboard. Turn up those speakers, and let's have fun discussing our favorite subject.




MONDAYS WITH MYRT 

A newsy, "Across Myrt's Desk" sort of workshop webinar, exploring all types of genealogy research techniques, challenges, technology and such. Mondays with Myrt is about working together to get around those brick walls, sharing what we’ve learned in a relaxed format.


BE READY WITH A PARAGRAPH OR TWO: If you'd like to have us consider your research challenge in the PROBLEM SOLVING segment of Monday's webinar.

WHEN:
Noon Eastern US
11 am Central US
10am Mountain US
9am Pacific US

If you need a time zone converter see:
http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

REGISTER:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/789754392







WHAT'S EVIDENTIA? - A DearMYRTLE Workshop Webinar
Popular interest in a "workspace" for analysis and correlation of multiple documents has been sparked by the arrival of the new Evidentia software reportedly 'supports research by guiding you through the Genealogical Proof Standard, the standard by which acceptable genealogical conclusions are judged.' See: http://evidentia.ed4becky.net

Find out more about the webinar at:http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2013/01/whats-evidentia-attend-mondays-webinar.html
WHEN:
Register once to attend one or both Monday night sessions: 
Jan 28, 2013
Feb 4, 2013 

9pm Eastern US 
8pm Central US 
7pm Mountain US 
6pm Pacific US 

Register now at:
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/209858473

JUST GENEALOGY IN SECOND LIFE

It's one of those rare 5th Tuesdays. WHAT shall we make of it? Let's have a GeneaGame, with prizes galore! What say ye?

COME wearing your 1940 Eisenhower Jacket. If you need one, visit the Clothing Shoppe down the steps from the Just Genealogy Welcome Plaza. But I am sure Sherlock and Dee Dee can share one with you, too!

WHEN: Tuesday 29 January 2013

9pm Eastern US 
8pm Central US 
7pm Mountain US 
6pm Pacific US

JUST GENEALOGY FIRE PIT AREA:
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Wollah/76/70/70

HOST: Clarise Beaumont (in-world)


Happy family tree climbing!

Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

Follow-up on Picasa and GeeksOnTour

DearREADERS,
There's a lot of buzz about the photo organizing, editing and sharing program Picasa, provided free by Google. GeneaFriend Becky Jamison reminded me of a great web resource for learning about all sorts of tech topics including Picasa, by a wonderful team called GeeksOnTour. Here's the link to the library of online videos about Picasa: http://geeksontour.tv/learning-library/picasa

CONTEXT
Remember, our Picasa Facial Recognition webinar is coming up on 11 February? By then Ol' Myrt here plans to have reviewed all the Picasa videos at GeeksOnTour located at www.GeeksOnTour.tv. Yes, you have to join this service. It's $58 a year. If I were to take a full-fledged Picasa class at my local community college, you can bet it would cost more. But with the $58 annual fee at GeeksOnTour, I have access to notonly all the Picasa classes but to 190 other videos on other topics of interest to genealogists such as Google Maps, Blogger, Droid Smartphones, Facebook, and the basics of Windows.

WHO ARE THE GEEKS?
Between them, Chris Guld and her husband Jim are certified instructors specializing in topics such as Microsoft, network administration, web design and building, and RVing. Way back in 2003 they started with a dream. Along the way they picked up acknowledgement from subscribers and from high-powered type like Forbes.com. See: Running a Subscription Website from the Road by David F. Carr.

GeeksOnTour has a blog, where Chris writes a Picasa post each week, and this is the link to the top 2012 Picasa blog posts. http://geeksontour.tv/2012/12/our-top-ten-picasa-articles-of-2012



In fact Ol' Myrt here thinks you will like GeeksOnTour so well, that you'll want to add the blog to your Google Reader. Here's the URL: http://geeksontour.tv/category/blog

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

WEBINAR: Facial Recognition and Ancestor Photos

DearREADERS,
Let's explore Picasa's facial recognition option called "People" with Darlene Steffens. We'll learn how the software mines through all files and folders to pick up familiar faces for your to name and categorize with special attention to Picasa's web-based help.




All DearMYRTLE Workshop Webinars (c) feature a little bit of PowerPoint and a lot of demos.

Title: Facial Recognition and Ancestor Photos DearMYRTLE Workshop Webinar
Date: Monday, February 11, 2013
Time:

9pm Eastern US 
8pm Central US 
7pm Mountain US 
6pm Pacific US 

If you need a time zone converter, there is a great one located here:
http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

REGISTRATION
https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/620496576

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Mac®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer

Mobile attendees
Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet


Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

Saturday, January 26, 2013

Ancestry.com and social media

DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt here was surprised to pick up via Zite that Ancestry.com has a high-powered social media guru. See: Executive Insight: Ancestry.com posted by Nick Johnson 23 January 2013 on the Useful Social Media Blog.



I cross-posted the link to the blog post on my DearMYRTLE Facebook page, and stated "If he's Ancestry's social media guru, and he hasn't reached out to me, does this mean I've lost my edge, impact and reach? (Sigh)" 

Here's how the comments went - no editing. Just the facts, though I have highlighted the quote from the article in red below.


  • Russ Worthington 150,000 end users involved, and you aren't one of them ??
    2 hours ago via mobile · Like
  • Pat Richley-Erickson R U, Russ Worthington? I receive emails periodically from Ancestry's marketing department. But I've never heard of a bi-weekly contact from anyone else at Ancestry.
    38 minutes ago · Like · 1
  • Pat Richley-Erickson "We initially reached out to our user base to identify which of our users was more socially enabled. We got close to a million responses from our first request, and from those, we identified about 150,000 people whom we launched the program with. These people are prolific sharers, and prolific content creators. These are the personality traits of an advocate that we really want to build upon.
    Since the program started running lat April 2012, we send out a bi-weekly emails that gives these people advanced information about what is happening on Ancestry. It’s like a VIP program that gives these advocates materials they can disseminate to their followers. We give them a lot of promotions they can give away on their blogs, we also gave them a badge and a widget they can embed in their blog to give us a high number of back links to our site. We’re also trying out more specific stuff for these users including Google+ like hangouts and VIP video material that is just for these users."
  • Pat Richley-Erickson Apparently this has hit a nerve. My DearREADERS would like freebies!
    36 minutes ago · Like · 1
  • Pat Richley-Erickson Maybe Anne Gillespie Mitchell will mention this to Nick?
  • Caroline Marshall Pointer I get their email newsletter is that what they're referring to? Otherwise, Ancestry's presence on social media could be better. FB isn't a good medium anymore because of EdgeRank. I have to search Ancestry out on the different networks (not Crista or Anne because they have a presence), but the company itself. It should *dominate* on Twitter and elsewhere but it doesn't. So this article was surprising.
  • Pat Richley-Erickson I agree they should dominate on Twitter. Christa and Anne will get my message thru to Nick. These gals have a presence that transcends anything Ancestry would do for them. THEY get social networking. Ancestry doesn't.
    24 minutes ago via mobile · Like · 1
  • Pat Richley-Erickson ... apparently not the only nite owl tonight!
    22 minutes ago via mobile · Like · 1
  • Caroline Marshall Pointer Well, I fell asleep earlier and woke up at 2:30. Wide awake now. 
    21 minutes ago via mobile · Unlike · 1
  • Russ Worthington Crista and Anne are on Social Media, Twitter Chats, YouTube, but I hadn't seen the social Media guru. He maybe behind what we are seeing, but I think Crista and Anne were doing their thing before October
    19 minutes ago · Like · 1
  • Russ Worthington Also, Ancestry has more Social Media "tools" on their website, that hadn't been there before, but don't remember when they first appeared, but it's been a while
  • Pat Richley-Erickson Those user-driven social media sharing tools are a passive approach. Ancestry needs to be proactive, not taking the cheapie way out by just relying on the freebie promotions bloggers with followers might provide. With so many new databases going live each day, they should have an employee that does nothing but spotlighting specific images from each set so folks can "see" what that type of record holds.
  • Pat Richley-Erickson And you know if a non-member clicks to view the next image they are politely encouraged to sign up for the service!
  • Caroline Marshall Pointer Yes, they've integrated SM tools into their website nicely for their users, but Ancestry (the company) is utilizing FB too much. Also, I can't keep up with the Twitter chats. I'd like to see them use a different medium for 'helping' customers.
  • Caroline Marshall Pointer I agree with Pat...very passive.
  • Pat Richley-Erickson Ok, I'm getting up to blog about this! 'Nuff of this iPad browsing and commenting.
  • Pat Richley-Erickson May I quote you two?
    10 minutes ago · Like · 1
  • Caroline Marshall Pointer I do think their email newsletters are incredibly helpful. Do they e courage sign ups of those? They should on all their social networks.

    And I like your idea of images, Pat. They FAR outdo their (paid subscription) competition on overall records and ease of use. An image-driven social media campaign across their social networks would be very beneficial, IMO.


So, I wonder IF Ancestry.com is listening, now that Tony Macklin, one of their best programmers, has left?

Ancestry.com has rich content, but they aren't letting folks know about it aggressively enough. Me thinks Ancestry got way-laid, thinking about national advertising during the sponsorship of WDYTYA NBC broadcasts. Well, that was then. This is now. Hire a social networking guru or two who can manage a good Twitter feed, spice it up with a new document image every hour or so. And then actually relate to potential users using this and other social media networks. You've got the potential with over 25,000 BYU college students nearby. Surely they will know how to build interest among a whole new set of potential members.

[Setting aside my riding crop, stepping down off my soap box, and demurely resetting the netting on my hat.]

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
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