Sunday, May 24, 2015

GeneaWebinars Calendar: Online hangouts, webinars and chats this coming week

DearREADERS,
Thanks to the centralized calendar at GeneaWebinars.com, genealogists interested in learning more about our craft may register for these online seminars coming up this week. Be sure to verify the time in your neck of the woods. If you need a time zone converter see: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

This centralized calendar provides information about how to attend genealogy-related online meetings, classes, hangouts, seminars and webinars, where there is a visual slide share and/or website or software demo for attendees to view.

Hosts may use a variety of platforms including Adobe Connect, AnyMeeting, Captera, Google Hangouts on Air, GoToMeeting, GoToWebinar, Live Meeting, Skype, Web-Ex, and Wiggio, to name a few.

There are currently over 40 hosts with posting access to this calendar and blog, and over 200 hours of scheduled instruction for genealogists wishing to hone their research skills during the coming year. 


AMAZING!




Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Hangouts: http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE




Sunday, May 17, 2015

Online genealogy hangouts, webinars and chats this coming week

DearREADERS,
Thanks to the centralized calendar at GeneaWebinars.com, genealogists interested in learning more about our craft may register for these online seminars coming up this week. Be sure to verify the time in your neck of the woods. If you need a time zone converter see: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

This centralized calendar provides information about how to attend genealogy-related online meetings, classes, hangouts, seminars and webinars, where there is a visual slide share and/or website or software demo for attendees to view.

Hosts may use a variety of platforms including Adobe Connect, AnyMeeting, Captera, Google Hangouts on Air, GoToMeeting, GoToWebinar, Live Meeting, Skype, Web-Ex, and Wiggio, to name a few.

There are currently over 40 hosts with posting access to this calendar and blog, and over 200 hours of scheduled instruction for genealogists wishing to hone their research skills during the coming year. 


AMAZING!




Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Hangouts: http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE




Friday, May 15, 2015

FindMyPast: Dublin Workhouses, Newspapers and more

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at FindMyPast.com.



This week’s Findmypast Friday marks the release of over 2.5 million fascinating Dublin Workhouse records that highlight the devastating impact the great famine had on Irish society. This week’s additions also include baptism and burial records from the English county of Nottinghamshire, birth, marriage and death Index records from Australia’s Northern Territory and millions of historic British newspaper articles.
Dublin Workhouses Records
Containing over 1.5 million records, the Dublin Workhouses Admission & Discharge Registers 1840-1919 list the details of those who passed through the workhouses of the North and South Dublin Unions. Levels of poverty in Ireland were far higher than in England and the workhouse was often an inescapable part of life that would have touched many, if not most Dublin families. The North and South Dublin Unions were among the busiest in Ireland, not simply because they were in the capital but because they often took in paupers from across the country. This was especially true during the years of the Great Famine in the 1840s when crowds of desperate, starving people came to Dublin from all over the country. Given the lack of 19th century census material in Ireland, the registers will be an incredibly valuable resource to those with Irish ancestors. Dublin was the largest point of embarkation from Ireland during the 19th century era of mass Catholic migration and a significant number of those who emigrated would have passed through these workhouses.   

Each record includes a transcript and an image of the original document. Entries list arrivals at the workhouse with details of their age, occupation, religion, any illnesses or infirmities, other family members, original parish and condition when they arrived (usually describing clothes or cleanliness).
Containing nearly 900,000 records, the Dublin Poor Law Unions Board of Guardians Minute Books from the National Archives of Ireland contain fascinating records of meetings held by the Board of Guardians of four Dublin workhouses. The Board of Guardians oversaw the running of the poor law unions as well as the hiring of teachers, staff and contractors. Guardians were elected by those who paid the taxes that funded poor law relief.

Each record contains a transcript and an image of the original handwritten minutes. The amount of information contained in the image can be considerable. The minute books recorded what was said at each meeting of the Board of Guardians, including correspondence and contracts but also individual cases that came before the Board. These include the day-to-day running of the workhouses, disciplinary matters concerning both staff and inmates, individual case histories, foundling children’s fostering and upkeep and the hiring of foster mothers and wet nurses. Later minute books follow a strict format to ensure that suitable care was taken about health provisions and deserted children. For the poor the Union provided the only social security available, as without a public health system, the workhouse hospitals were often the only health care that they had access to. A browse function is also available. 

British newspapers
Over 2.2 million new articles have been added to Findmypast’s collection of historic British newspapers. The latest additions include 11 brand new titles including the Glasgow Sentinel, Lincolnshire Advertiser, Kentish Advertiser, Sheffield Iris, and the Yorkshire Early Bird. Substantial updates to existing titles include over 109,000 new articles from the Newcastle Journal and over 92,000 Birmingham Daily Gazette articles.
Nottinghamshire Records
Over 14,000 burial records and over 5000 baptism records have been added to our collection of Nottinghamshire parish records. Both the Nottinghamshire Baptisms and Nottinghamshire Burials consist of transcripts provided by the Nottinghamshire Family History Society. 

The Baptism records date from 1538 to 1980 can include the child’s name, religious denomination, church, baptism date, residence, parent’s names and father’s occupation. The Burial records date from 1539 to 1905 and can include the deceased’s name, religious denomination, age at death, burial date, burial place, and any additional notes. Notes can include information about their marital status, cause of death, occupation or more biographical details.    
            
Northern Territory Index records
Over 5,600 birth, marriage and death index records from Australia’s northern territory have also been added. The indexes were compiled using certificates held and administered by the Northern Territory Government’s Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages in the Department of the Attorney-General and Justice.


ABOUT
Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a British-owned world leader in online genealogy. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field of family history and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Mocavo, Genes Reunited, The British Newspaper Archive amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over two billion family history records, from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and doing detailed historical research.  

In April 2003 Findmypast was the first to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England and Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including major collections from Britain, Ireland, Australia, and the United States.

Thursday, May 14, 2015

IDG: Forbidden, Dawes, Jewish and Civil War "In-Briefs"

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was just received from our friends at IDG.



IN-BRIEF WITH THE IN-DEPTH GENEALOGIST

A new series of research guides

 The In-Depth Genealogist has developed a new series of research guides designed as a brief overview on a variety of topics. Each guide includes background information, research tips, websites, books, and other resources that can help in your research. The first four of the “In-Briefs” are:
  • “Researching the Forbidden” by Terri O’Connell
  • “Researching with the Dawes Rolls” by Liz Walker
  • “Researching Your Jewish Ancestors” by Jennifer Alford
  • “Researching Your Civil War Ancestors” by Cindy Freed
Each guide will be available as a 4-page PDF available for download ($2.75) or get the laminated version ($10 + shipping).  Subscribers to the website receive a 10% discount on purchase of each guide.  Attendees at the National Genealogical Society Conference have the opportunity to buy their laminated copy for a special price of just $8 + tax.  Visit the IDG booth (#317) to get the conference special. 

The guides will be available from The In-Depth Genealogist Store (http://theindepthgenealogist.com/shop-idg/idg-products/) starting on May 16th.

New Design Competition for WWI Memorial (US)

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was just received from our friends at the National Archives (US). 



NEW DESIGN COMPETITION FOR THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR ONE MEMORIAL

WASHINGTON, DC: On May 21st, 2015, the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission will open a design competition for a National World War I Memorial in Washington, DC. 

This represents a rare opportunity for the public to witness - and participate in - the creation of a National Memorial in the Nation's Capital. 

A formal kickoff press event will take place at the National Press Club in Washington DC on Thursday, May 21st, at 2:00 pm.  

Details for the design competition will be presented and discussed. The press event will then be followed by a walking tour of the proposed memorial site at nearby Pershing Park, located on Pennsylvania Avenue between 14th and 15th Streets NW.

The competition manual will be posted at the Commission’s website  www.worldwar1centennial.org by May 21.

The competition will be a two-stage design competition, and is an Open, International competition -- open to any professionals, university-level students, or any other interested participants.  

In the first stage, participants will submit narrative and graphic descriptions of a design concept responding to the competition’s design goals.  

Three to five submissions from Stage I will be selected as finalists, and those entries will be further refined and developed in Stage II.  

Both stages of the competition will be evaluated by a jury of individuals representing the worlds of government, the military, the arts, and the citizens of Washington DC.  The jurors were selected by the Commission, and the Commission will have final decision on the selected design, based on the recommendation of the jury.

The deadline for Stage I submissions is July 21, 2015, and Stage II finalists will be announced August 4, 2015.  The Commission expects to announce its selected design in January 2016.

Following is a link to a presentation on the memorial site and objectives given by Edwin Fountain, the Vice Chair of the World War I Centennial Commission, in August 2014, which sets forth in broad outline the Commission’s objectives in establishing a World War I memorial in the nation’s capital:  

http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/press-media/video-library.html


ABOUT WORLD WAR ONE

World War I was a terrible global conflict that was fought between July 28, 1914, and November 11, 1918. Some fifty countries were involved in fighting that spanned across Europe, Asia, and Africa, and on the seas around the world. The United States entered the war on April 6, 1917. During 18-months of American involvement, over four million Americans served in the military, and two million of them deployed overseas.  116,516 American service members died during the war, and 204,00 more were wounded. The United States played a significant role in the peace afterward, helping to shape the Treaty of Versailles. 

The war, and its aftermath, made enormous impact on the world - it dramatically shifted national borders, it brought new technology to industry and transportation, it changed attitudes toward women in the workplace, and it created new movements in the arts. The war’s effects are still with us, today, one hundred years later. 

ABOUT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR ONE MEMORIAL PROJECT

Since 1982, the United States has erected memorials in the nation’s capital to the veterans of the three other great wars of the twentieth century – Vietnam, Korea, and World War II.  But there is no such memorial in Washington to the veterans of World War I.  The World War I Centennial Commission believes the soldiers, sailors and marines of that war deserve no less honor than that we have accorded their successors.  More American servicemen and women died during World War I than in Korea and Vietnam combined; after our Civil War and World War II, World War I was our country’s costliest war, in terms of lives lost.

The new national World War I memorial will be located on Pennsylvania Avenue, “America’s Main Street,” one block from the White House and overlooking the Capitol.  The memorial will serve as both a dynamic urban space and, more importantly, as a fitting memorial to a generation of veterans whose service and sacrifice were no less valorous and heroic than that of the veterans of later wars – a generation that were the fathers and mothers of “the greatest generation.”

The twin goals of the World War I Centennial Commission are education and commemoration – goals which go hand in hand.  Over the next four years of the centennial period (2014-18) the Commission will educate the American people about a cataclysmic event in world history that began “the American century,” a war that not only shaped the face of the world for the next century to come, but that likewise changed the face of American society.  But education is inspired by commemoration, and so the goal of this design competition is to achieve a timeless memorial that will duly honor the service of America’s World War I veterans, while inspiring Americans today and tomorrow to better understand this profound event in our nation’s history.

ABOUT THE U.S. WORLD WAR ONE CENTENNIAL COMMISSION

The U.S World War One Centennial Commission is the United States government’s official entity for marking the centennial of World War One. The Commission was created by Congress via the World War One Centennial Commission Act on January 16, 2013, and will exist from now until 2019.

The Commission was created specifically to:

- Plan and execute commemorative programs and projects.

- Encourage private organizations and State and local governments to organize and participate in commemorative activities.

- Facilitate and coordinate commemorative activities throughout the U.S.

- Establish clearinghouse for information about centennial events.

- Make commemoration recommendations to Congress and the President 

In addition, the Commission has been authorized by Congress to create the National World War One Memorial, in Pershing Park, a site near the National Mall in Washington, DC. The memorial will honor the courage, sacrifice, and devotion to country, of those who answered the call to serve. The Memorial will be built using public donations. 

You can follow the Commission’s activities on the web: 

At our website    http://worldwar1centennial.org/ 

On our Facebook    https://www.facebook.com/ww1centennial  

On our Instagram   WW1CC     

And on our Twitter  @WW1CC, and using hashtags #WW1CC and #WWI

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Genealogy hangouts, webinars and chats this coming week

DearREADERS,
Thanks to the centralized calendar at GeneaWebinars.com, genealogists interested in learning more about our craft may register for these online seminars coming up this week. Be sure to verify the time in your neck of the woods. If you need a time zone converter see: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

This centralized calendar provides information about how to attend genealogy-related online meetings, classes, hangouts, seminars and webinars, where there is a visual slide share and/or website or software demo for attendees to view.

Hosts may use a variety of platforms including Adobe Connect, AnyMeeting, Captera, Google Hangouts on Air, GoToMeeting, GoToWebinar, Live Meeting, Skype, Web-Ex, and Wiggio, to name a few.

There are currently over 40 hosts with posting access to this calendar and blog, and over 200 hours of scheduled instruction for genealogists wishing to hone their research skills during the coming year. 


AMAZING!




Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Hangouts: http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE




NGS2015: Society Showcase

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was just received from our friends at the National Genealogical Society. We will be traveling to this annual conference next week.



Discover Missouri’s Genealogical Societies and Repositories
At the NGS Society Showcase
St. Charles, Missouri, 12 May 2015

ARLINGTON, VA, 13 APRIL 2015— If you are planning to attend the NGS 2015 Family History Conference, be sure to stop by this area when picking up your registration packet to learn about Missouri and Illinois genealogical repositories and resources at the NGS Society Showcase on Tuesday, May 12, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the St. Charles Convention Center.

St. Louis and the surrounding metropolitan area have a rich history and a wealth of genealogical data. Once the domain of Native American tribes, the French and Spanish ruled over Colonial Missouri before it was sold to America as part of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Over the centuries, settlers came from France, Germany, Ireland, Bohemia, Hungary, Italy, and Poland. Post Civil War and industrialization brought a large migration of African American’s from the South. From the earliest explorers, they left a prolific repository of diaries, letters, memories, maps, court documents, drawings, photographs, and more that are a treasure of trove for genealogists. 

Missouri and Illinois archives, libraries, genealogical and historical societies will be available at the Society Showcase to answer questions, discuss their group’s activities, and sell their publications. With a focus on genealogy societies in Missouri and surrounding states, this is an event you won’t want to miss.

Founded in 1903, the National Genealogical Society is dedicated to genealogical education, exemplary standards of research, and the preservation of genealogical records.  The Arlington, Virginia, based nonprofit is the premier national society for everyone, from the beginner to the most advanced family historian, seeking excellence in publications, educational offerings, and guidance in research. It also offers many opportunities to interact with other genealogists.

Saturday, May 09, 2015

NGS 2015: St. Charles, here we come, AmbushCAM in hand

DearREADERS,
There will be no Hangouts on Air next week and part of the following owing to the National Genealogical Society's annual family history conference in St. Charles, Missouri. Mr. Myrt is packing up our truck even as we speak. Yup, folks, DearMYRTLE's AmbushCAM will be looking for interviewees as genealogists throughout the globe gather in the midwest to discuss our favorite topic: genealogy.


+Cousin Russ will serve at home base in New Jersey while Ol' Myrt here sallies forth to conquer the masses. Depending on internet reliability, the short-subject AmbusyCAM interviews will occur spontaneously throughout the day, or will be uploaded as a batch nightly.

Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the GeneaWebinars Calendar for exact dates of DearMYRTLE study groups and Hangouts on Air, in addition to over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters in the next 12 months.
IMAGE: www.GeneaWebinars.com
Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
G+ DearMYRTLE Community
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE


Friday, May 08, 2015

Societies: Trying to "crank it out" the way they've always done it?

DearREADERS,"
Thank-you to +Susan Petersen for her post An Open Letter to Genealogy Societies published on her blog Long Lost Relatives wherein she directly chides legacy (read that old fashioned) organizations unwilling to update their outmoded policies and procedures. What ensued was a flurry of Facebook comments, some included here, all used here with permission. This discussion is too important to ignore.

 Lisa B Lee Susan, writes "You knocked it out of the park! Oh, I could KISS you. Yes, yes, and YES!!"

Linda McCauley writes "I agree with most of what you're saying, most especially the hoarding money thing. But as a state society board member, I can tell you that we are a year into having a digital quarterly publication, and we are still getting complaints from the people who want their printed copy back. We made the move because of cost. (It was costing almost all of the membership fee to provide a printed copy.)

As much as many of us are tuned in to the genealogy community online, I find the majority of our membership is not. Newsletters are still a valuable source of news to many society members even though they may be full of old news to others.

At this point, I don't understand why any society is spending money on a printed/mailed newsletter. Putting that money toward projects would do much more to grow the society.
Finding fresh blood for boards is easier said than done. This is only my 2nd year on the KGS board so I guess I'm still fairly fresh, but we struggle every year to get one person for each position on the ballot. And that is only eight. That usually results in the same people saying "OK, I'll do it again." If more people with new and innovative ideas were willing to run for positions on society boards, most of the problems you outlined would be solved."


Jill Ball, our gal in Australia writes "I am a member of a new society. Only two out of 49 members don't have email so it's been easy to utilise technology for communication etc.. It is refreshing to be in a group where members can't say "We've always done it that way".


Jenna Mills writes "Well done, Susan. I'm still considering my response on your post. I emailed the post to the entire MoSGA Board and all committee members. I'm not sure how many of them are "online" and wanted to be sure none of them missed reading this."


J Paul Hawthorne particularly relates "No. 1 - Hoarding money, is on my number one list too. I never (and still don't) understand it."

Jenna Mills writes "Susan, it could be they aren't viewing their members as customers or themselves as a business."


Is your society trying to "crank it out" they way they've always done it? WHY?
IMAGE: Courtesy Andre Koehne, Wikipedia Creative Commons:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mimeograph.svg
DearMYRTLE'S RESPONSE?During my tenure as President of the Manasota (now Manatee) Genealogical Society, we switched to digital newsletter distribution. Our strategy?
  1. Provide a 1/2 page newsletter announcement about the upcoming switch at least six issues before the switch. Include step-by-step instructions for locating the digital newsletters on the society website.
  2. Take two minutes during each general meeting and SIG meeting to demo the process for getting to the digital newsletter. Provide 1/2 page handouts with those directions.
  3. Each month during the six months before the switch, upload a digital copy of that month's newsletter. This is SOP in accounting circles - running both the old and new system for six months before shutting down the old system.
END RESULT? At the end of the six months, we had only one member out of 100+ active members who didn't have a computer. So we printed out a copy and hand carried it to her during her shift as a library volunteer in the genealogy department.



Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the GeneaWebinars Calendar for exact dates of DearMYRTLE study groups and Hangouts on Air, in addition to over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters in the next 12 months.
IMAGE: www.GeneaWebinars.com
Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
G+ DearMYRTLE Community
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE


Video: MGP3:Fundamental Concepts of the GPS

DearREADERS,
Today's substantive discussion illustrates points Dr. Jones makes in Chapter 2. Ol' Myrt here has just reviewed our recorded session together with the comments in the Community posted directly under the embedded video viewer found there. This empowering study group session is much better for my learning process than the typical genealogy lecture format. I need interaction to drill down to the essence of a thought before I can decide whether to incorporate that info into my system or reject it as either too radical or something I just don't understand.

SYLLABUS: Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof  (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013). [Book available from the publisher at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/mastering_genealogical_proof , also available in Kindle format through Amazon.com]


Dr. Jones is a Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists. That society's journal includes a brief review(1) of Mastering Genealogical Proof comparing the book to fellow Fellow Robert Charles Anderson's Elements of Genealogical Analysis. Reviewer David L. Green, FASG considers both titles essential to a genealogist's bookshelf but has sharp criticism for Dr. Jones referring to his own articles published in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly, the journal co-edited by Dr. Jones himself.

To this I'd respond we speak best using examples of our own work. I'd also state it's unclear if the publisher, NGS, required most examples and additional reading to be found among NGS resources.


SURE you can VIEW the archived Hangout on Air here, but why not head on over to DearMYRTLE's Genealogy Community on Google+ where you may VIEW and COMMENT. That way you could put Myrt's following comments in context, and add a few of your own: http://bit.ly/MyrtsPrevious


To +Carmen Cross​, a previous MGP Study Group panelist, Ol' Myrt here writes"I agree it IS valuable to study this again. It's like peeling back layers of an onion. Thankful for our panelists and participants' candor. It's by facing fears and unknowns together that we move forward. Ideas from multiple viewpoints make it easier for me to understand distinctions mentioned in Dr. Jones' book. "

To +Diane Brooks-Sherry Ol' Myrt here says "Traditional historical research and citation practices aren't detailed enough for proving genealogical questions, are they? This is a mind shift not unlike the difference between crocheting and knitting a pair of wool socks. We use some similar (yarn) and some different components (2 types of needles) to make the socks. The process (basic crochet vs knit stitch) is slightly different. And the final product (written conclusion) is socks."


To +Hilary Gadsby, a MGP2 Study Group panelist, Ol' Myrt here writes "A microfilm or microfiche view of the original record group of say wills, is a more reliable representation of an original will than say a single blog post with images of the same will because it's possible the image in the blog could have been altered."

To current panelist +Betty-Lu .Burton, Ol' Myrt here writes "Multiple "documents" may have information items (correct or incorrect) from the same informant. For instance family info on a death certificate, an obituary and a funeral card. In that case we must let the number of sources from the same informant outweigh other evidence. Does this make sense?"


Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the GeneaWebinars Calendar for exact dates of DearMYRTLE study groups and Hangouts on Air, in addition to over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters in the next 12 months.
IMAGE: www.GeneaWebinars.com
Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
G+ DearMYRTLE Community
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE

(1) Green, David L., untitled book review, The American Genealogist, (2014) Vol 87 No 1, 77-79.

Thursday, May 07, 2015

NARA: May 2015 McGowan Theater and YouTube presentations

NOTE: from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at the National Archives (US). Please address all inquiries to them.


 Washington, DC. . . The National Archives presents a series of daytime public programs in May on topics ranging from Civil War soldiers’ prosthetics to freedom of speech.  These programs are free and open to the public and will be held at the National Archives Building in Washington, DC.  Programs in the William G. McGowan Theater will be streamed live on YouTube.  Attendees to programs in the Theater should use the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue at 7th Street, NW.  Attendees to programs in the Research Center should use the Research Entrance at 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW.  Metro accessible on the Yellow and Green lines, Archives/Navy Memorial/Penn Quarter station.

BOOK TALK:  Freedom of Speech: Mightier Than the Sword
Wednesday, May 13 at noon, William G. McGowan Theater & YouTube
Pulitzer Prize–winning author and journalist David K. Shipler discusses his book, Freedom of Speech: Mightier than the Sword. Shipler focuses on recent free speech controversies across the nation and reveals the patterns of both suppression and opportunity that are making today a transitional moment. A book signing will follow the program.

GENEALOGY TALK: Using Records of Artificial Limbs for Union Civil War Veterans, 1861–1927
Thursday, May 14, at 2 p.m., William G. McGowan Theater & YouTube
Claire Kluskens, archivist, will discuss records in the National Archives that may give information about a veteran’s medical condition and whether he received money or an artificial limb from the U.S. Government.

GENEALOGY HELP:  “Help! I’m Stuck” Genealogy Consultation
Saturday, May 16, noon–4 p.m., Room G-25, Research Center
Not sure where to begin? Has a genealogical problem stumped you? An archivist is available to answer your questions. Sign up for a 20-minute appointment at the Microfilm Research desk on Saturday.

BOOK TALK:  The Baltimore Sabotage Cell: German Agents, American Traitors, and the U-Boat Deutschland During World War I
Monday, May 18, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater & YouTube
By the summer of 1915, Germany was faced with two major problems in fighting World War I: the British blockade and how to disrupt the British supply line across the Atlantic. Their solution was to create a U-boat fleet and employ German agents to carry out sabotage missions in the U.S. Dwight R. Messimer discusses these two solutions and one man behind them: Paul Hilken, in Baltimore. A book signing will follow the program.

Related Featured Document Display: 100th Anniversary of the Sinking of the RMS Lusitania
East Rotunda Gallery, through June 3, 2016
The Lusitania sank in 18 minutes, and only six of the ship’s lifeboats were successfully deployed. Nearly 1,200 passengers and crew died. A drawing of the lifeboat used in the Lusitania liability case is on display.

CIVIL WAR TALK:  Restoring the Brotherhood of Union: Confederate Pardon and Amnesty Records, 1865–1877
Thursday, May 21, at 2 p.m., William G. McGowan Theater & YouTube
Archives specialist John Deeben provides a brief legislative history of amnesty activity during and after the Civil War by examining the application process and resulting records of Presidential pardons and congressional amnesty offered to former Confederates.

BOOK TALK:  The Bill of Rights: The Fight to Secure America’s Liberties
Wednesday, May 27, at noon, William G. McGowan Theater & YouTube
Revered today for articulating America’s founding principles, the Bill of Rights was in fact a political stratagem by James Madison to preserve the Constitution, the Federal Government, and the latter’s authority over the states. Carol Berkin discusses the story of the fight over the document, the ongoing debate over the Founders’ original intent, and what it means for our country today.  A book signing will follow the program.

BOOK TALK:  Building a Paper Trail: Using Archival Materials to Construct a Narrative
Thursday, May 28, at noon, Room G-25, Research Center
Glenn C. Frankel, professor of journalism at the University of Texas at Austin and a recipient of a Pulitzer Prize in journalism, will discuss research for his book project, “The Hollywood Blacklist and the Making of High Noon.”

The National Archives is fully accessible, and Assisted Listening Devices are available in the McGowan Theater upon request.