Sunday, November 29, 2015

ANNOUNCING: GenTools Study Group - 2 Dec 2015




DearREADERS,
YAY! Our oft-requested and long-awaited GenTools Study Group begins Wednesday. Somehow we managed to squeeze in 9 sessions before RootsTech 2016. We will be discussing software, websites, devices and "things" to help genealogists "do their thing" as accurately and efficiently as possible. We'll probably have some follow-on discussions based on our visits with innovators while at that annual conference.


We begin our *live* sessions Wednesdays at:

Noon Eastern US (New York)
11am Central US (Chicago)
10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)

Wednesday (Dates corrected)
2 Dec 2015 - Organization Tools
9 Dec 2015 - Equipment
16 Dec 2015 - Note Taking Tools
23 Dec 2015 - Transcribing and Indexing Tools
30 Dec 2015 - Research Tools
6 Jan 2016 - Map Tools
13 Jan 2016 - Analysis Tools
20 Jan 2016 - Compiling Tools
27 Jan 2016 - Sharing Tools
If you need a time zone converter, here's one DearMYRTLE recommends:
http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

FEE
This DearMYRTLE Hangout on Air is presented at no cost to attendees. If you find the information useful, consider the Pay What You Want business model Ol' Myrt employs:
http://blog.dearmyrtle.com/2015/03/hangouts-pay-what-you-want.html

VIEW and post COMMENTS before, during and after the Hangout on Air here:
http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext

We open the "green room" 15 minutes early if you'd like to test out your microphone and webcam. Consider JOINing the panel when we "scramble" to mix up the conversation a bit with new panelists

RECORDED VERSION
If you miss the live events, catch the archived version at your convenience: http://bit.ly/MyrtsPrevious


SURE you can VIEW the session right here, but to COMMENT, you'll want to join DearMYRTLE on Google+ http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext







Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
G+ DearMYRTLE Community
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE
RootsTech2016 Ambassador


Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the GeneaWebinars Calendar for exact dates of DearMYRTLE study groups and hangouts in addition to over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.



Saturday, November 28, 2015

Online genealogy classes this week

DearREADERS,
Thanks to the centralized calendar at GeneaWebinars.com, genealogists interested in learning more about our craft may register for these online classes and seminars coming up this week. Be sure to verify the time in your neck of the woods. If you need a time zone converter see: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

This centralized calendar provides information about how to attend genealogy-related online meetings, classes, hangouts, seminars and webinars, where there is a visual slide share and/or website or software demo for attendees to view.

Hosts may use a variety of platforms including Adobe Connect, AnyMeeting, Captera, Google Hangouts on Air, GoToMeeting, GoToWebinar, Live Meeting, Skype, Second Life, Web-Ex, and Wiggio, to name a few.

There are currently over 40 hosts with posting access to this calendar and blog, and over 200 hours of scheduled instruction for genealogists wishing to hone their research skills during the coming year. 


AMAZING!




Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Hangouts: http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE







Tuesday, November 24, 2015

2016 ESM's QuickLessons Study Group



DearREADERS,
As always, DearMYRTLE's focus is beginning genealogy topics. This year we followed the FamilySearch Wiki for several study group series. We are pleased to announce the  2016 ESM's QuickLessons Study Group. Below you'd find the session dates and the reading homework to be completed in advance of each session. The call for panelists will go out in early March 2016.

Note: Although active on Facebook and the Evidence Explained website, the author Elizabeth Shown Mills will not participate in our study group.

The 60-minute sessions will be held Wednesdays as follows:

Noon Eastern US (New York)
11am Central US (Chicago)
10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)
UTC-7 hours

If you need a time zone converter, this is the one Ol' Myrt uses:
http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html


16 March 2016
QuickLesson 1: Analysis & Citation   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 1: Analysis and Citation,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage(https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-1-analysis-citation :  accessed 1 Aug 2015).        

23 March 2016
QuickLesson 2: Sources vs. Information vs. Evidence vs. Proof   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 2: Sources vs. Information vs. Evidence vs. Proof,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-2-sources-vs-information-vs-evidence-vs-proof : accessed 1 Aug 2015).        

30 March 2016
QuickLesson 3: Flawed Records   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 3: Flawed Records,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-3-flawed-records : accessed 1 Aug 2015).        

6 April 2016
QuickLesson 4: NARA Citations & Finding Aids   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 4: NARA Citations & Finding Aids,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-4-nara-citations-finding-aids : accessed 30 Sept 2015).        

13 April 2016
QuickLesson 5: Analyzing Records   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 5: Analyzing Records,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-5-analyzing-records : accessed 30 Sept 2015).    

20 April 2016
The Research Plan: Two-step Next Steps?
Elizabeth Shown Mills, "The Research Plan: Two-step Next Steps?" Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/quicktips/research-plan-two-step-next-steps : accessed 30 Sept 2015).
and   
QuickLesson 6: Mindmapping Records   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 6: Mindmapping Records,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-6-mindmapping-records : accessed 30 Sept 2015).       

---------------------
3-week break
---------------------


18 May 2016
QuickLesson 7: Family Lore and Indian Princesses   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 7: Family Lore and Indian Princesses,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-7-family-lore-and-indian-princesses : accessed 30 Sept 2015).

20 May 2016
QuickLesson 8: What Constitutes Proof?   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 8: What Constitutes Proof?” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-8-what-constitutes-proof : accessed 30 Sept 2015).    

25 May 2016
QuickLesson 9: Census Instructions? Who Needs Instructions?   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 9: Census Instructions? Who Needs Instructions?” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-9-census-instructions-who-needs-instructions : accessed 30 Sept 2015).

1 June 2016
QuickLesson 10: Original Records, Image Copies, and Derivatives   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 10: Original Records, Image Copies, and Derivatives,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage(https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-10-original-records-image-copies-and-derivatives : accessed 30 Sept 2015).

8 June 2016
QuickLesson 11: Identity Problems & the FAN Principle   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 11: Identity Problems & the FAN Principle,”Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-11-identity-problems-fan-principle : accessed 30 Sept 2015).        

15 June 2016
QuickLesson 12: Chasing an Online Record into Its Rabbit Hole   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 12: Chasing an Online Record into Its Rabbit Hole,”Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-12-chasing-online-record-its-rabbit-hole : accessed 30 Sept 2015).    
and
Following up on QuickLesson 12
Elizabeth Shown Mills, "Following up on QuickLesson 12," Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/following-quicklesson-12 : accessed 30 Sept 2015).        

22 June 2016
QuickLesson 13: Classes of Evidence—Direct, Indirect & Negative   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 13: Classes of Evidence―Direct, Indirect & Negative,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-13-classes-evidence%E2%80%94direct-indirect-negative : accessed 30 Sept 2015).             

29 June 2016
Sources, Information, Evidence
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “Sources, Information, Evidence," Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/sources-information-evidence : accessed 30 Sept 2015).        
and
A Basic Vocabulary for Historical Research
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “A Basic Vocabulary for Historical Research," Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/quicktips/basic-vocabulary-historical-research    : accessed 30 Sept 2015).   

6 July 2016
QuickLesson 14: Petitions—What Can We Do with a List of Names?   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 14: Petitions—What Can We Do with a List of Names?” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage(https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-14-petitions%E2%80%94what-can-we-do-list-names : accessed 30 Sept 2015).        
and
"Printed Primary Sources" and Naive Trust   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “ 'Printed Primary Sources' and Naive Trust," Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/quicktips/printed-primary-sources-naive-trust : accessed 30 Sept 2015).


13 July 2016
QuickLesson 15: Plagiarism—Five "Copywrongs" of Historical Writing   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 15: Plagiarism―Five "Copywrongs" of Historical Writing,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage(https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-15-plagiarism—five-copywrongs-historical-writing : accessed 30 Sept 2015).   

---------------------
2-week break
---------------------


3 August 2016
QuickLesson 16: Speculation, Hypothesis, Interpretation & Proof   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 16: Speculation, Hypothesis, Interpretation and Proof,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage(https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-16-speculation-hypothesis-interpretation-proof : accessed 30 Sept 2015).        


8 August 2016
QuickLesson 17: The Evidence Analysis Process Map   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 17: The Evidence Analysis Process Model,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-17-evidence-analysis-process-map : accessed 30 Sept 2015).   
and
Negative Findings / Negative Evidence
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “Negative Findings / Negative Evidence,"  Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/negative-findings-negative-evidence    : accessed 30 Sept 2015).   

15 August 2016
QuickLesson 18: Genealogy? In the Academic World? Seriously?   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 18: Genealogy? In the Academic World?” Seriously? Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-18-genealogy-academic-world-seriously : accessed 30 Sept 2015).        


24 Aug 2016
QuickLesson 19: Layered Citations Work Like Layered Clothing   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 19: Layered Citations Work Like Layered Clothing,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-19-layered-citations-work-layered-clothing : acessed 30 Sept 2015).        
and
RE: QuickLesson 19 - Layered Citations / Penned Question
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “RE: QuickLesson 19 - Layered Citations / Penned Question," Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/re-quicklesson-19-layered-citations-penned-question : accessed 30 Sept 2015).        

---------------------
(3-week break)
---------------------


14 September 2016
Citing digital census images on LAC - not Ancestry   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “Citing digital census images on LAC - not Ancestry," Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/citing-digital-census-images-lac-not-ancestry : accessed 30 Sept 2015).

21 September 2016
QuickLesson 20: Research Reports for Research Success
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 20: Research Reports for Research Success," Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-20-research-reports-research-success  :  accessed 30 Sept 2015).    

28 Sept Sept 2016QuickLesson 21: Citing DNA Evidence: Five Ground Rules   
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “QuickLesson 21: Citing DNA Evidence: Five Ground Rules,” Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/content/quicklesson-21-citing-dna-evidence-five-ground-rules : accessed 30 Sept 2015).    
and
Writing Historical Biography
Elizabeth Shown Mills, “Writing Historical Biography," Evidence Explained: Historical Analysis, Citation and Source Usage (https://www.evidenceexplained.com/quicktips/writing-historical-biography : accessed 30 Sept 2015).




Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
G+ DearMYRTLE Community
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE
RootsTech2016 Ambassador 

Check the GeneaWebinars Calendar for exact dates of DearMYRTLE study groups and hangouts in addition to over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.



Saturday, November 21, 2015

Want to learn more? Check out online classes this coming week



DearREADERS,
Thanks to the centralized calendar at GeneaWebinars.com, genealogists interested in learning more about our craft may register for these online classes and seminars coming up this week. Be sure to verify the time in your neck of the woods. If you need a time zone converter see: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

This centralized calendar provides information about how to attend genealogy-related online meetings, classes, hangouts, seminars and webinars, where there is a visual slide share and/or website or software demo for attendees to view.

Hosts may use a variety of platforms including Adobe Connect, AnyMeeting, Captera, Google Hangouts on Air, GoToMeeting, GoToWebinar, Live Meeting, Skype, Second Life, Web-Ex, and Wiggio, to name a few.

There are currently over 40 hosts with posting access to this calendar and blog, and over 200 hours of scheduled instruction for genealogists wishing to hone their research skills during the coming year. 


AMAZING!




Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Hangouts: http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE







Friday, November 20, 2015

Optimizations in the new Google+




DearREADERS,
Things, they are a changin' and we sure love what we're seeing on the new Google+. This is in direct response to the increasing use of mobile devices over desktop computers. In this video post, +Cousin Russ and Ol' Myrt here explore the DearMYRTLE Genealogy Community, so you can see it's still very easy to navigate.

Basically, the desktop user view more closely resembles the mobile user view of Google+.

ONE THING'S THE SAME - We will continue to pin the next hangout on the top of the community posts.

WHAT'S DIFFERENT?
Comments on a post, rotate in a 2-line preview. You'll click to view all comments in the usual scroll down the list mode.

The new share button permits sharing a post to Facebook, Twitter, and other Google+ locations. There is also the option to share the link, say for a blog post.



The left navigation bar in a community, where we file our previous hangouts is collapsed. Just click the down arrow button shown below to see the categories:



Since the category of "Google+ Events" has been removed, you'll be using the www.GeneaWebinars.com Calendar. DearMYRTLE's upcoming events are found there, plus over 200+ hours of educational opportunities from other genealogy hosts.

There is a "Go back to Classic G+" button in the lower left, but we recommend exploring the new features.



There's a new way to invite specific people and share this community with your friends. See the screen shot below.






Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
G+ DearMYRTLE Community
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE
RootsTech2016 Ambassador

REGISTER: www.RootsTech.org


Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the GeneaWebinars Calendar for exact dates of DearMYRTLE study groups and hangouts in addition to over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.



Tuesday, November 17, 2015

RootsTech 2016 Saturday Keynote: Doris Kearns Goodwin





 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—November 4, 2015)—RootsTech, the largest family history conference in the world, announced Doris Kearns Goodwin has joined its lineup of keynote speakers. Goodwin, a world-renowned Pulitzer Prize-winning author, will speak at the RootsTech general session on Saturday, February 6, at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Goodwin will share her insights into the personal and family lives of past presidential leaders and the influence their ancestors had on their personalities, behavior, decisions, and careers. She will also share anecdotes about her own family and experiences which have shaped and influenced her life.
 
Goodwin has been hailed by New York magazine as “America’s historian-in-chief” for her in-depth scrutiny into the lives, actions, and family influences of America’s presidents, and the history of the country. She provided extensive subject matter expertise for PBS and the History Channel’s documentaries on the Kennedy family, LBJ, Franklin Roosevelt, Abraham and Mary Lincoln, and Ken Burns’ The History of Baseball and The History of The Civil War. She also worked with Steven Spielberg on the movie Lincoln, based in part on Goodwin’s award-winning Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln.
 
Goodwin received the Pulitzer Prize in 1995 for No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II. In addition, she has authored biographies of several other U.S. Presidents, including Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream; The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys: An American Saga;  Team of rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln (which was awarded the Lincoln Prize),and her most recent book, The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism.
 
Goodwin‘s biographies are not limited to presidents and politicians. Wait Till Next Year, her touching, best-selling memoir, draws her readers into life as she knew it in the 1950s in the suburbs of New York. She portrays the post-World War II era New York when the corner store was the gathering place for people to share stories and discuss their baseball differences with neighbors who were equally divided between Dodger, Giant, and Yankee fans.

Goodwin is expected to share memories of the lifelong influence of her parents: her mother, who taught her the joy of books, and her father, who taught her the joy of baseball and the Dodgers. She describes how two events deeply affected her: the Dodgers left Brooklyn in 1957 and the death of her mother. Both events marked the end of an era and, for her, the end of childhood. 
 
Goodwin wrote Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream using first-hand insight into President Lyndon B. Johnson’s life. She served as an assistant in LBJ’s last year in the White House, and later assisted him in the preparation of his memoirs. On his 107th birthday, August 27, 2015, Goodwin said in retrospect, “LBJ was surely the most colorful politician I have ever met…. How I wish the LBJ that I knew in private—the colorful, ever fascinating, larger-than-life figure—had been able to project more of that effervescent personality into his public life.”
 
Goodwin is a frequent guest commentator on most of the major networks. Spielberg’s DreamWorks Studios has also purchased film rights to her book, The Bully Pulpit, which chronicles the first 10 years of the Progressive era through the administrations of Theodore Roosevelt and William Taft.
Other keynote speakers for RootsTech 2016 announced previously are New York Times bestselling author Bruce Feiler, award-winning journalist Paula Williams Madison, and the president and CEO of FamilySearch International, Stephen Rockwood. See the Keynote Page at RootsTech.org for more information about each of these speakers.  
 
About RootsTech
RootsTech is the largest family history event in the world, reaching hundreds of thousands of participants around the world. Originating at the Salt Palace in Salt Lake City and simulcast around the world, many sessions will be recorded for later viewing. Participants learn how to discover, preserve, and share family stories and connections across generations. World-class speakers will be featured, entertainment and engaging classes are offered, and with the event, in a vast expo hall, everyone, regardless of age or experience, will find something of interest.
 
Source: FamilySearch Blog, "Pulitzer Prize Winning Biographer, Historian, Doris Kearns Goodwin, to Keynote RootsTech 2016" 2015, Salt Lake City: Intellectual Reserve, Inc. (https://familysearch.org/blog/en/pulitzer-prize-winning-biographer-historian-doris-kearns-goodwin-keynote-rootstech-2016 : accessed 17 Nov 2015).


Saturday, November 14, 2015

Curious about online learning?



DearREADERS,
Thanks to the centralized calendar at GeneaWebinars.com, genealogists interested in learning more about our craft may register for these online classes and seminars coming up this week. Be sure to verify the time in your neck of the woods. If you need a time zone converter see: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

This centralized calendar provides information about how to attend genealogy-related online meetings, classes, hangouts, seminars and webinars, where there is a visual slide share and/or website or software demo for attendees to view.

Hosts may use a variety of platforms including Adobe Connect, AnyMeeting, Captera, Google Hangouts on Air, GoToMeeting, GoToWebinar, Live Meeting, Skype, Second Life, Web-Ex, and Wiggio, to name a few.

There are currently over 40 hosts with posting access to this calendar and blog, and over 200 hours of scheduled instruction for genealogists wishing to hone their research skills during the coming year. 


AMAZING!




Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Hangouts: http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE







Friday, November 13, 2015

WACKY Wednesday - A Visit with Bernice Bennett

 
DearREADERS,
We are in for a treat Wednesday 18 Nov 2015. We're visiting with Bernice Alexander Bennett a noted lecturer, author, and family historian researching and documenting her African American roots.

Bernice is a Citizen’s Archivist with the National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, DC, where she prepares Widows’ pension records for restoration and digitization for Fold3. Also, she is the producer and host of a weekly Blogtalkradio show – Research at the National Archives and Beyond.  She has spoken at national and local genealogical conferences, webinar speaker and is a coordinator and faculty for the Midwest African American Genealogy Institute.
IMAGE: Bernice Bennett



Bennett has a BS in Education from Grambling State University and an MPH from the University of Michigan in Community Health Education. She attended the Institute of Genealogical Research at Samford, the National Institute of Genealogical Research and numerous genealogical society conferences. In addition, Bennett is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogist, the National Genealogy Society, Afro American Historical and Genealogical Society and many more. Bennett has been selected to serve as an Ambassador for RootsTech 2016.
WHERE
http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext

WHEN
Wednesday, 18 Nov 2015
9pm Eastern (New York)
8pm Central (Chicago)
7pm Mountain (Denver, Salt Lake City)
6pm Pacific (Los Angeles)
UTC-7 hours

If you need a time zone converter, this is the one Ol' Myrt uses:
http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

 





 

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
G+ DearMYRTLE Community
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE
RootsTech2016 Ambassador

Register today! www.RootsTech.org.

Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the GeneaWebinars Calendar for exact dates of DearMYRTLE study groups and hangouts in addition to over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.



Sunday, November 08, 2015

Remembrance Day and Veterans Day Tribute - Mondays with Myrt




DearREADERS,
We're hosting a special Remembrance Day and Veterans Day Tribute during Mondays with Myrt tomorrow, 9 Nov 2015. Remembrance Day is observed on 11 November in most countries to recall the end World War I on that date in 1918. Hostilities formally ended "at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month", in accordance with the armistice signed by representatives of Germany and the Entente between 5:12 and 5:20 that morning. ("At the 11th hour" refers to the passing of the 11th hour, or 11:00 am.) The First World War officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remembrance_Day

IMAGE: Poppies are laid on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Ottowa.

Here in the United States we refer to this as Veterans Day as it also commemorates Armistice Day. Veterans Day celebrates the service of all U.S. military veterans, while Memorial Day is a day of remembering the men and women who perished while in service.

IMAGE: Joseph Ambrose, an 86-year-old World War I veteran,
attends the dedication day parade
for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in 1982.
He is holding the flag that covered the casket
of his son, who was killed in the Korean War

The *live* broadcast of our hangout begins as follows:

WHERE http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext
WHEN Noon Eastern US (New York)
11am Central US (Chicago)
10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)

If you need a time zone converter, here's one DearMYRTLE recommends:
http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html


Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
G+ DearMYRTLE Community
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE
RootsTech2016 Ambassador

Register today: www.RootsTech.org


Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the GeneaWebinars Calendar for exact dates of DearMYRTLE study groups and hangouts in addition to over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.



Saturday, November 07, 2015

Educational events this coming week



DearREADERS,
Thanks to the centralized calendar at GeneaWebinars.com, genealogists interested in learning more about our craft may register for these online classes and seminars coming up this week. Be sure to verify the time in your neck of the woods. If you need a time zone converter see: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

This centralized calendar provides information about how to attend genealogy-related online meetings, classes, hangouts, seminars and webinars, where there is a visual slide share and/or website or software demo for attendees to view.

Hosts may use a variety of platforms including Adobe Connect, AnyMeeting, Captera, Google Hangouts on Air, GoToMeeting, GoToWebinar, Live Meeting, Skype, Second Life, Web-Ex, and Wiggio, to name a few.

There are currently over 40 hosts with posting access to this calendar and blog, and over 200 hours of scheduled instruction for genealogists wishing to hone their research skills during the coming year. 


AMAZING!




Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt     :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
Hangouts: http://bit.ly/MyrtsNext
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
G+: +Pat Richley-Erickson
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont  
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE







Wednesday, November 04, 2015

ARCHIVED: Tracing Immigrant Origins Study Group - Immigraton and Naturalization




DearREADERS,
Today's Tracing Immigrant Origins Study Group session included a good cross-section of records one encounters when looking at immigration and naturalization records over a period of years. Cousin Russ and Ol' Myrt here are constantly amazed by the generous participation of our panelist and those who post homework with examples from their personal research.





OTHER SESSIONS in this series:
Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
G+ DearMYRTLE Community
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE
RootsTech2016 Ambassador



Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the GeneaWebinars Calendar for exact dates of DearMYRTLE study groups and hangouts in addition to over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.



Tuesday, November 03, 2015

2015: The true future of blogging



DearREADERS,
Perhaps Melissa Barker said it best: "I wonder how things like this post effect people who are thinking about blogging or just started blogging, I don't want anyone to be discouraged." She is referring to "What is the future of genealogical blogs?" posted today in James Tanner's Genealogy's Star blog.

As a relative new-comer in the genealogical vertical, Tanner has a somewhat skewed view of blogging in the broader context of emerging information distribution and social networking technologies. Yet, in his professional career as an attorney, I'm sure he will recall his staff bridged the technology gap - effectively transitioning from electric typewriters to word processors, and finally computers with word processing software. 

A portion of  The Smoke Signal by Frederic Remington,
Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, 1905 oil on canvas (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frederic_Remington_smoke_signal.jpg : viewed 3 Nov 2015.)


AN ABBREVIATED TIMELINE OF GENEALOGY INFORMATION DISTRIBUTION


Modern genealogists and family historians marched boldly through the following technology advances:
  • Family Bible notations (Though most have not survived, these may provide the only extant record for many early families. My late friend Elsie Naylor had one with a publication date in the early 1600s.)
  • Original record sets (Found in courthouses, church archives, historical societies, etc. in textural format. It is said the earliest English parish registers date from the first decade of the 16th century. Surviving Scotland wills and testaments date from 1513.)  
  • Print media (Circa 1700s - Newspapers in US Colonies, distributed by horseback to neighboring communities. Circa 1847 - genealogical publications, expensive and slow, snail mail service for family newsletters and select society journals and quarterlies. NEHGS' Register and the later published NGS Quarterly come immediately to mind here, though there were others. In the 20th century, Everton's Genealogical Helper played significantly, as did the queries section of the Atlantic Monthly. Heritage Quest briefly joined the ranks. Other groups like the then-named Silicon Valley PAF Users Group, and proactive local Family History Societies (England) printed small, short run how-to guides. ) 
  • Typed Family Group Sheets (These are prone to error like any compiled genealogy, including the more recent phenomenon of online family trees.)
  • Micoforms (Microfilm and microfiche copies of original courthouse and church records. A primary preservation activity of the Genealogical Society of Utah, renamed FamilySearch in recent decades.)
  • FIDO-net and BBS (Bulletin Board Services) where one directed his computer to literally dial in to a remote computer, like the National Genealogical Society's computer to download a text file about a specific research process. Long distance telephone access fees applied.)
  • Online services (Circa 1985: Dick Eastman on CompuServe, Myra Vanderpool Gormley on Prodigy, Rhonda McClure on Genie, and many of us on Q-Link > AppleLink/PCLink> AOL's Genealogy Forum. Principally chats and message boards.)
  • Websites (Circa 1995, steep HTML coding learning curve. There was no WYSIWYG. How Cyndi Ingle did it then, I'll never know.)
  • RootsWeb Mailing Lists & Message Boards (Thanks to Karen and Brian Leverich. John Fuller published the authoritative list of mailing lists.)
  • WebLogs (Circa 1999, the name became popularized as blogs, employing RSS - Really Simple Syndication. For bloggers from this time period, it was about sharing the story of an ancestor, preserving history, perhaps advertising a local genealogy society meeting or online typed chat.)
  • Podcasts and Live Internet Radio Streaming (Circa 1999. I believe Ol' Myrt was the first, but The Genealogy Guys is the longest, continually running podcast in our vertical.) 
During the 20th century commercial genealogy entities were largely confined to these outlets:
  • Book publishing (Think Handybook for Genealogists here, then The Source: A Guidebook for American Genealogy, among other standard titles. You simply didn't find these titles on the bookshelves at Barnes and Noble in the early days. You had to attend a genealogy conference to even see these titles and realize their importance.)
  • Mailers (Distributed through the US and international mail services.
  • Press releases (Distributed was through traditional news outlets, largely ignored by publishers. Also via  direct-mail flyers and distribution with genealogy software and books.)
  • Annual regional and national conferences (Frequently the only place attendees hear about a record collection in film or textural format, and the only place to find genealogy books and software was at NGS or FGS conferences here in the US. My US-centric myopia is evident here.)
THE TECHNOLOGY BANDWAGON
With the explosive growth of the Internet (the information super-highway) it's only only natural that forward-thinking commercial genealogy entities and genealogy writers embrace technology during the late 20th and early 21st century. I see no problem with company reps distributing their press releases using blog (RSS) syndication technology. That's smart use of technology. Yet Tanner states "With the rise of commercial blogging, the social networking side of blogging has been preempted by other social networking entities."  Ol' Myrt here is only left to wonder:
Why does Mr. Tanner see commercial entities embracing technology as threatening to genealogy bloggers?
From where I sit, both genealogy bloggers and commercial entities are wisely employing available social media outlets to "get the word out."
On what basis does Mr. Tanner make the following observation? "One marked effect of this shift is an additional de-emphasis on personal, non-commercial blogging." He apparently isn't reading the blogs Ol' Myrt here follow.

IN THE MEAN TIME
Genealogy bloggers, researchers, archivists (including The Archivist of the United States), commercial entities and such have embraced such technologies as:
  • Facebook (It's hard to ignore 1.49 billion monthly active users)
  • Twitter (Including the POTUS)
  • Webinars
  • Hangouts
  • Tweetchats
  • Google Docs, Sheets and Slides
  • Google+ 
  • Instagram
  • Pinterest
  • Vimeo
  • SlideShare
  • Second Life
  • LinkedIn 
Have genealogy companies and writers  broken out of stuffed-shirt mode?  Certainly. That's life.

I recall the Queen of England made a cameo appearance in a recent James Bond movie. Who else is up for hang gliding?
Let's enjoy life, Mr. Tanner, and realize there is more than enough room for everyone at the genea-table.

YOUTUBE RED
Tanner's comments about YouTube Red demonstrate a misunderstanding about the new end-user opt out option to pay a small fee each month to automatically skip past ad insertions. I equate this with my Dish Network offering to skip commercials on shows archived on my personal DVR. Tanner writes "The move by Google to monetized what has been a "free" service is similar to what has happened in the genealogical blogging community." Google offering YouTube Red to its end users and Ol' Myrt's genealogy blogging options are markedly dissimilar, and frankly one cannot compare apples and oranges, Mr. Tanner. Google has every right to collect income on this wildly popular YouTube service.

Personally, I'm thrilled by the availability of free behind-the-scenes production technology from Google so Cousin Russ and our panelists can "get the word out."

MYRT'S TAKE
Genealogy blogging is not dead, commercial or otherwise. It's simply the easiest way for a family historian to share his view of an ancestor, include a photo, and ensure the post will be every-word searchable by the Internet's principle search engines. 

I'm not in the least bit worried about commercial companies using blog technology. If I don't like the product or service, I am free to unsubscribe that entity from my news aggregating service, currently Feedly.com.

In the past month I've seen six new non-commercial genealogy blogs established, including one created by a county archivist specifically to describe ephemera preserved at the archive honoring the county's past residents and businesses. Others are foregoing blogs in order to Share a Memory using Google docs, sheets and slides. Who cares what platform they use?
Its a matter of choice. People in the free world choose the clothes we wear, the cars we drive, and what to have for dinner. No one dictates we must purchase a specific sofa and paint our walls a certain color.

Likewise, those who want to "get the word out" aren't restricted to a single information distribution method.

DearMYRTLE should not be considered pushed aside by big-time commercial genealogy entities, nor should I be called a failure as a blogger because I choose to do more video blogging.

I can adjust with the times, just like Mr. Tanner's law office staff.

Its all good.
 

IMAGE AT TOP:
Hieroglyphics on a funerary stela uploaded by Thursby16 under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license. ( https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Heiroglyphs.jpg : viewed 3 Nov 2015)

Happy family tree climbing!
Myrt :)
DearMYRTLE,
Your friend in genealogy.

Blog: http://blog.DearMYRTLE.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/DearMYRTLE
G+ DearMYRTLE Community
Twitter: @DearMYRTLE
Second Life: Clarise Beaumont
http://www.youtube.com/user/DearMYRTLE
RootsTech2016 Ambassador

Register today: www.RootsTech.org