Monday, October 31, 2016

Spooktacular Mondays with Myrt is a GO!




DearREADERS,
What do genealogists do to celebrate Halloween 2016? They arrive in costume ready to appear on the panel during Mondays with Myrt. Come on over, it will be fun! And we get to talk about our favorite subject - family history. If you wish to be considered for a prize, you'll need to log in with your Google account. We open the "green room" 15 minutes early, so you can adjust your mic, earphones and webcam.
   
SPOOKTACULAR
Mondays with Myrt
31 October 2016
Noon Eastern US (New York)
11am Central US (Chicago)
10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)
UTC-7 hours
There will be prizes for the BEST costumes!

HOW TO GET THERE
1. Go to Mondays with Myrt - 31 Oct 2016 (link to be provided shortly).
https://goo.gl/tqnDdu
2. Click to register with Facebook, Google, LinkedIn or Twitter. Remember you must use Google if you wish to appear on the video to show off your costume.
3. Find your personal URL to join in your confirmation email.


Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you'll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.


Sunday, October 23, 2016

2 Unusual DearMYRTLE hangouts this week





DearREADERS,
In addition to Mondays with Myrt, we're hanging out on Wednesday exploring YouTube. It's got some mighty powerful video editing tools - and they're free! Just what you need for uploading and editing your Day in the Life of a Genealogist video.
Noon Eastern US (New York)
11am Central US (Chicago)
10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)
UTC-7 hours

9pm Eastern US (New York)
8pm Central US (Chicago)
7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles)
UTC-7 hours

WHERE TO REGISTER
1. Go to http://hangouts.DearMYRTLE.com
2. Register using either your Facebook, Google, LinkedIn or Twitter account.
3. Look for your personal "join" link in your confirmation and reminder emails.
NOTE: You only need to log in with your Google account if you wish to appear on the filmstrip as a panel participant. If you do, arrive about 15 minutes before the scheduled broadcast for a mic and earphone check.

Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you'll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.


Saturday, October 22, 2016

FindMyPast: Gen Soc of Ireland journals and publications

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at FindMyPast:

 

  All Society journals from 1992 to 2016 including over 800 individual articles
·         All Society publications including extensive collections of gravestone inscriptions, historic records and surname studies.
·         Released online for the  first time
 
Dublin, Ireland, October 18th 2016

Leading Family History website Findmypast, has today announced the online publication of all The’s journals dating from 1992 to 2016. The journals are now available to search as part of the PERiodical Source Index and will be joined by the expansive range of other Genealogical Society or Ireland publications over the coming weeks. The publications consists of a wide range of documents including transcripts of original records, memorial inscriptions, local and surname studies and collections of specialist sources and guides. The information dates back to 1798 and covers many counties in Ireland including Cavan, Dublin, Kildare, Kilkenny, Laois, Louth, Offaly and Wicklow.

The release is comprised of two sets of important publications, namely:

·         Journals – In 1992 the Society commenced publication of a journal. Back then it was the Dun Laoghaire Genealogical Society, but immediately expanded its remit to cover much more than the area around the Borough. It published 224 articles between then and 1999 when it changed its name to the Genealogical Society of Ireland. Since 2000 it has published over 600 articles on Irish family history including transcripts of source materials, scholarly articles, name studies and other material. 

·         Publications – Alongside the journals, the society has had an ambitious publishing programme. It has so far published over 40 individual volumes of source materials. Its first in 1992 was an 1837 memorial from Wicklow signed by hundreds of residents. Thereafter they have published many volumes of gravestone inscriptions and memorials, several school registers, military records, extracts from the 1821 and 1901 census returns, occupational records, information about the population in 1798, and specific family studies, and much more.

Brian Donovan, Head of Irish Records at Findmypast, comments:

Tom Conlon, Director, Sales and Marketing, Genealogical Society of Ireland said “We are delighted to advance to a further stage of collaboration with Findmypast. It brings our portfolio of publications to a very much larger audience worldwide.

The range of information of genealogical interest available online continues to expand at a phenomenal rate. With a few clicks, one can find a whole range of information and records.  By joining a society, members are helped to better interpret this information and to enhance their understanding of the times and circumstances in which their ancestors lived” 

About Findmypast
Findmypast (previously DC Thomson Family History) is a Scottish-owned world leader in online family history. It has an unrivalled record of online innovation in the field and 18 million registered users across its family of online brands, which includes Lives of the First World War, The British Newspaper Archive and Genes Reunited, amongst others.

Its lead brand, also called Findmypast, is a searchable online archive of over eight billion family history records, ranging from parish records and censuses to migration records, military collections, historical newspapers and lots more. For members around the world, the site is a crucial resource for building family trees and conducting detailed historical research.

In April 2003, Findmypast was the first online genealogy site to provide access to the complete birth, marriage, and death indexes for England and Wales, winning the Queen’s Award for Innovation. Since that time, the company has digitised records from across the globe, including over 120 million Irish family history records, the largest collection online.

The Society was established in 1990 to promote an awareness, appreciation and knowledge of our genealogical and heraldic heritage in Ireland and amongst her Diaspora.

It is devoted to the promotion of the study of genealogy and related subjects as educational leisure pursuits available to all in the community irrespective of age, prior-learning, background or socio-economic circumstances by organising Open Meetings, lectures, workshops, publishing genealogical material, organising group project, exhibiting at major relevant events and the provision of an Archive and Research Centre, An Daonchartlann.

The Society encourages its members, undertaking research in every county in Ireland, to make their research available to others through publication. Through its publications  programme, the Society makes accessible to researchers at home and abroad many sources otherwise not available except in their original state. The collection and repatriation of genealogical material is an important function of the Society’s Archive and Research Centre, An Daonchartlann.
www.familyhistory.ie

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy (CAFG) Institute 7-9 Mar 2017

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at the Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy (CAFG).



The Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy (CAFG) is proud to announce two first-time tracks--unique to CAFG--being offered at the 6th Annual Forensic Genealogy Institute to be held March 7-9, 2017, in San Antonio, Texas.

The first track, Applying Genetic Genealogy to a Forensic Specialty, will be led by Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, and offers a unique focus on genetic genealogy for forensic genealogists. This three-day workshop is based on Genetic Genealogy in Practice, with additional material customized for forensic genealogists. Genetic genealogy is a complex topic requiring practice and study to master. Each student will be required to purchase and have in-hand a print copy of the textbook that will be used in the course: Blaine T. Bettinger and Debbie Parker Wayne, CG, Genetic Genealogy in Practice (Arlington, Va.: National Genealogy Society, 2016); available online at http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/cs/home.

The second track, Becoming an Expert: Law and the Forensic Genealogist, will be led by Judy Russell, JD, CG, CGL, aka The Legal Genealogist. From the standards that govern genealogical research to the rules that govern courtroom evidence, the law requires expertise of the forensic genealogist. In this three-day, hands-on program, current and aspiring forensic genealogists will learn more about becoming that kind of expert, from applying the Genealogical Proof Standard to finding the applicable law to understanding the legal processes that govern expert witnesses in forensic cases.

CAFG is the leader in education for forensic genealogists.
Registration opened October 15.
http://www.forensicgenealogists.org/institute

Genealogy Cruise with the Smiths, Eastman and Donna Moughty

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our genea-friends Gary and Diana Smith.



We now have our 3rd Winter Genealogy Getaway scheduled. 

Dick Eastman
We will be traveling with CruiseEverything again, on the lovely Celebrity Silhouette, with our friends Dick Eastman and Donna Moughty, 26 February to 5 March 2017. 
 
Full details are available on the CruiseEverything website at http://www.cecruisegroups.com/genealogy-cruise-2014.html

There is a new video about the genealogy cruises, and a link to a few pictures from the past, plus, of course, a link to the upcoming cruise.  Check it out!
Donna Moughty
As before, we are planning a wide range of genealogy activities. We will have presentations and some group sessions in private meeting rooms, one-on-one consultation opportunities, and lots of networking available. There will be genealogy activities every day at sea, plus a few optional opportunities in port, should you choose to stay on board. The topics will be announced soon.

The Silhouette is a lovely 5-star ship, and Celebrity treats us very well. We will:
  • Leave Fort Lauderdale on Sunday afternoon.
  • Monday and Tuesday morning we will be at sea.
  • Tuesday afternoon we’ll arrive in San Juan, Puerto Rico. 
  • Wednesday we’ll spend the day in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas
  • Thursday in Phillipsburg, St. Maarten.
  • Friday and Saturday we'll spend all day at sea.
  • Arrive back in Fort Lauderdale on Sunday morning.  
This will give us plenty of time for genealogy, networking, shipboard activities, and sightseeing in the ports.

Any questions, contact Herb at CruiseEverything (239)275-1717 for more details.  Celebrity has offered some early booking amenities (shipboard credit, basic beverage package, in-cabin internet access, or prepaid gratuities) available until the end of October.  The deposit to hold your space is $250 per person, with final payment due 1 December 2016.

We look forward to seeing you again.  Any questions on the genealogy portion of the trip, contact us at GenCruise@gmail.com.

When the papers are purposefully burned

Or merely succumb to the ravages of time

 



DearREADERS,
Thanks to Nicka Smith for drawing my attention to "Oral history, Alex Haley's Roots and the question of proof" from the Latino Genealogy blog where author Ellen Fernandez-Sacco discusses the tragedy of eugenics and the unfortunate tradition of downplaying oral history in our research. She thoughtfully writes "Ultimately, our task is to make visible and thereby end the historical erasure of difference (ethnic, race, gender, class) in the historical and genealogical record, and thereby honor those who came before us, our ancestors and their struggles."

True Lewis, your blog is listed in Fernandez-Sacco's post as a resource. So is Bernice Bennett's podcast and Angela Walton-Raji's podcast. Robin Foster's work is mentioned. Gosh, the list goes on and on. There is great scholarship among our fellow researchers and instructors with African American ancestry.

I would also like to point my readers to the recent trip to Ghana by Thom Reed on behalf of FamilySearch's oral history digitization work. He went with a film crew, long after the fact, inquiring about the impact, the feelings people had about the project. He interviewed individuals, families and community leaders in towns and rural communities alike. I was especially touched by his apparent ability to relate to traditions outside the scope of his upbringing. See Thom's public posts here: https://www.facebook.com/tlreed97

IMAGE:

#ThomInGhana - Day 6 "Kantanyensua Village," image 10 of 31 from
Thom Reed's Facebook album by the same name. Used with permission.

"Coming of age" for me in white, upper middle class America didn't involve my memorizing ten or twenty generations of my ancestry and being able to recite it accurately in a town council. My culture required paper documents to prove ancestry and it was all about legitimacy and inheritance.

Perhaps my first exposure to the genealogical research challenges faced by People of Color was in the book Finding a Place Called Home: A Guide to African-American Genealogy by Dee Parmer Woodtor Ph.D.

It was from chats with Dee where I learned the value of traditions, food, things our grandmothers told us, and what our grandparents told us of their grandparents. 

Dee helped me understand how those old ways of behaving, our elders' ways of thinking, can influence us for the good. We learn to appreciate the strength of our ancestors to survive and appreciate the sacrifices they made. 

I know that last sentence sounds trite, but I mean it sincerely.

I don't have slave ancestors, but I have female ancestors who didn't have the right to vote. I have ancestors who were tarred and feathered, and run out of town for their religious beliefs. Some of my readers have ancestors smuggled to safety while others perished in Nazi concentration camps. I have younger friends who survived the incursion of the Khmer Rouge as he ordered his men to turn patients out of hospitals, shoot teachers and civil leaders, burn buildings and books - all to obliterate the history of a people and in the ensuing chaos subjugate the people and expand his empire. History is replete with stories of ethnic cleansing and territorial conquest.
What is left when the papers are purposefully burned, or merely succumb to the ravages of time? It is the traditions and teachings of our goodly forefathers, who regardless of circumstances, did their level best to teach us what's truly important - love and respect. 

I think the impact of the Fernandez-Sacco's blog post is further refining my openness and appreciation for my sisters and brothers whose upbringing happened to be different from mine. Maybe refining isn't the right word. Maybe this blog is teaching me. Yes. That's it.

What does this rambling mean? That I don't wish to hang out only with people who are just like me. Ok, Mrs. Graham, my 8th grade grammar teacher, maybe not so much.

I enjoy hanging out with people who are different from me. It helps me appreciate each man. Didn't we outgrow cliques and snap-judgements in high school?

Isn't it delightful to see the variety of family traditions among our friends and neighbors? 😊

As genealogists, don't we thrill at the mere mention of a genealogical breakthrough? 😊

You bet! 💕

It's about finding FAMILY and as Dee always said it's "Finding a Place Called Home."



NOTE: DearMYRTLE and Cousin Russ recognize the United Nations' International Decade for People of African Descent 2015-2024. We reach out to _all_ regardless of race, color, creed or national origin with support for researching family and documenting cultural inheritance. http://www.un.org/en/events/africandescentdecade

NOTE: The old, crumbly account books picture at the top of this post, AdobeStock_27307999, is used by permission from http://stock.adobe.com

Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you'll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.


Ancestry announces WE'RE RELATED app



DearREADERS,
This website just went live today at Noon Mountain time (US) with both an iOS and Droid app. I am downloading the new app on my iPhone and haven't explored it yet. Thanks the following information from Mathew Deighton, our contact at Ancestry, we know a little bit more:

"We are continually looking for ways to make your family history better, but this time it’s your descendants that we want to help you with. One of the main times that people become interested in family history is when the keeper of the stories in the family has passed. By then so much has been lost. It breaks out hearts when we hear about a family member throwing away boxes of photos, a family bible and other historical records because they think no one else is interested.

Go to www.wererelated.com on your phone to download the app now. It will be available for everyone else in the app store tomorrow.

The new We’re Related app is aimed at getting the next generation involved. The App will help your family members to discover what friends or famous people they may be related to! With about 2000 celebrities in the database, you’ll quickly begin seeing what celebrities you’re connected to.

As family historians, sharing our discoveries with family can be difficult. Now as the next generation downloads the app, they will start connecting with famous people and the app will show you how you are connected. It’s at this time that you can share who these people are and what you’ve learned about them.

Main Points:
·         Don’t need an Ancestry account to sign up
·         You will use your Facebook account to sign up, thus allowing anyone to use the app
·         It will use your Facebook relationships to find you in the Ancestry system and allow you to connect with celebrities and friends
·         If you don’t have a tree, you can start one or ask a family member to get it started for you
·         Use the “Nearby” tool to see who is related to you within 500 ft. They must have the functionality on as well
·         Share your new connections through social media

This is not a standalone research tool, but a fun and light-hearted way to get your family engaged in your family history work."
 Happy family tree climbing!
Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you'll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.


Sunday, October 16, 2016

REGISTER NOW: 2 DearMYRTLE hangouts this week


DearREADERS,
In addition to our flagship hangout Mondays with Myrt, we're going to have a hum-dinger of a hangout on Wednesday evening. If you've already watched Elizabeth Shown Mills' presentation FAN + GPS + DNA: The Problem-Solver's Great Trifecta then you will be somewhat prepared. Read comments below the registration info about homework to be completed before this WACKY Wednesday session begins.

Noon Eastern US (New York)
11am Central US (Chicago)
10am Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
9am Pacific US (Los Angeles)
UTC-7 hours

9pm Eastern US (New York)
8pm Central US (Chicago)
7pm Mountain US (Denver, Salt Lake City)
6pm Pacific US (Los Angeles) 
UTC-7 hours

Homework: Attendees will view in advance the recent video session "FAN + GPS + DNA: The Problem-Solver's Great Trifecta" by Elizabeth Shown Mills, CG, CGL. The video and accompanying handout are available free through October 17, 2016 at Family Tree Webinars here:
http://familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=501
  • After that one may log in to the site, or purchase the digital download.
  • Be sure to print out the handouts accompanying this video.
  • Make notes about your reaction about ESM's presentation.
  • We will be discussing how to apply these principles in our personal research. 
  • Due to copyright restrictions, we will not be sharing either the video or the handouts during our hangout discussion.
For future DearMYRTLE hangouts, be sure check Myrt's Calender here.


Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you'll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.


Saturday, October 15, 2016

NEHGS: 2017 Books (plus) Catalog

NOTE from DearMYRTLE: The following was received from our friends at the New England Historical and Genealogical Society.


The New England Historic Genealogical Society is pleased to announce that the 2017 Books + Gifts Catalog is now available online! Newly updated, the catalog features publications released during the past year and highlights upcoming titles that will be available in the coming months. The online version is fully linked to products within our store. New works by NEHGS staff cover everything from Irish research to study project compilations to advice on creating a bibliography. A table of contents allows you to find books in your favorite categories - Portable Genealogists, the Great Migration, regional resources, writing guides, and more - and an index enables you to look up books by title. 

The cover photo was taken by NEHGS Director of Digital Strategy Claire Vail at Plimoth Plantation last year. The image portrays Alice Bradford (Governor Bradford’s second wife) represented by Kyle Damron.

Sunday, October 09, 2016

No DearMYRTLE hangouts this week: Welsh research is calling me



DearREADERS,
Just a reminder: there will be no DearMYRTLE hangouts during the week of 9-15 October 2016, as Ol' Myrt will be studying at the week-long British Institute sponsored by the International Society for British Genealogy and Family History. Most classes will be held at the Plaza Hotel in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah, next door to the Family History Library. I'll again focus "Welsh Family and Community History" under the tutelage of Darris Williams, AG.

DearMYRTLE hangouts will resume 17 October 2016 with Mondays with Myrt.


Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you'll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.


Archiving: Overcoming emotions with working with Dad's files




DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt here has to thank "The Archive Lady" Melissa LeMaster Barker for her "31 Days of Tips from The Archive Lady" series posted on her blog A Genealogist in the Archives. This work prompted the following Facebook conversation:

 Myrt to Melissa: 
Thank you for posting your "archivist" series here in The Organized Genealogist Facebook Group, Melissa. Because of your kind, self-effacing nature, it took a little arm twisting, but I don't want members of TOG to miss a single point.

Pulling together and organizing our records is a challenge.

I'm wondering if I can begin to tackle my Dad's six old banker boxes of genealogy. I've been "through" them, but cataloging and scanning has seemed too tender a task to undertake since his passing. 

There *has* to be a way to focus on the methodology of organizing that will help tender-hearted folks like me.

I do have some questions:

1. Is there a standard form for creating an "official" Finding Aid?

2. Do archivists spend time rearranging pages within a six bankers box collection comprising 5-6 running feet of shelf space?

In my case, *most* of Dad's high school reunion pictures, programs and letters received from classmates are in one large bankers box, and will be moved to about six archival safe Hullinger boxes. (He was reunion chair for decades.)

*Additional* papers relating to my father's class reunion work are found in clumps here and there among the other old banker boxes.

Writing this just now has CLARIFIED my thinking. I plan to donate the class reunion papers to an archives in Seattle, so of necessity I *will* need to rearrange papers

This separation of class reunion papers and photos from personal family documents and photos is necessary.

3. How on *earth* would an archivist have time to do this type of sorting in a collection of this size?

IMAGE: Courtesy of Amazon.com
4. Will it aid in faster processing at a Seattle area archives if I do attempt to create a Finding Aid for each Hollinger box?




5. Is there an online guide for creating a Finding Aid? I am unsure how detailed one should be.

On a personal note, I think focusing on this high school reunion collection is a good place for me to start tackling Dad's bankers boxes. While I'll see his handiwork, much of this portion of his collection includes photos and letters of his former classmates.

I'm hoping once I get on a roll creating Finding Aids it will be easier to tackle the personal "stuff." A more clinical approach is required.

After all, I don't want my tears to stain my dad's old paperwork.
Melissa to Myrt: (used with permission.)

I know how hard it can be to open those boxes of our loved ones past but we also know that it has to be done. I suggest doing it in steps and do what you can and if it gets to be too much emotionally, walk away. Come back when you can and start again.

Let’s address the questions you have posed:

1 and 2: Here is an article from the Society of American Archivist which includes a sample Finding Aid that will show any genealogist how to do one for themselves with their own collections: http://www2.archivists.org/usingarchives/appendix
 When a “raw” collection of records is donated to the archives, the very first thing an archivists does is note the “original order” of the collection. This takes into consideration how the record and items have been boxed, in what order are they placed in file folders, 3-ring binders, etc. Original order is very important to us and we try very hard to keep the collections in original order. Now, if there seems to be no order to the collection, the archivist will impose an order that makes sense and one that is user friendly to the researcher. So, your Father’s collection, if there is no particular order you can impose your own order. You can put records of the same subject together and then organize by date.

3. You asked about how archivists have time to process a collection the size of yours. What genealogists don’t know is that it can take an archivist about 6 months to process a collection the size of 6 banker’s boxes or even longer depending on what other task they have to do in the archives including helping patrons that visit our facilities. Processing a records collection takes a lot of time but it is all worth it when a researcher finds what they are looking for.

4. If you are donating any records to a repository do not take the time to organize the collection or make a finding aid. This may seem like it will be a help but to be honest the archivist will take the collection and impose their own organization and finding aid guidelines to it.

One thing to keep in mind, archivist will first organize the collection and even get it to it’s final stages of everything in files and boxes that are labeled and then they produce the finding aid. The Finding Aid is actually the last thing that is made for a collection. The processing and organization of the collection comes first.

If you have any other questions, please ask. I love being and archivist and I love sharing my craft with genealogists and teaching them how to be a “Home Archivist”.
From Lisa Hork Gorrell to Melissa and Ol' Myrt: (used with permission.)
This is very timely, as I have been given the task to create a Finding Aid for all of our collections at the historical society. I have been using examples from archives found at Online Archive of California. http://www.oac.cdlib.org/
OK, Ol' Myrt here is committed to pulling all of her father-dad's high school class reunion "stuff" in preparation for sending to an archives in Seattle. I cannot help but think I should scan and blog about everything I encounter. That would also "get the word out" to descendants of Dad's classmates.

The image at the top of this post is of our father Glen S. Player in his earliest year as a student of Queen Anne High School, up on Queen Anne Hill near the water tower, in Seattle, Washington. It has been converted into condominiums. The following is a picture I took of him during a visit in 2001. He died seven years later, but at this time could still walk, though somewhat haltingly from time to time.

Happy family tree climbing!
Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you'll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.


Wednesday, October 05, 2016

Call for hangout presenters



DearREADERS,
Ol' Myrt here got to thinking about Nicka Smith's compelling post “The Problem of the Color Line” describing the disconnect between US Census bureau statistics about diversity and the under-representation of People of Color (POC) as presenters at US regional and national genealogy conferences. While Cousin Russ and I have had POC on our hangout panels, and have several as presenters, the majority of our presentions and study group participants are not POC.

Never has a POC approached DearMYRTLE about participating in one of our hangout or study group series.

Yet Cousin Russ and I have had people approach us about British Research (2016), British and Irish Military  Records (2016) and Irish Research (2017)

AND 
these people offered to design the course of study and be a member of the panel. 

We have had multiple individuals who have approached us to spotlight their:
  • website
  • a specific database on their website
  • newly released book

Only one was a person of color.

In all cases, I've had little, if any, experience on the topic. Apparently my newbie questions as the "opinionated moderator" doesn't negatively impact the discussion.

As Cousin Russ and I consider the schedule for our 2017 hangouts and study groups, it would be refreshing to have experienced presenters offer to speak in a single hangout and/or coordinate a multi-part study group. Some topics come immediately to mind:
  • Ethnic-specific topics: African American pre-1870 research strategies, Chinese migrations to South America, Native American
  • Locality-specific topics: Brazil, Eastern Europe, France, Mexico, Scandinavia, Spain, South America, southern US
  • Religious-specific topics:  Jewish genealogy, locating US Lutheran Church Records,
  • Methodology-specific topics: writing the narrative, composing proof arguments
  • Other topics: paleography, maps and land records, US military, maps and land records,
  • Clothing
  • Medical practices
  • Female ancestors 
  • Newspapers
I've heard it said that people are "afraid" to give a presentation in our conversational, open access format, for fear it will diminish the call for in-person presentations on the same topic. What we've found is that our work attracts a different audience. It may be the lure of the "paid" speaking gigs at our esteemed colleague Geoff Rasmussen's Family Tree Webinars.
What we offer is a spunky yet professional environment to spotlight a presenter's expertise, in an open discussion format where slides and website demos are most appreciated by our attendees.




DearMYRTLE and Cousin Russ recognize the United Nations' International Decade for People of African Descent 2015-2024. We reach out to _all_ regardless of race, color, creed or national origin with support for researching family and documenting cultural inheritance. http://www.un.org/en/events/africandescentdecade

FOR FURTHER READING

Hangouts: Pay what you want. So it's simple. If you value the work Ol' Myrt, +Cousin Russ and our beloved panelists do week in and week out on your behalf, please:


Check the DearMYRTLE Hangouts Calendar for upcoming study groups and hangouts. There you'll find links to the GeneaConference (in-person) and the GeneaWebinars Calendar with over over 200 hours of online genealogy classes, webinars, live streams and tweetchats from other hosts and presenters over the next 12 months.